UpToDate: Internal carotid artery segments

Internal carotid artery segments

The course of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and its segment classifications were reviewed by means of a new and freely available interactive 3D model of the artery and the skull base, based on human neuroimages, that can be freely downloaded at the Public Repository of the University of Barcelona ( http://diposit.ub.edu/dspace/handle/2445/112442 ) and runs under Adobe Acrobat Reader in Mac and Windows computers and Windows 10 tablets. The 3D-PDF allows zoom, rotation, selective visualization of structures, and a predefined sequence view. Illustrative images of the different classifications were obtained 1).

In 1938 Fischer, described five internal carotid artery segments in the opposite direction to the blood flow 2).

These segments were based on the angiographic course of the intracranial ICA rather than its arterial branches or anatomic compartments. Subsequent attempts to apply modern nomenclature to these numerical segments failed to recognize Fischer’s original intent of describing patterns of arterial displacement by tumors and, therefore, resulted in a nomenclature that was anatomically inaccurate. Fischer’s system was further limited, because segments were numbered opposite the direction of blood flow and the extracranial ICA was excluded 3).


Gibo et al. in 1981 studied the microsurgical anatomy of the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) in 50 adult cadaver cerebral hemispheres using X 3 to X 40 magnification. The ICA was divided into four parts: the C1 or cervical portion; the C2 or petrous portion; the C3 or cavernous portion; and the C4 or supraclinoid portion.

The C4 portion was divided into three segments based on the origin of its major branches: the ophthalmic segment extended from the origin of the ophthalmic artery to the origin of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA); the communicating segment extended from the origin of the PCoA to the origin of the anterior choroidal artery (AChA); and the choroidal segment extended from the origin of the AChA to the bifurcation of the carotid artery. Each segment gave off a series of perforating branches with a relatively constant site of termination. The perforating branches arising from the ophthalmic segment passed to the optic nerve and chiasminfundibulum, and the floor of the third ventricle. The perforating branches arising from the communicating segment passed to the optic tract and the floor of the third ventricle. The perforating branches arises from the choroidal segment passed upward and entered the brain through the anterior perforated substance. The anatomy of the ophthalmic, posterior communicating, anterior choroidal, and superior hypophyseal branches of the C4 portion was also examined. Gibo-Rothon (J Neurosurg 55:560-574, 1981) follow the blood flow, incorporated the cervical and petrous portions, and divided the subarachnoid course-supraclinoid-in ophthalmic, communicating, and choroidal segments, enhancing transcranial microscopic approaches 4).


see Bouthillier classification.

Bouthillier et al. described in 1996 a seven segment internal carotid artery (ICA) classification system. It remains the most widely used system for describing ICA segments.


The Kassam’s group (2014), with an endoscopic endonasal perspective, introduces the “paraclival segment,” including the “lacerum segment” and part of the intracavernous ICA, and details surgical landmarks to minimize the risk of injury 5).

see also Carotid Siphon

AC: anterior clinoid process; ICA: internal carotid artery; LT: lamina terminalis; ON: optic nerve; OlN; olfactory nerve; SW: sphenoid wing; TS: tuberculum sellae; A1: A1 segment of the Anterior Cerebral Artery; A2: A2 segment of the Anterior Cerebral Artery; M1: M1 segment of the Middle Cerebral Artery

Endoscopic classification

Based on anatomic correlations, the ICA may be described as 6 distinct segments:

(1) parapharyngeal (common carotid artery bifurcation to carotid canal)

(2) petrous (carotid canal to posterolateral aspect of foramen lacerum)

(3) paraclival (posterolateral foramen lacerum to the superomedial aspect of the petrous apex)

(4) parasellar (superomedial petrous apex to the proximal dural ring)

(5) paraclinoid (from the proximal to the distal dural rings)

(6) intradural (distal ring to ICA bifurcation).

Corresponding surgical landmarks included the Eustachian tube, the fossa of Rosenmüller, and levator veli palatini for the parapharyngeal segment; the vidian canal and V3 for the petrous segment; the fibrocartilage of foramen lacerumforamen rotundummaxillary strut, lingular process of the sphenoid bone, and paraclival protuberance for the paraclival segment; the sellar floor and petrous apex for the parasellar segment; and the medial and lateral opticocarotid and lateral tubercular recesses, as well as the distal osseous arch of the carotid sulcus for the paraclinoid segment 6).

see Intracavernous internal carotid artery.

References

1)

Melé MV, Puigdellívol-Sánchez A, Mavar-Haramija M, Juanes-Méndez JA, Román LS, De Notaris M, Catapano G, Prats-Galino A. Review of the main surgical and angiographic-oriented classifications of the course of the internal carotid artery through a novel interactive 3D model. Neurosurg Rev. 2018 Jul 26. doi: 10.1007/s10143-018-1012-7. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PubMed PMID: 30051302.
2)

Fischer E. Die Lageabweichungen der vorderen hirnarterie im gefässbild. Zentralbl Neurochir. 1938;3:300–313.
3)

Bouthillier A, van Loveren HR, Keller JT. Segments of the internal carotid artery: a new classification. Neurosurgery. 1996 Mar;38(3):425-32; discussion 432-3. PubMed PMID: 8837792.
4)

Gibo H, Lenkey C, Rhoton AL Jr. Microsurgical anatomy of the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid artery. J Neurosurg. 1981 Oct;55(4):560-74. PubMed PMID: 7277004.
5) , 6)

Labib MA, Prevedello DM, Carrau R, Kerr EE, Naudy C, Abou Al-Shaar H, Corsten M, Kassam A. A road map to the internal carotid artery in expanded endoscopic endonasal approaches to the ventral cranial base. Neurosurgery. 2014 Sep;10 Suppl 3:448-71. doi: 10.1227/NEU.0000000000000362. PubMed PMID: 24717685.

UpToDate: Osteoporotic vertebral fracture treatment

Osteoporotic vertebral fracture treatment

Initial therapy for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCF) are bed rest, orthotic devices and pain medication 1) 2).

However, some patients fail to benefit from these treatment modalities and disease-related morbidity and mortality persists. Conservatively treated OVCF’s are cured with partial relief of pain and quality of life within 2 to 12 weeks 3) 4)

Kyphoplasty was developed to restore vertebral height and improve sagittal alignment. Several studies have shown these theoretical improvements cannot be transferred universally to the clinical setting.

see Vertebral augmentation.

The treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures using transpedicular cement augmentation has grown significantly since 1990s.

The treatment of painful vertebral compression fractures has changed substantially since the introduction of vertebroplasty in the mid-1980s and balloon kyphoplasty in the late 1990s. Both procedures were widely accepted with the vertebral fractures treated reaching 150,000 per annum in 2009 prior to the publication of 2 randomized controlled trials comparing vertebroplasty with a sham treatment published in the New England Journal of Medicine in August 2009. Since then, there has been a flood of information on vertebral augmentation and balloon kyphoplasty. It is worth evaluating this information especially because it relates to current recommendations that are often followed blindly by medical and administrative groups unfamiliar with either the procedure or the high level of evidence surrounding vertebral augmentation 5).


In a multicenter study, Kallmes et al., randomly assigned 131 patients who had one to three painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures to undergo either vertebroplasty or a simulated procedure without cement (control group). The primary outcomes were scores on the modified Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) (on a scale of 0 to 23, with higher scores indicating greater disability) and patients’ ratings of average painintensity during the preceding 24 hours at 1 month (on a scale of 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating more severe pain). Patients were allowed to cross over to the other study group after 1 month.

All patients underwent the assigned intervention (68 vertebroplasties and 63 simulated procedures). The baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. At 1 month, there was no significant difference between the vertebroplasty group and the control group in either the RDQ score (difference, 0.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.3 to 2.8; P=0.49) or the pain rating (difference, 0.7; 95% CI, -0.3 to 1.7; P=0.19). Both groups had immediate improvement in disability and pain scores after the intervention. Although the two groups did not differ significantly on any secondary outcome measure at 1 month, there was a trend toward a higher rate of clinically meaningful improvement in pain (a 30% decrease from baseline) in the vertebroplasty group (64% vs. 48%, P=0.06). At 3 months, there was a higher crossover rate in the control group than in the vertebroplasty group (51% vs. 13%, P<0.001) [corrected]. There was one serious adverse event in each group.

Improvements in pain and pain-related disability associated with osteoporotic compression fractures in patients treated with vertebroplasty were similar to the improvements in a control group 6).

On the other hand a randomized controlled trial (Fracture Reduction Evaluation [FREE] trial) which took place at 21 sites in eight countries and included 149 patients assigned to balloon kyphoplasty showed that in patients with acute, painful, vertebral fractures, balloon kyphoplasty improved quality of life, function, mobility, and pain more rapidly than did nonsurgical management, with significant differences in improvement between the groups at 1 month 7).

References

1)

Riek AE, Towler DA. The pharmacological management of osteoporosis. Mo Med. 2011;108:118–123.

2)

Rapado A. General management of vertebral fractures. Bone. 1996;18:191S–196S.

3)

Brown CJ, Friedkin RJ, Inouye SK. Prevalence and outcomes of low mobility in hospitalized older patients. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004;52:1263–1270.

4)

Babayev M, Lachmann E, Nagler W. The controversy surrounding sacral insufficiency fractures: to ambulate or not to ambulate? Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2000;79:404–409.

5)

Beall DP, McRoberts WP, Berven SH, Ledlie JT, Tutton SM, Parsons BP. Critique of the Analysis of UpToDate.com on the Treatment of Painful Vertebral Compression Fractures: Time to Update UpToDate. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2014 Nov 20. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25414003.

6)

Kallmes DF, Comstock BA, Heagerty PJ, Turner JA, Wilson DJ, Diamond TH, Edwards R, Gray LA, Stout L, Owen S, Hollingworth W, Ghdoke B, Annesley-Williams DJ, Ralston SH, Jarvik JG. A randomized trial of vertebroplasty for osteoporotic spinal fractures. N Engl J Med. 2009 Aug 6;361(6):569-79. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa0900563. Erratum in: N Engl J Med. 2012 Mar 8;366(10):970. PubMed PMID: 19657122; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2930487.

7)

Wardlaw D, Cummings SR, Van Meirhaeghe J, Bastian L, Tillman JB, Ranstam J, Eastell R, Shabe P, Talmadge K, Boonen S. Efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty compared with non-surgical care for vertebral compression fracture (FREE): a randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2009 Mar 21;373(9668):1016-24. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(09)60010-6. Epub 2009 Feb 24. PubMed PMID: 19246088.

UpToDate: Pituicytoma

Pituicytoma

Pituicytoma is a rare glial sellar/suprasellar neoplasm arising in the neurohypophysis with a possible origin from the folliculostellate cells of the adenohypophysis which are non-endocrine spindled cells expressing S-100 and Bcl-2 1) 2).

Pituicytoma is considered to be a distinct Grade I neoplasm 3).

Although usually intra-sellar, pituicytomas can have suprasellar extension; however, purely suprasellar examples although rare have been reported 4).

Epidemiology

PTs had a higher prevalence in the fifth and sixth decades of life, with a slight male predominance. 5).

Clinical features

The presenting symptoms are due to the mass effect of the tumor and include visual disturbances caused by direct compression on the optic chiasm, headaches, endocrinological symptoms and rarely diabetes insipidus 6).

Diagnosis

Radiologically, PTs were found anywhere along the hypothalamic-pituitary axis mimicking other, more frequent tumors growing in this anatomical region 7).

The MRI features are non-specific with most case reports showing a solid, homogenous mass, iso-intense on T1-weighted images and hyper-intense on T2-weighted images with homogenous contrast enhancement 8).

Amongst the various sellar tumors, pituicytoma and spindle cell oncocytoma (SCO) have considerable overlap in histological, Immunohistochemical (IHC) profile and can have extensive intraoperative bleeding making complete excision difficult with increased chances of recurrence. It is important to differentiate pituicytoma from SCO since the former is associated with a slightly better prognosis with recurrence being uncommon after complete surgical excision. Till 2013, out of 29 cases of pituicytoma with a detailed follow-up, recurrence was seen in six cases, all of which were found to have an incomplete resection during the first surgery 9).

SCO on the other hand have a tendency to recur even after complete excision. Hence, it is advocated to combine surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy in all cases of SCO to reduce the chances of recurrence. EMA is strongly positive in SCO, thus it can help to differentiate pituicytoma from SCO 10).

Subtypes

TTF-1 Expressing Sellar Neoplasm with Ependymal Rosettes and Oncocytic Change: Mixed Ependymal and Oncocytic Variant 11).

Treatment

Review

Less than 50 cases have been reported in the world literature till 2013 12).

Salge-Arrieta et al., from the Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal Madrid, Spain, published a retrospective review of case reports published in the scientific literature to 2018, including a new illustrative example treated.

116 cases were collected. PTs had a higher prevalence in the fifth and sixth decades of life, with a slight male predominance. Main symptoms, which tended to be progressive, included visual field defects and pituitary-hypothalamic dysfunction. Radiologically, PTs were found anywhere along the hypothalamic-pituitary axis mimicking other, more frequent tumors growing in this anatomical region. Surgical treatment included both transcranial or transsphenoidal approaches, and resulted in gross total resection and morbidity rates of 46.8 and 59%, respectively; the latter essentially consisted in anterior and posterior pituitary dysfunction, with limited impact on daily quality of life.

Due to both low frequency and the absence of pathognomonic clinical and/or radiological features, formulating a suspicion diagnosis of PT represents a considerable challenge even for experienced professionals. The indication for treatment should be made on an individual basis, but it is inescapable in the presence of a visual field defect. The surgical approach has to be tailored according to the topography of the tumor and preoperative symptoms; the greatest challenges in accomplishing a gross total removal are represented by the degree of adherence and vascularization of the PT 13).

Case series

Lefevre et al., from the Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France published a retrospective multicenter study, reporting the clinical manifestations, radiological characteristics, histopathological features, treatment strategies and long-term outcomes of patients who have been treated for a Pituicytoma at various institutions in Paris, France over the past 10 years. In addition, they compared the results to the world literature in order to identify similarities concerning the radiographic diagnosis and the treatment strategies of these tumors.

Eight patients were operated on in four different hospitals. Misdiagnosis was constant before surgery, pituitary adenoma or craniopharyngioma being suspected. During surgery (transsphenoidal approach: six cases, transcranial approach: two cases) unusual tumors were noted, with important bleeding in most cases. Complete resection could be obtained in five patients. Pathological diagnosis was confirmed in all cases. During the follow up two recurrences occurred. One was subsequently treated with radiotherapy, the other underwent a second surgery.

Recent updates concerning the histological diagnosis of pituicytomas should be generalized to our practice in order to provide a better understanding of this rare pathology and its natural course 14).

References

1)

Phillips JJ, Misra A, Feuerstein BG, Kunwar S, Tihan T. Pituicytoma: Characterization of a unique neoplasm by histology, immunohistochemistry, ultrastructure, and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2010;134:1063-9.

2)

Koutourousiou M, Gardner PA, Kofler JK, Fernandez-Miranda JC, Snyderman CH, Lunsford LD. Rare infundibular tumors: clinical presentation, imaging findings, and the role of endoscopic endonasal surgery in their management. J Neurol Surg B Skull Base. 2013 Feb;74(1):1-11. doi: 10.1055/s-0032-1329619. Epub 2012 Dec 31. PubMed PMID: 24436883; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3699169.

3)

Louis DN, Ohgaki H, Wiestler OD, Cavenee WK, Burger PC, Jouvet A, et al. The 2007 WHO classification of tumours of the central nervous system. Acta Neuropathol 2007;114:97-109.

4)

Zhang F, Chen J, You C. Pituicytoma: Case report and review of the literature. Neurol India 2010;58:799-801.

5) , 7) , 13)

Salge-Arrieta FJ, Carrasco-Moro R, Rodríguez-Berrocal V, Pian H, Martínez-San Millán JS, Iglesias P, Ley-Urzáiz L. Clinical features, diagnosis and therapy of pituicytoma: an update. J Endocrinol Invest. 2018 Jul 20. doi: 10.1007/s40618-018-0923-z. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PubMed PMID: 30030746.

6) , 8)

Chu J, Yang Z, Meng Q, Yang J. Pituicytoma: Case report and literature review. Br J Radiol 2011;84:e55-7.

9) , 10)

Ogiwara H, Dubner S, Shafizadeh S, Raizer J, Chandler JP. Spindle cell oncocytoma of the pituitary and pituicytoma: Two tumors mimicking pituitary adenoma. Surg Neurol Int 2011;2:116.

11)

Saeed Kamil Z, Sinson G, Gucer H, Asa SL, Mete O. TTF-1 Expressing Sellar Neoplasm with Ependymal Rosettes and Oncocytic Change: Mixed Ependymal and Oncocytic Variant Pituicytoma. Endocr Pathol. 2013 Nov 16. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 24242699.

12)

Shenoy AS, Desai HM, Mehta JK. Pituicytoma: a case report with literature revisited. Indian J Pathol Microbiol. 2013 Apr-Jun;56(2):180-1. doi: 10.4103/0377-4929.118695. PubMed PMID: 24056664.

14)

Lefevre E, Bouazza S, Bielle F, Boch AL. Management of pituicytomas: a multicenter series of eight cases. Pituitary. 2018 Jul 31. doi: 10.1007/s11102-018-0905-3. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30062665.

UpToDate: Cervical total disc replacement versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

Cervical total disc replacement versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

Findlay et al., from London and Edinburgh, researched for cervical total disc replacement versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

Databases including Medline, Embase, and Scopus were searched. Inclusion criteria involved prospective randomized control trials (RCTs) reporting the surgical treatment of patients with symptomatic degenerative cervical disc disease. Two independent investigators extracted the data. The strength of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. The primary outcome measures were overall and neurological success, and these were included in the meta-analysis. Standardized patient-reported outcomes, including the incidence of further surgery and adjacent segment disease, were summarized and discussed.

A total of 22 papers published from 14 randomized control trials (RCTs) were included, representing 3160 patients with follow-up of up to ten years. Meta-analysis indicated that TDR is superior to ACDF at two years and between four and seven years. In the short-term, patients who underwent TDR had better patient-reported outcomes than those who underwent ACDF, but at two years this was typically not significant. Results between four and seven years showed significant differences in Neck Disability Index (NDI), 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) physical component scores, dysphagia, and satisfaction, all favouring TDR. Most trials found significantly less adjacent segment disease after TDR at both two years (short-term) and between four and seven years (medium- to long-term).

TDR is as effective as ACDF and superior for some outcomes. Disc replacement reduces the risk of adjacent segment disease. Continued uncertainty remains about degeneration of the prosthesis. Long-term surveillance of patients who undergo TDR may allow its routine use 1).


Cervical total disc replacement (TDR) has been shown in a number of prospective clinical studies to be a viable treatment alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for symptomatic cervical degenerative disc disease. In addition to preserving motion, evidence suggests that cervical TDR may result in a lower incidence of subsequent surgical intervention than treatment with fusion.

One reason for this trend is the observation that in clinical studies, patients with a history of cervical arthrodesis seem to have a higher incidence of adjacent segment degeneration 2) 3) 4).

Furthermore, in biomechanical investigations, most authors have reported an increase in the segmental range of motion (ROM) and the intradiscal pressure (IDP) in the levels proximal and distal to a simulated mono- or bisegmental arthrodesis 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10) 11) 12) 13) 14).

While anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) has been the standard of care for 2-level disease, a randomized clinical trial (RCT) suggested similar outcomes.

There are also critical debates regarding the long-term effects of heterotopic ossification (HO) and the prevalence of adjacent-level degeneration.

1)

Findlay C, Ayis S, Demetriades AK. Total disc replacement versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Bone Joint J. 2018 Aug;100-B(8):991-1001. doi: 10.1302/0301-620X.100B8.BJJ-2018-0120.R1. PubMed PMID: 30062947.
2)

Goffin J, Geusens E, Vantomme N, Quintens E, Waerzeggers Y, Depreitere B, et al. Long-term follow-up after interbody fusion of the cervical spine. J Spinal Disord Tech. 2004;17:79–85. doi: 10.1097/00024720-200404000-00001.
3)

Gore DR, Sepic SB. Anterior discectomy and fusion for painful cervical disc disease: a report of 50 patients with an average follow-up of 21 years. Spine. 1998;23:2047–2051. doi: 10.1097/00007632-199810010-00002.
4)

Hilibrand AS, Carlson GD, Palumbo MA, Jones PK, Bohlman H. Radiculopathy and myelopathy at segments adjacent to the site of a previous anterior cervical arthrodesis. J Bone Joint Surg. 1999;81-A:519–528.
5)

Chang U-K, Kim DH, Lee MC, Willenberg R, Kim S-H, Lim J. Changes in adjacent-level disc pressure and facet joint force after cervical arthroplasty compared with cervical discectomy and fusion. J Neurosurg Spine. 2007;7:33–39. doi: 10.3171/SPI-07/07/033.
6)

Chang U-K, Kim DH, Lee MC, Willenberg R, Kim S-H, Lim J. Range of motion change after cervical arthroplasty with ProDisc-C and Prestige artificial discs compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. J Neurosurg Spine. 2007;7:40–46. doi: 10.3171/SPI-07/07/040.
7)

DiAngelo DJ, Foley KT, Morrow BR, Schwab JS, Song J, German JW, et al. In vitro biomechanics of cervical disc arthroplasty with the ProDisc-C total disc implant. Neurosurg Focus. 2004;17(E7):44–54. doi: 10.3171/foc.2004.17.3.7.
8)

DiAngelo DJ, Robertson JT, Metcalf NH, McVay BJ, Davis RC. Biomechanical testing of an artificial cervical joint and an anterior plate. J Spinal Disord Tech. 2003;16:314–323. doi: 10.1097/00024720-200308000-00002.
9)

Dmitriev AE, Cunningham BW, Hu N, Sell G, Vigna F, McAfee PC. Adjacent level intradiscal pressure and segmental kinematics following a cervical total disc arthroplasty. An in vitro human cadaveric model. Spine. 2005;30:1165–1172. doi: 10.1097/01.brs.0000162441.23824.95.
10)

Eck JC, Humphreys SC, Lim T-H, Jeong ST, Kim JG, Hodges SD, et al. Biomechanical study on the effect of cervical spine fusion on adjacent-level intradiscal pressure and segmental motion. Spine. 2002;27:2431–2434. doi: 10.1097/00007632-200211150-00003.
11)

Fuller DA, Kirkpatrick JS, Emery SE. A kinematic study of the cervical spine before and after segmental arthrodesis. Spine. 1998;23:1649–1656. doi: 10.1097/00007632-199808010-00006.
12)

Park D-H, Ramakrishnan P, Cho T-H, Lorenz E, Eck JC, Humphreys SC, et al. Effect of lower two-level anterior cervical fusion on the superior adjacent level. J Neurosurg Spine. 2007;7:336–340. doi: 10.3171/SPI-07/09/336.
13)

Pospiech J, Stolke D, Wilke HJ, Claes LE. Intradiscal pressure recordings in the cervical spine. Neurosurgery. 1999;44:379–384. doi: 10.1097/00006123-199902000-00078.
14)

Ragab AA, Escarcega AJ, Zdeblick TA. A quantitative analysis of strain at adjacent segments after segmental immobilization of the cervical spine. J Spinal Disord Tech. 2006;19:407–410. doi: 10.1097/00024720-200608000-00006.

Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring in Spine Surgery

Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring in Spine Surgery

The objective of a systematic literature review was to evaluate if intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) can prevent neurological injury during spinal operative surgical procedures.

IONM seems to have presumable positive effects in identifying neurological deficits. However, the role of IONM in the decrease of new neurological deficits remains unclear.

Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and MetaAnalyses (PRISMA) guidelines for systematic reviews and Meta-analysis, Daniel et al., from São Paulo, Brazil, reviewed clinical comparative study who evaluate the rate of new neurological events in patients who had a spinal surgery with and without IONM. Studies were then classified according to their level of evidence. Methodological quality was assessed according to methodological index for non-randomized studies instrument.

Six studies were evaluated comparing neurological events with and without IONM use by the random effects model. There was a great statistical heterogeneity. The pooled odds ratio (OR) was 0.72 {0.71; 1.79}, P = 0.4584. A specific analysis was done for two studies reporting the results of IONM for spinal surgery of intramedullary lesions. The OR was 0.1993 (0.0384; 1.0350), P = 0.0550.

IONM did not result into fewer neurological events with the obtained evidence of the included studies. For intramedullary lesions, there was a trend to fewer neurological events in patients who underwent surgery with IONM. Further prospective randomized studies are necessary to clarify the indications of IONM in spinal surgery 1).

1)

Daniel JW, Botelho RV, Milano JB, Dantas FR, Onishi FJ, Neto ER, Bertolini EF, Borgheresi MAD, Joaquim AF. Intraoperative Neurophysiological Monitoring in Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2018 Aug;43(16):1154-1160. doi: 10.1097/BRS.0000000000002575. PubMed PMID: 30063222.

UpToDate: Temporal horn entrapment

Temporal horn entrapment

Entrapment of the temporal horn, known as isolated lateral ventricle (ILV).

Temporal horn entrapment is a very rare kind of isolated focal non communicating hydrocephalus caused by obstruction at the trigone of the lateral ventricle, which seals off the temporal horn from the rest of the ventricular system 1) 2) 3).

A very thoughtful review of the literature in 2013 reported only 24 cases 4)

In 2017 Guive Sharifi et al published a Review of Literature http://www.jneuro.com/neurology-neuroscience/an-idiopathic-huge-trapped-temporal-horn-surgical-strategy-and-review-of-literature.pdf

Etiology

Obstruction around the trigone of the lateral ventricle caused by inflammations, tumors, infections, or after surgical processes. Most reports are unilateral and acquired.

Treatment

Standard treatment has not yet been established for this condition, and only a few cases have been reported in the literature.

Entrapped temporal horn syndrome secondary to obstructive neoplastic lesions is most frequently treated by surgical excision of the offending lesion.

Golpayegani et al., from the Department of Neurosurgery, Loghman Hakim Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Department of Neurosurgery, Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, TehranIran, reported in 2018 the first congenital case of huge bilateral temporal horn entrapment. A six-month-old boy was admitted with progressive intracranial hypertension who was managed with bilateral ventricular catheters and Y tube connected to one peritoneal catheter 5).


Zhang et al., reviewed their database to report their experience with endoscopic fenestration for treating entrapped temporal horn caused by atrial adhesions. All endoscopic operations performed from February 2015 to December 2016 were reviewed.

Three patients developed temporal horn entrapment after tumor resection. Fenestration was successful in all patients, with a subsequent stomy of the septum pellucidum. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging 1 year later showed a patent reduction of the entrapped horn.

Endoscopic fenestration is an option in the treatment of entrapped temporal horns. However, more experience is required to recommend it as the treatment of choice 6).


Entrapment of the temporal horn, known as isolated lateral ventricle (ILV), is a rare type of noncommunicating focal hydrocephalus, and its standard treatment has not been established.

Hasegawa et al. report two cases of endoscopic surgery for ILV, and highlight the anatomical surgical nuances to avoid associated surgical risks.

The authors present two surgical cases with ILV treated by endoscopic surgery. The first patient with recurrent ILV, due to shunt malfunction, following the initial shunt placement for ILV. In the second patient, the ILV recurred due to choroid plexus inflammation caused by cryptococcal infection. Endoscopic temporal ventriculocisternostomy was effective in both cases. However, in the second case, the choroidal fissure was fenestrated, which led to cerebral infarction in the territory of the choroidal artery zone, attributed to damaging the branches of the choroidal segment of the anterior choroidal artery.

Endoscopic temporal ventriculocisternostomy is considered as a safe and less invasive procedure for treatment of symptomatic ILV. However, the technique is still associated with risks. To avoid complications, it is necessary to be familiar with the anatomy of the choroidal arteries and the pertinent endoscopic intraventricular orientation. Addtitionally, sufficient experience is required before it can be recommended as the treatment of choice 7).


A 76-year-old male presented with altered mental status and left-sided weakness. Noncontrast computed tomography of the head showed a right ganglionic intraparenchymal hemorrhage with resultant entrapment of the temporal horn. Using Robotic Stereotactic Assistance (ROSA), intrahematomal and intraventricular catheters were placed. The temporal horn was immediately decompressed, and the hematoma almost completely resolved with scheduled administration of intrathecal alteplase in the ensuing 48 hours postoperatively.

Frameless image-guided placement of intraparenchymal hematoma catheter using Robotic Stereotactic Assistance is safe and efficient 8)


Paredes et al., reviewed their cases of temporal horn entrapment treated between May 2013 and December 2014 and report their experience with endoscopic temporal ventriculocisternostomy. Four patients were identified (3 adults and 1 child) who underwent this treatment. In 3 patients, the condition developed after tumor resection, and in 1 patient it developed after resection of an arteriovenous malformation. In 1 patient, a recurrent trapped temporal horn developed and a refenestration was successfully performed. No procedure-related complications were observed, and all of the patients remained shunt-free at last follow-up (range 4-24 months). Endoscopic temporal horn ventriculocisternostomy is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of symptomatic temporal horn entrapment in selected cases. However, there is little experience with the procedure to recommend it as the treatment of choice 9).


In 2015 Spallone et al., reported a case of a 58-year-old man who presented with pure Wernicke aphasia (never described before in the albeit rare cases of isolated temporal horn dilatation) that regressed completely following successful ventriculoperitoneal shunting 10).

Chen et al described in 2013 an alternate approach involving temporal horn to prepontine cistern shunting followed by radiosurgery of the offending lesion. This 41-year-old woman with a history of meningiomatosis presented with progressive, incapacitating headache. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed growth of a right trigone meningioma, causing entrapment of the right temporal horn. A ventricular catheter was placed using frame-based stereotaxy and image fusion computed tomography/MRI to connect the entrapped lateral ventricle to the prepontine cistern. The patient reported complete resolution of her symptoms after the procedure.

Postoperative MRI revealed decompression of the temporal horn. The trigonal meningioma was treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. The patient remained asymptomatic at the 2-year follow-up 11).

In 1992 two cases of entrapment of the temporal horn, computed tomography demonstrated the typical appearance of a comma-shaped homogeneous area isodense with water surrounded by a periventricular low-density area. The cause was probably choroid plexitis resulting in obstruction of the cerebrospinal fluid pathway at the atrium. External drainage followed by shunt emplacement was indicated 12).

Maurice-Williams and Choksey reported in 1986 three cases of temporal horn entrapment: A recurrent glioma, a previous tuberculous meningitisand surgical excision of an intracranial arteriovenous malformation which extended into the trigone. Shunting of the trapped temporal horn provided satisfactory treatment 13)

References

1)

Berhouma M, Abderrazek K, Krichen W, Jemel H (2009) Apropos of an unusual and menacing presentation of neurosarcoidosis: The space-occupying trapped temporal horn. Clin Neurol Neurosurg 111: 196-199.

2)

Bohl MA, Almefty KK, Nakaji P (2015) Defining a standardized approach for the bedside insertion of temporal horn external ventricular drains: Procedure development and case series. Neurosurgery 79: 296-304.

3)

Bruck W, Sander U, Blanckenberg P, Friede RL (1991) Symptomatic xanthogranuloma of choroid plexus with unilateral hydrocephalus. Case report. J Neurosurg 75: 324-327.

4)

Krähenbühl AK, Baldauf J, Gaab MR, Schroeder HW. Endoscopic temporal ventriculocisternostomy: an option for the treatment of trapped temporal horns. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2013 May;11(5):568-74. doi: 10.3171/2013.2.PEDS12417. Epub 2013 Mar 22. PubMed PMID: 23521153.

5)

Golpayegani M, Salari F, Anbarlouei M, Habibi Z, Nejat F. Huge bilateral temporal horn entrapment: a congenital abnormality and management. Childs Nerv Syst. 2018 Jul 28. doi: 10.1007/s00381-018-3924-5. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30056473.

6)

Zhang B, Wang X, Li C, Li Z. Neuroendoscopic Fenestration for Entrapped Temporal Horn After Surgery: Report of 3 Cases. World Neurosurg. 2018 Apr;112:77-80. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2018.01.096. Epub 2018 Jan 31. PubMed PMID: 29371166.

7)

Hasegawa T, Ogiwara T, Nagm A, Goto T, Aoyama T, Hongo K. Risks of endoscopic temporal ventriculocisternostomy for isolated lateral ventricle: Anatomical surgical nuances. World Neurosurg. 2017 Nov 15. pii: S1878-8750(17)31959-9. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.11.036. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 29155114.

8)

Alan N, Lee P, Ozpinar A, Gross BA, Jankowitz BT. Robotic Stereotactic Assistance (ROSA) Utilization for Minimally Invasive Placement of Intraparenchymal Hematoma and Intraventricular Catheters. World Neurosurg. 2017 Dec;108:996.e7-996.e10. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.09.027. Epub 2017 Sep 14. PubMed PMID: 28919568.

9)

Paredes I, Orduna J, Fustero D, Salgado JA, de Diego JM, de Mesa FG. Endoscopic temporal ventriculocisternostomy for the management of temporal horn entrapment: report of 4 cases. J Neurosurg. 2017 Jan;126(1):298-303. doi: 10.3171/2016.1.JNS152248. Epub 2016 Apr 15. PubMed PMID: 27081903.

10)

Spallone A, Belvisi D, Marsili L. Entrapment of the Temporal Horn as a Cause of Pure Wernicke Aphasia: Case Report. J Neurol Surg Rep. 2015 Jul;76(1):e109-12. doi: 10.1055/s-0035-1549225. Epub 2015 May 13. PubMed PMID: 26251784; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4520970.

11)

Chen CC, Kasper EM, Zinn PO, Warnke PC. Management of entrapped temporal horn by temporal horn to prepontine cistern shunting. World Neurosurg. 2013 Feb;79(2):404.e7-10. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2011.02.025. Epub 2011 Nov 7. PubMed PMID: 22120406.

12)

Tsugane R, Shimoda M, Yamaguchi T, Yamamoto I, Sato O. Entrapment of the temporal horn: a form of focal non-communicating hydrocephalus caused by intraventricular block of cerebrospinal fluid flow–report of two cases. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo). 1992 Apr;32(4):210-4. Review. PubMed PMID: 1378565.

13)

Maurice-Williams RS, Choksey M. Entrapment of the temporal horn: a form of focal obstructive hydrocephalus. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1986 Mar;49(3):238-42. PubMed PMID: 3958736; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1028721.

UpToDate: Brachial plexus injury epidemiology

Brachial plexus injury epidemiology

Epidemiological studies of traumatic brachial plexus injuries are few and most of them focus on treatment and prognosis.

A study of 2018 from Rasulić et al., in surgically treated civilian traumatic brachial plexus injuries in Serbia, there were seven different etiological factors. The road traffic accidents were the most common-41 (60.3%), while the motorcycle accidents were the most dominant subtype (53.7%) of all road traffic accidents, and also representing 32.4% of all causes of trauma. Supraclavicular elements of the brachial plexus were injured in more than 80% of patients. A total of 49 (72.1%) patients from the study had one or more associated injuries. The most common associated injuries were bone fractures, cerebral contusions, and vascular injuries 1).

In 2014 a analysis of the epidemiological characteristics of patients with traumatic brachial plexus lesions in São Paulo, Brazil, the sixth largest city in the world.

This was a retrospective analysis of the epidemiological characteristics of patients submitted to surgical treatment of traumatic brachial plexus lesions in the Peripheral Nerve Surgery Unit of the Department of Neurosurgery of the University of São Paulo Medical School.

In the period from 2004 to 2012, 406 patients underwent surgery. There were 384 (94.6 %) men and 22 (5.4 %) women. In 45.9 % the compromised plexus was the right and in 54.1 %, the left. The average age was 28.38 years. Among the causes, the most frequent was motorcycle accidents (79 %). Most of the lesions were supraclavicular. In 46.1 % of cases the lesions were complete, in 30.1 % the lesions compromised C5/C6 roots, in 20.9 % the C5/C6/C7 roots were lesioned and in 2.9 % the lesion was in the lower roots, C8/T1. Among the associated lesions the most prevalent were head trauma, observed in 34.2 % of the cases; lesions of long bones in 38.8 %; clavicle fractures in 25.9 %; and thoracic trauma in 12.9 %.

In a population of adult patients with brachial plexus lesions with surgical indication, most of them comprise young male adults involved in high-energy motorcycle accidents 2).

Jain in 2012 wanted to know the situation in an Indian centre. Data regarding age, sex, affected side, mode of injury, distribution of paralysis, associated injuries, pain at the time of presentation and the index procedure they underwent were collected from 304 patients. Additional data like the vehicle associated during the accident, speed of the vehicle during the accident, employment status and integration into the family were collected in 144 patients out of the 304 patients.

Road traffic accidents accounted for 94% of patients and of the road traffic accidents 90% involved two wheelers. Brachial plexus injury formed a part of multitrauma in 54% of this study group and 46% had isolated brachial plexus injury. Associated injuries like fractures, vascular injuries and head injuries are much less probably due to the lower velocity of the vehicles compared to the western world. The average time interval from the date of injury to exploration of the brachial plexus was 127 days and 124 (40.78%) patients presented to us within this duration. Fifty-seven per cent had joined back to work by an average of 8.6 months. It took an average of 6.8 months for the global brachial plexus-injured patients to write in their non-dominant hand 3).

In 2010 the aim of a study of Dorsi et al., was to estimate the prevalence of brachial plexus injury (BPI) in pediatric multitrauma patients.

The National Pediatric Trauma Registry was queried using the ICD-9 code 953.4, injury to brachial plexus, to identify cases of BPI. The patient demographics, mechanism of trauma, and associated ICD-9 diagnoses were analyzed.

Brachial plexus injuries were identified in 113 (0.1%) of the 103,434 injured children entered in the registry between April 1, 1985, and March 31, 2002. Sixty-nine patients (61%) were male. Injuries were most often caused by motor vehicle accidents involving passengers (36 cases [32%]) or pedestrians (19 cases [17%]). Head injuries were diagnosed in 47% of children and included concussion in 27%, intracranial bleeds in 21%, and skull fractures in 14%. Upper-extremity vascular injury occurred in 16%. The most common musculoskeletal injuries were fractures of the humerus (16%), ribs (16%), clavicle (13%), and scapula (11%). Spinal fractures occurred in 12% of patients, and spinal cord injury occurred in 4%. The Injury Severity Score ranged from 1 to 75, with a mean score of 10, and 6 patients (5%) died as a result of injuries sustained during a traumatic event.

Brachial plexus injuries occur in 0.1% of pediatric multitrauma patients. Motor vehicle accidents and pedestrians struck by a motor vehicle are the most common reasons for BPIs in this population. Common associated injuries include head injuries, upper-extremity vascular injuries, and fractures of the spine, humerus, ribs, scapula, and clavicle 4).

In 2006 a study of Flores from the Unidade de Neurocirurgia, Hospital de Base do Distrito Federal, Brasília, Brazil most of the lesions were supraclavicular (62%). Twenty-one cases occurred due to traction (60%), 9 to gun shot wound (25%), 3 to compression (8.5%) and two perforation/laceration (5.7%). Motorcycle accidents were the cause of trauma in 54% of patients. CT myelography demonstrated root avulsion in 16 cases (76%). Partial spontaneous neurological recovery was observed in 43% of the patients. Neuropathic pain occurred in 25 (71%) cases, and the use of some oral intake drugs (as amitriptyline or carbamazepine) controlled it in 64% of times.

Traction is the most frequent mechanism related to brachial plexus injuries, and root avulsions are common in this cases. Pain and concomitant lesions are frequently observed in these group. In this series, the rate of incidence to the local population was 1.75/100000/year. 5).

In 1997 Midha published that Brachial plexus injury afflict slightly more than 1% of multitrauma victims. Motorcycle and snowmobile accidents carry especially high risks, with the incidence of injury approaching 5%. Head injuries, thoracic injuries, and fractures and dislocations affecting the shoulder girdle and cervical spine are particularly common associated injuries. Supraclavicular injuries are more common, are of more severe grade, more often require surgery, and are associated with worse prognosis, compared with infraclavicular injuries 6).

References

1)

Rasulić L, Savić A, Lepić M, Puzović V, Karaleić S, Kovačević V, Vitošević F, Samardžić M. Epidemiological characteristics of surgically treated civilian traumatic brachial plexus injuries in Serbia. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2018 Jul 29. doi: 10.1007/s00701-018-3640-7. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30056518.
2)

Faglioni W Jr, Siqueira MG, Martins RS, Heise CO, Foroni L. The epidemiology of adult traumatic brachial plexus lesions in a large metropolis. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2014 May;156(5):1025-8. doi: 10.1007/s00701-013-1948-x. Epub 2013 Dec 7. PubMed PMID: 24318512.
3)

Jain DK, Bhardwaj P, Venkataramani H, Sabapathy SR. An epidemiological study of traumatic brachial plexus injury patients treated at an Indian centre. Indian J Plast Surg. 2012 Sep;45(3):498-503. doi: 10.4103/0970-0358.105960. PubMed PMID: 23449838; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3580349.
4)

Dorsi MJ, Hsu W, Belzberg AJ. Epidemiology of brachial plexus injury in the pediatric multitrauma population in the United States. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2010 Jun;5(6):573-7. doi: 10.3171/2010.3.PEDS09538. PubMed PMID: 20515329.
5)

Flores LP. [Epidemiological study of the traumatic brachial plexus injuries in adults]. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2006 Mar;64(1):88-94. Epub 2006 Apr 5. Portuguese. PubMed PMID: 16622560.
6)

Midha R. Epidemiology of brachial plexus injuries in a multitrauma population. Neurosurgery. 1997 Jun;40(6):1182-8; discussion 1188-9. PubMed PMID: 9179891.

UpToDate: ACTC1

ACTC1

ACTC1 encodes cardiac muscle alpha actin. This isoform differs from the alpha actin that is expressed in skeletal muscle, ACTA1. Alpha cardiac actin is the major protein of the thin filament in cardiac sarcomeres, which are responsible for muscle contraction and generation of force to support the pump function of the heart.

Actins are highly conserved proteins that are involved in various types of cell motility. Polymerization of globular actin (G-actin) leads to a structural filament (F-actin) in the form of a two-stranded helix. Each actin can bind to four others. The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the actin family which is comprised of three main groups of actin isoforms, alpha, beta, and gamma. The alpha actins are found in muscle tissues and are a major constituent of the contractile apparatus. Defects in this gene have been associated with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) and familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC).

ACTC1, could function as a prognostic and predictive marker in clinical treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI) 1).

ACTC1 may serve as a novel independent prognostic and invasion marker in glioblastoma GBM 2).

A study of Wanibuchi et al., from the Department of Neurosurgery, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Hokkaido Japan aimed to clarify whether the knockdown of highly expressed ACTC1 can inhibit the migratory capacity of cells in the GBM cell line.

ACTC1 expression was examined using immunocytochemistry and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction. The motility of GBM cells that were either treated with siRNA to knock down ACTC1 or untreated were investigated using a time-lapse study in vitro.

The relatively high ACTC1 expression was confirmed in a GBM cell line, i.e., U87MG. The ACTC1 expression in U87MG cells was significantly inhibited by ACTC1-siRNA (p < 0.05). A cell movement tracking assay using time-lapse imaging demonstrated the inhibition of U87MG cell migration by ACTC1 knockdown. The quantitative cell migration analysis demonstrated that the distance traversed during 72 h was 3607 ± 458 (median ± SD) μm by untreated U87MG cells and 3570 ± 748 μm by negative control siRNA-treated cells. However, the distance migrated by ACTC1-siRNA-treated cells during 72 h was significantly shorter (1265 ± 457 μm, p < 0.01) than the controls.

ACTC1 knockdown inhibits U87MG cell migration. 3).

1)

Liu Y, Wang Y, Teng Z, Zhang X, Ding M, Zhang Z, Chen J, Xu Y. DNA Microarray Analysis in Screening Features of Genes Involved in Spinal Cord Injury. Med Sci Monit. 2016 May 10;22:1571-81. PubMed PMID: 27160807; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4913819.
2)

Ohtaki S, Wanibuchi M, Kataoka-Sasaki Y, Sasaki M, Oka S, Noshiro S, Akiyama Y, Mikami T, Mikuni N, Kocsis JD, Honmou O. ACTC1 as an invasion and prognosis marker in glioma. J Neurosurg. 2016 Apr 15:1-9. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 27081897.
3)

Wanibuchi M, Ohtaki S, Ookawa S, Kataoka-Sasaki Y, Sasaki M, Oka S, Kimura Y, Akiyama Y, Mikami T, Mikuni N, Kocsis JD, Honmou O. Actin, alpha, cardiac muscle 1 (ACTC1) knockdown inhibits the migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro. J Neurol Sci. 2018 Jul 17;392:117-121. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2018.07.013. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30055382.

UpToDate: Positron emission tomography for intracranial meningioma

Positron emission tomography for intracranial meningioma

MET PET/CT showed a high sensitivity compared with FDG PET/CT for detection of newly diagnosed WHO grades I and II intracranial meningiomas. Both FDG and MET uptake were found to be useful for evaluating tumor proliferation in meningiomas 1).

Although positron emission tomography has not been routinely used in the diagnostic workup and follow-up of patients with meningiomas, it can be useful in cases of skull base meningiomas that are frequently difficult to visualize by using standard CT and MR imaging techniques 2).

Primary intracranial meningioma is typically reported as having low FDG uptake, because glucose metabolism in meningioma is similar to that of surrounding tissue 3).

There have been a few isolated reports describing the imaging features of metastatic meningioma on FDG-PET imaging. Ghodsian et al., described a moderately hypermetabolic sacral metastatic mass by FDG-PET/CT. This was a Grade III malignant meningioma on histology 4).

Meirelles et al., described a pulmonary meningioma that manifested as a solitary pulmonary nodule and had very high metabolic activity on PET scan. The current case also showed avid uptake of FDG; the SUV was >7 in each pulmonary lesion. The uptake was more avid in the periphery and slightly less in the centre of both lesions, corresponding to the central areas of low density on CT. It was useful to note that there were no other foci of abnormal FDG uptake elsewhere to suggest other metastases. It is reassuring to note that 10 months after the PET/CT with clinical follow-up, the patient remains asymptomatic with no evidence of local or distant spread. The diagnosis of pulmonary metastatic meningioma was confirmed histologically by CT-guided percutaneous biopsy, which has been previously reported 5).


In 2007, Rutten et al., described the combination of CT and MRI as limited in the diagnosis of local skull involvement from adjacent intracranial meningioma. In their study, the authors demonstrated that skull base tumors could be clearly visualised with 18Ftyrosine PET, even after radiation therapy 6) 7).

Meningiomas are also known to have high somatostatin receptor density allowing for the potential use of octreotide brain scintigraphy to help delineate extent of disease. This may be particularly useful in distinguishing residual tumor from postoperative scarring in subtotally resected/recurrent tumors 8).

References

1)

Mitamura K, Yamamoto Y, Norikane T, Hatakeyama T, Okada M, Nishiyama Y. Correlation of (18)F-FDG and (11)C-methionine uptake on PET/CT with Ki-67 immunohistochemistry in newly diagnosed intracranial meningiomas. Ann Nucl Med. 2018 Jul 21. doi: 10.1007/s12149-018-1284-6. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30032455.

2)

Rockhill J, Mrugala M, Chamberlain MC. Intracranial meningiomas: an overview of diagnosis and treatment. Neurosurg Focus. 2007;23(4):E1. Review. PubMed PMID: 17961033.

3)

Kaminski JM, Movsas B, King E, Yang C, Kronz JD, Alli PM, et al. Metastatic meningioma to the lung with multiple pleural metastases. Am J Clin Oncol 2001;24:579–82

4)

Ghodsian M, Obrzut SL, Hyde CC, Watts WJ, Schiepers C. Evaluation of metastatic meningioma with 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-d-glucose PET/CT. Clin Nucl Med 2005;30:717–20

5)

Brennan C, O’Connor OJ, O’Regan KN, Keohane C, Dineen J, Hinchion J, Sweeney B, Maher MM. Metastatic meningioma: positron emission tomography CT imaging findings. Br J Radiol. 2010 Dec;83(996):e259-62. doi: 10.1259/bjr/11276652. PubMed PMID: 21088084; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3473618.

6)

Rutten I, Cabay JE, Withofs N, Lemaire C, Aerts J, Baart V, et al.: PET/CT of skull base meningiomas using 2–18F-fluoro-L-tyro-sine: initial report. J Nucl Med 48:720–5, 2007

7)

Conti PS, Cham DK, editors. Singapore: Springer; 2005. PET/CT: a case based approach book.

8)

Klutmann S, Bohuslavizki KH, Brenner W, Behnke A, Tietje N, Kröger S, et al.: Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in postsurgical follow-up examinations of meningioma. J Nucl Med 39:1913–1917, 1998

Christopher R. Honey

Christopher R. Honey

Christopher R. Honey et al., from the University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanadadescribed a condition, hemilaryngopharyngeal spasm (HELPS), which can cause severe episodic stridor leading to unconsciousness in association with cough. The first recognized and surgically cured patient with HELPS was reported in 2017 1).

Three additional patients have been followed up for at least a year postoperatively.

Each patient presented with a similar pattern of episodic coughing and choking that increased in frequency, severity, and duration over years. The episodes eventually occurred while sleeping and could cause severe stridor with loss of consciousness. All three patients were initially misdiagnosed with a psychiatric illness and subjected to multiple intubations and one tracheostomy. Unilateral botulinum toxin injections in the vocal fold eased the severity of the throat contractions but not the cough. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a looping posterior inferior cerebellar artery juxtaposed to a vagus nerve in each case. Microvascular decompression (MVD) of that vessel relieved all symptoms. The introduction of this new medical condition may help a small cohort of patients with inducible laryngeal obstructions that have not responded to the current standard treatments. Patients are asymptomatic between episodes of progressively severe coughing and choking with stridor that may lead to intubation. Severe anxiety about the unpredictable symptoms is expected and may contribute to a psychiatric misdiagnosis. Microvascular decompression for HELPS is more difficult than that for trigeminal neuralgia because the involved nerve is more susceptible to manipulation. Ultimately, the final proof that HELPS is a real and distinct syndrome will require its recognition and successful treatment by colleagues around the world 2).

References

1)

Honey CR, Gooderham, P, Morrison, M, Ivanishvili, Z: Episodic hemilaryngopharyngeal spasm (HELPS) syndrome: case report of a surgically treatable novel neuropathy. J Neurosurg 126:1653–1656, 2017
2)

Honey CR, Morrison MD, Heran MKS, Dhaliwal BS. Hemi-laryngopharyngeal spasm as a novel cause of inducible laryngeal obstruction with a surgical cure: report of 3 cases. J Neurosurg. 2018 Jul 20:1-5. doi: 10.3171/2018.2.JNS172952. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30028264.
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