Microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia outcome

Microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia outcome

Microvascular decompression (MVD) is the most effective long-term surgical treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) patients. The risk factors for poor pain control following MVD surgery are not fully understood.


A significant proportion of patients with significant neurovascular compression fail to achieve long-term pain relief after technically successful surgery. Neuroimaging using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a non-invasive method to generate objective biomarkers of eventual response to TN surgery 1).


Younger patients with TN had worse long-term pain outcomes following MVD. Additional factors associated with postoperative recurrence included poor preoperative pain control (BNI score > IV) and multivessel compression. Furthermore, SCA combined with PV was confirmed to be associated with a worse outcome 2).


Not all patients with TN manifest unequivocal neurovascular compression (NVC). Furthermore, over time patients with an initially successful MVD manifest a relentless rate of TN recurrence.

It does not achieve 100 % cure rate. Re-exploration of the posterior fossa may carry increased risk over first-time MVD and is not always successful, so other treatments are needed.


Age itself does not seem to represent a major contraindication of microvascular decompression for typical trigeminal neuralgia 3).

Patients 60 yr of age and older have significantly better long-term pain outcomes following MVD than younger patients 4).


1)

Wang Z, Zhao Z, Song Z, Wang Y, Zhao Z. The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the prediction of surgical outcomes in trigeminal neuralgia. Postgrad Med. 2022 May 3:1-7. doi: 10.1080/00325481.2022.2067612. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35503235.
2)

Shi J, Qian Y, Han W, Dong B, Mao Y, Cao J, Guan W, Zhou Q. Risk factors for outcomes following microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia. World Neurosurg. 2020 Jan 17. pii: S1878-8750(20)30100-5. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2020.01.082. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31958591.
3)

Mastronardi L, Caputi F, Rinaldi A, Cacciotti G, Roperto R, Scavo CG, Stati G, Sufianov A. Typical Trigeminal Neuralgia: Comparison of Results between Patients Older and Younger than 65 Operated on with Microvascular Decompression by Retrosigmoid Approach. J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg. 2019 Aug 29. doi: 10.1055/s-0039-1693126. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31466107.
4)

Bick SK, Huie D, Sneh G, Eskandar EN. Older Patients Have Better Pain Outcomes Following Microvascular Decompression for Trigeminal Neuralgia. Neurosurgery. 2019 Jan 1;84(1):116-122. doi: 10.1093/neuros/nyy011. PubMed PMID: 29562363.

Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease

Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease

Subthalamic deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease.


Cramer et al. from the University of Minnesota, sought to determine whether racial and socioeconomic disparity in the utilization of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson’s disease (PD) have improved over time. They examined DBS utilization and analyzed factors associated with placement of DBS. The odds of DBS placement increased across the study period while White PD patients were 5 times more likely than Black patients to undergo DBS. Individuals, regardless of racial background, with two or more comorbidities were 14 times less likely to undergo DBS. Privately insured patients were 1.6 times more likely to undergo DBS. Despite increasing DBS utilization, significant disparities persist in access to DBS 1).

Modified power-on programming method.

Traditional power-on programming method.

Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease Indications.

Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease outcome.

Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease case series.


1)

Cramer SW, Do TH, Palzer EF, Naik A, Rice AL, Novy SG, Hanson JT, Piazza AN, Howard MA, Huling JD, Chen CC, McGovern RA. Persistent racial disparities in deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease. Ann Neurol. 2022 Apr 19. doi: 10.1002/ana.26378. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35439848.

American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery

American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery

https://www.assfn.org/

Magnetic resonance image-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a tool in the neurosurgical armamentarium for the management of drug-resistant epilepsy. Given the introduction of this technology, the American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery (ASSFN), which acts as the joint section representing the field of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery on behalf of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, provides here the expert consensus opinion on evidence-based best practices for the use and implementation of this treatment modality. Indications for treatment are outlined, consisting of failure to respond to, or intolerance of, at least 2 appropriately chosen medications at appropriate doses for disabling, localization-related epilepsy in the setting of well-defined epileptogenic foci, or critical pathways of seizure propagation accessible by MRgLITT. Applications of MRgLITT in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and hypothalamic hamartoma, along with its contraindications in the treatment of epilepsy, are discussed based on current evidence. To put this position statement in perspective, they detailed the evidence and authority on which this ASSFN position statement is based 1)

A persistent underuse of epilepsy surgery exists. Neuromodulation treatments including deep brain stimulation (DBS) expand the surgical options for patients with epilepsy and provide options for patients who are not candidates for resective surgery. DBS of the bilateral anterior nucleus of the thalamus is an Food and Drug Administration-approved, safe, and efficacious treatment option for patients with refractory focal epilepsy. The purpose of this consensus position statement is to summarize evidence, provide recommendations, and identify indications and populations for future investigation in Deep Brain Stimulation for epilepsy. The recommendations of the American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery are based on several randomized and blinded clinical trials with high-quality data to support the use of DBS to the anterior nucleus of the thalamus for the treatment of refractory focal-onset seizures.

Cabrera et al. designed a 51-question online survey comprising Likert-type, multiple-choice, and rank-order questions and distributed it to members of the American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery (ASSFN). Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed on the data.

They received 38 completed surveys. Half (n = 19) of responders reported devoting at least a portion of their clinical practice to psychiatric neurosurgery, utilizing DBS and treating obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) most frequently overall. Respondents indicated that psychiatric neurosurgery is more medically effective (OR 0, p = 0.03242, two-sided Fisher’s exact test) and has clearer clinical indications for the treatment of OCD than for the treatment of depression (OR 0.09775, p = 0.005137, two-sided Fisher’s exact test). Seventy-one percent of all respondents (n = 27) supported the clinical utility of ablative surgery in modern neuropsychiatric practice, 87% (n = 33) agreed that ablative procedures constitute a valid treatment alternative to DBS for some patients, and 61% (n = 23) agreed that ablative surgery may be an acceptable treatment option for patients who are unlikely to comply with postoperative care.

This up-to-date account of practices, perceptions, and predictions about psychiatric neurosurgery contributes to the knowledge about evolving attitudes over time and informs priorities for education and further surgical innovation on the psychiatric neurosurgery landscape 2).

2022 AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR STEREOTACTIC AND FUNCTIONAL NEUROSURGERY BIENNIAL MEETING

2016 Biennial Meeting of the American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Chicago, IL, USA, June 18-21, 2016: Abstracts 3)


1)

Wu C, Schwalb JM, Rosenow JM, McKhann GM 2nd, Neimat JS; American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgeons. The American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery Position Statement on Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for the Treatment of Drug-Resistant Epilepsy. Neurosurgery. 2022 Feb 1;90(2):155-160. doi: 10.1227/NEU.0000000000001799. PMID: 34995216.
2)

Cabrera LY, Courchesne C, Kiss ZHT, Illes J. Clinical Perspectives on Psychiatric Neurosurgery. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. 2019;97(5-6):391-398. doi: 10.1159/000505080. Epub 2020 Jan 17. PMID: 31955163.
3)

2016 Biennial Meeting of the American Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Chicago, IL, USA, June 18-21, 2016: Abstracts. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. 2017 Jan 16;94 Suppl 2:1-77. doi: 10.1159/000455386. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28092908.
WhatsApp WhatsApp us
%d bloggers like this: