Minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion for adult spinal deformity

A multicenter retrospective review of a minimally invasive adult spinal deformity database was queried with a minimum of 2-yr follow-up. Patients were divided into 2 groups as determined by the side of the curve from which the LLIF was performed: concave or convex.

No differences between groups were noted in demographic, and preoperative or postoperative radiographic parameters (all P > .05). There were 8 total complications in the convex group (34.8%) and 21 complications in the concave group (52.5%; P = .17). A subgroup analysis was performed in 49 patients in whom L4-5 was in the primary curve and not in the fractional curve. In this subset of patients, there were 6 complications in the convex group (31.6%) compared to 19 in the concave group (63.3%; P < .05) and both groups experienced significant improvements in coronal Cobb angle, Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analog Scale score with no difference between groups.

Patients undergoing LLIF for ADS had no statistically significant clinical or operative complication rates regardless of a concave or convex approach to the curve. Clinical outcomes and coronal plane deformity improved regardless of approach side. However, in cases wherein L4-5 is in the primary curve, approaching the fractional curve at L4-5 from the concavity may be associated with a higher complication rate compared to a convex approach 1).


Park et al., evaluated the clinical and radiological efficacies of supplementing minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) with open posterior spinal fusion (PSF) in adult spinal deformity (ASD).

To evaluate the advantages of minimally invasive LLIF for ASD, patients who underwent minimally invasive LLIF followed by open PSF (combined group) were compared with patients who only underwent PSF (only PSF group). The clinical and radiological outcomes for deformity correction and indirect decompression were assessed. The occurrence of proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) and proximal junctional failure (PJF) were also evaluated.

No significant differences were observed in the clinical outcomes of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analog scale, and major complications including reoperations between the groups. No additional advantage was found for coronal deformity correction, but the restoration of lumbar lordosis in the combined group was significantly higher postoperatively (15.3° vs. 8.87°, P = 0.003) and last follow-up (6.69° vs. 1.02°, P = 0.029) compared to that of the only PSF group. In the subgroup analysis for indirect decompression for the combined group, a significant increase of canal area (104 vs. 122 mm) and foraminal height (16.2 vs. 18.5 mm) was noted. The occurrence of PJK or PJF was significantly higher in the combined group than in the only PSF group (P = 0.039).

LLIF has advantages of indirect decompression and greater improvements of sagittal correction compared to only posterior surgery. LLIF should be conducted considering the above-mentioned benefits and complications including PJK or PJF in ASD 2).

References

1)

Kanter AS, Tempel ZJ, Agarwal N, Hamilton DK, Zavatsky JM, Mundis GM, Tran S, Chou D, Park P, Uribe JS, Wang MY, Anand N, Eastlack R, Mummaneni PV, Okonkwo DO. Curve Laterality for Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Adult Scoliosis Surgery: The Concave Versus Convex Controversy. Neurosurgery. 2018 Dec 1;83(6):1219-1225. doi: 10.1093/neuros/nyx612. PubMed PMID: 29361052.
2)

Park HY, Ha KY, Kim YH, Chang DG, Kim SI, Lee JW, Ahn JH, Kim JB. Minimally Invasive Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Adult Spinal Deformity: Clinical and Radiological Efficacy With Minimum Two Years Follow-up. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2018 Jul 15;43(14):E813-E821. doi: 10.1097/BRS.0000000000002507. PubMed PMID: 29215493.

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