Korle-Bu Neuroscience Foundation

Korle-Bu Neuroscience Foundation

https://kbnf.org/

Korle-Bu Neuroscience Foundation (KBNF) is a Canada based charity enhancing the delivery of quality brain and spinal medical care in West Africa and beyond. The vision is to alleviate the suffering of West Africans with a special focus on those affected by diseases of the brain and spine, and to address related health care issues.


KBNF has been working with the Liberian Government since 2014 to develop its neurosurgery capacity, but the program is still in its infancy suffering setbacks from Ebola, lack of trained medical professionals across all disciplines, and extremely limited resources. KBNF works to address these deficits with shipments of equipment and supplies and annual medical missions.

Liberia recently employed the first neurosurgeon in the country‘s history. In a country with a population of 4.7 million people and staggering rates of cranial and spine trauma, as well as hydrocephalus and neural tube defects, neurosurgery is considered a luxury. A study documents the experience of a team of neurosurgeons, critical care nurses, scrub technicians, nurses, and Biomedical engineering who carried out a series of neurosurgical clinics and complex brain and spine surgeries in Liberia. Specifically, Bowen et al. aimed to highlight some of the larger obstacles, beyond staff and equipment, facing the development of a neurosurgical or any other specialty practice in Liberia.

The institutions, in collaboration with the Korle-Bu Neuroscience Foundation, spent 10 days in Liberia, based in Tappita, and performed 18 surgeries in addition to seeing several hundred clinic patients. This is a retrospective review of the cases performed along with outcomes to investigate obstacles in providing neurosurgical services in the country.

Before arriving in Liberia, they evaluated, planned, and supplied staff and materials for treating complex neurosurgical patients. Sixteen patients underwent 18 surgeries at a hospital in Tappita, Liberia, in November 2018. Their ages ranged from 1 month to 72 years (average 20 years). Five patients (28%) were female. Ten patients (56%) were under the age of 18. Surgeries included ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VP-shunt), lumbar myelomeningocele repairencephalocele repairlaminectomy, and a craniotomy for tumor resection. Ten patients (55%) underwent VP-shunting. Two patients (11%) had a craniotomy for tumor resection. Three patients (17%) had laminectomy for lumbar stenosis. Two patients (11%) had repair of lumbar myelomeningocele.

After an aggressive and in-depth approach to planning, conducting, and supplying complex neurosurgical procedures in Liberia, the greatest limiting factor to successful outcomes lie in real-time is access to health care, which is largely limited by overall infrastructure. The study documents the experience of a team of neurosurgeons, critical care nurses, scrub technicians, nurses, and biomedical engineers who carried out a series of neurosurgical clinics and complex brain and spine surgeries in Liberia. Specifically, they aimed to highlight some of the larger obstacles, beyond staff and equipment, facing the development of a neurosurgical or any other specialty procedural practice in the country of Liberia. Most notably, they focused on infrastructure factors, including power, roads, water, education, and overall health care 1).


1)

Bowen I, Toor H, Zampella B, Doe A, King C, Miulli DE. Infrastructural Limitations in Establishing Neurosurgical Specialty Services in Liberia. Cureus. 2022 Sep 20;14(9):e29373. doi: 10.7759/cureus.29373. PMID: 36284802; PMCID: PMC9584543.

Anterior communicating artery aneurysm endovascular treatment complications

Anterior communicating artery aneurysm endovascular treatment complications

Intraprocedural aneurysm rupture and thrombus formation are serious complications during coiling of ruptured intracranial aneurysms, and they more often occur in patients with anterior communicating artery aneurysms.

It is associated with a high rate of complete angiographic occlusion. However, the procedure-related permanent morbidity and mortality are not negligible for aneurysms in this location 1).


Delgado Acosta et al. from Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía aimed to report the characteristics of patients suffering intra- or peri-procedural ruptures during embolization of cerebral aneurysms.

Between March 1994 and October 2021, 648 consecutive cerebral aneurysms were treated by the endovascular procedureMedical records were reviewed retrospectively with emphasis on procedure description, potential risk factors, and clinical outcomes related to intra- or peri-procedural rupture.

Of the 648 patients, 17 (2.6%) suffered an intra- or peri-procedural hemorrhagic event. The most common location was the anterior communicating artery. There was no significant difference between previously ruptured and unruptured aneurysms in the incidence of bleeding. In four patients, bleeding was evident within 24 h after the procedure. The clinical evolution at three months was poor and only four patients presented a positive evolution. There were 11 deaths (64.71%). Balloon remodeling was associated with an increased frequency of ruptures, while stenting was a safer treatment.

Aneurysm rupture during endovascular therapy is unpredictable, and its occurrence can be devastating. The incidence is quite low although the outcome is frequently poor. Early detection and proper management, including prompt occlusion of the aneurysm, are important to achieve a positive outcome. Anterior communicating artery aneurysms and those treated with balloon catheters have a higher incidence of rupture. A small number of ruptures of uncertain origin occur that go unnoticed in digital subtraction angiograms 2).


The immediate and long-term outcomes, complications, recurrences and the need for retreatment were analyzed in a series of 280 consecutive patients with anterior communicating artery aneurysms treated with the endovascular technique. From October 1992 to October 2001 280 patients with 282 anterior communicating artery aneurysms were addressed to our center. For the analysis, the population was divided into two major groups: group 1, comprising 239 (85%) patients with ruptured aneurysms and group 2 comprising of 42 (15%) patients with unruptured aneurysms. In group 1, 185 (77.4%) patients had a good initial pre-treatment Hunt and Hess grade of I-III. Aneurysm size was divided into three categories according to the larger diameter: less than 4 mm, between 4 and 10 mm and larger than 10 mm. The sizes of aneurysms in groups 1 and 2 were identical but a less favorable neck to depth ratio of 0.5 was more frequent in group 2. Endovascular treatment was finally performed in 234 patients in group 1 and 34 patients in group 2. Complete obliteration was more frequently obtained in group 2 unlike a residual neck or opacification of the sac that were more frequently seen in group 1. No peri-treatment complications were recorded in group 2. In group 1 the peri-treatment mortality and overall peri-treatment morbidity were 5.1% and 8.1% respectively. Eight patients (3.4%) in group 1 presented early post treatment rebleeding with a mortality of 88%. The mean time to follow-up was 3.09 years. In group 1, 51 (21.7%) recurrences occurred of which 14 were minor and 37 major. In group 2, eight (23.5%) recurrences occurred, five minor and three major. Two patients (0.8%) presented late rebleeding in group 1. Twenty-seven second endovascular retreatments were performed, 24 (10.2%) in group 1 and three (8.8%) in group 2, seven third endovascular retreatments and two surgical clippings in group 1 only. There was no additional morbidity related to retreatments. Endovascular treatment is an effective method for the treatment of anterior communicating artery aneurysms allowing late rebleeding prevention. Peri-treatment rebleeding warrants caution in anticoagulation management. This is a single center experience and the follow-up period is limited. Patients should be followed-up in the long-term as recurrences may occur and warrant additional treatment 3).


Prolonged anterograde amnesia and disorientation after anterior communicating artery aneurysm coil embolization 4)


LVIS stent-assisted coiling for ruptured wide-necked ACoA aneurysms was safe and effective, with a relatively low rate of perioperative complications and a high rate of complete occlusion at follow-up 5)


1)

Fang S, Brinjikji W, Murad MH, Kallmes DF, Cloft HJ, Lanzino G. Endovascular treatment of anterior communicating artery aneurysms: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2014 May;35(5):943-7. doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A3802. Epub 2013 Nov 28. PMID: 24287090; PMCID: PMC7964525.
2)

Delgado Acosta F, Bravo Rey I, Jiménez Gómez E, Saucedo VR, Toledano A, Oteros Fernández R. Intra- or peri-procedural rupture in the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Acta Neurol Scand. 2022 Aug 17. doi: 10.1111/ane.13686. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35975464.
3)

Finitsis S, Anxionnat R, Lebedinsky A, Albuquerque PC, Clayton MF, Picard L, Bracard S. Endovascular treatment of ACom intracranial aneurysms. Report on series of 280 patients. Interv Neuroradiol. 2010 Mar;16(1):7-16. doi: 10.1177/159101991001600101. Epub 2010 Mar 25. PMID: 20377974; PMCID: PMC3277962.
4)

Al-Atrache Z, Friedler B, Shaikh HA, Kavi T. Prolonged anterograde amnesia and disorientation after anterior communicating artery aneurysm coil embolisation. BMJ Case Rep. 2019 Jul 30;12(7). pii: e230543. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2019-230543. PubMed PMID: 31366616.
5)

Xue G, Liu P, Xu F, Fang Y, Li Q, Hong B, Xu Y, Liu J, Huang Q. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Wide-Necked Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms Using a Low-Profile Visualized Intraluminal Support (LVIS) Device. Front Neurol. 2021 Jan 28;11:611875. doi: 10.3389/fneur.2020.611875. PMID: 33584512; PMCID: PMC7876256.

terior communicating artery aneurysm endovascular treatment complications

Rhino orbital cerebral mucormycosis

Rhino orbital cerebral mucormycosis

The second COVID-19 wave in India has been associated with an unprecedented increase in cases of COVID-19 associated mucormycosis (CAM), mainly Rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis (ROCM).

Rhino orbital cerebral mucormycosis rapidly became an epidemic following the COVID-19 pandemic 1)

Gutiérrez-Delgado et al searched PubMed database from 1964 to 2014 for all available articles in the English language related to rhino-orbital-cerebral chronic infections caused by fungi of the order Mucorales and found 22 cases 2).

Rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis is usually associated with a poor prognosis and is almost exclusively seen in immunocompromised patients.

59 patients were diagnosed with COVID-19 associated mucormycosis (CAM). The median duration from the first positive COVID-19 RT PCR test to the diagnosis of CAM was 17 (IQR: 12,22) days. 90% of patients were diabetic with 89% having uncontrolled sugar level (HbA1c >7%). All patients were prescribed steroids during treatment for COVID-19. 56% of patients were prescribed steroids for non-hypoxemic, mild COVID-19 (irrational steroid therapy) while in 9%, steroids were prescribed in inappropriately high dose. Patients were treated with a combination of surgical debridement (94%), intravenous liposomal Amphotericin B (91%) and concomitant oral Posaconazole (95.4%). 74.6% of patients were discharged after clinical and radiologic recovery while 25.4% died. On Relative risk analysis, COVID-19 CT severity index ≥ 18 (p=0.017), presence of orbital symptoms (p=0.002), presence of diabetic ketoacidosis (p=0.011), and cerebral involvement (p=0.0004) were associated with increased risk of death.

CAM is a rapidly progressive, angio-invasive, opportunistic fungal infection that is fatal if left untreated. The combination of surgical debridement and antifungal therapy leads to clinical and radiologic improvement in the majority of cases 3).

2015

A unique case of isolated intracranial mucormycosis of a slowly progressive nature in a healthy immunocompetent child. A 4-year-old girl with a clear medical and surgical history presented with complaints of right side facial asymmetry and unsteady gait for a period of 10 months. Clinical and radiographic investigations revealed right-sided lower motor neuron facial palsy caused by an infiltrative lesion on the right cerebellopontine angle. Initial surgical debulking was performed, a biopsy was sent for histopathological examination, and a course of prophylactic antibiotic and antifungal drugs was prescribed. The pathological report confirmed the mucormycosis fungal infection, and intravenous amphotericin B was administered for 3 weeks. One month after admission, the patient left the hospital with complete recovery. Follow-ups after 4, 8 and 12 weeks revealed no sensory or motor neurological deficits. In conclusion, this is a unique case of mucormycosis with regard to the nature and location of the infection, along with the host being a healthy child. Initial surgical exploration is a very critical step in the early diagnosis and treatment of such rare conditions 4).

2014

A 42-year-old man who developed a cerebellar mucor abscess after undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome. In the post-operative period he was admitted to the neurocritical care unit and received liposomal amphotericin B intravenously and through an external ventricular drain. This patient demonstrates that utilization of an external ventricular drain for intrathecal antifungal therapy in the post-operative period may warrant further study in patients with difficult to treat intracranial fungal abscesses 5).

2013

A case of mucormycosis presenting with extensive necrosis of the maxilla with extension into the retrobulbar and infrabulbar region in an otherwise healthy patient. He underwent extensive debriding surgery followed by amphotericin B first and then oral antifungal therapy, but unfortunately, even after extensive surgery and medical treatment, he did not survive 6).

2010

Yoon et al describe a case of Rhino-orbital-cerebral (ROC) mucormycosis with pericranial abscess occurring in a female patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. The infection initially developed in the right-sided nasal sinus and later progressed through the paranasal sinuses with the invasion of the peri-orbital and frontotemporal region, due to the delayed diagnosis and treatment. Numerous non-septate hyphae of the zygomycetes were identified by a punch biopsy from the nasal cavity and by an open biopsy of the involved dura. The patient was treated successfully with extensive debridement of her necrotic skull and surrounding tissues, drainage of her pericranial abscess and antifungal therapy, including intravenous amphotericin B for 61 days and oral posaconazole for the following 26 days. She returned to a normal life and has had no recurrence since the end of her treatment 15 months ago 7).

2000

A 59-year-old immunocompetent white man sustained a high-pressure water jet injury to the right inner canthus while cleaning an air conditioner filter. He later had “orbital cellulitis” develop that did not respond to antibiotics and progressed to orbital infarction. Imaging studies and biopsy results led to a diagnosis of mucormycosis. Tissue culture grew Apophysomyces elegans, a new genus of the family Mucoraceae first isolated in 1979. Orbital exenteration and radical debridement of involved adjacent structures, combined with intravenous liposomal amphotericin, resulted in patient survival.

After orbital exenteration and debridement of involved adjacent structures along with intravenous liposomal amphotericin, our patient has remained free from relapse with long-term follow-up.

The agent causing this case of rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis (Apophysomyces elegans) contrasts with the three genera most commonly responsible for mucormycosis (Rhizopus, Mucor, and Absidia) in that infections with this agent tend to occur in warm climates, by means of traumatic inoculation, and in immunocompetent patients. Rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis should be considered in all patients with orbital inflammation associated with multiple cranial nerve palsies and retinal or orbital infarction, regardless of their immunologic status. A team approach to management is recommended for early, appropriate surgery and systemic antifungal agents 8).


1)

Soni K, Das A, Sharma V, Goyal A, Choudhury B, Chugh A, Kumar D, Yadav T, Jain V, Agarwal A, Garg M, Bhatnagar K, Elhence P, Bhatia PK, Garg MK, Misra S. Surgical & medical management of ROCM (Rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis) epidemic in COVID-19 era and its outcomes – a tertiary care center experience. J Mycol Med. 2021 Dec 25;32(2):101238. doi: 10.1016/j.mycmed.2021.101238. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34979299.
2)

Gutiérrez-Delgado EM, Treviño-González JL, Montemayor-Alatorre A, Ceceñas-Falcón LA, Ruiz-Holguín E, Andrade-Vázquez CJ, Lara-Medrano R, Ramos-Jiménez J. Chronic rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis: A case report and review of the literature. Ann Med Surg (Lond). 2016 Feb 6;6:87-91. doi: 10.1016/j.amsu.2016.02.003. eCollection 2016 Mar. PubMed PMID: 26981237; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4776268.
3)

Dravid A, Kashiva R, Khan Z, Bande B, Memon D, Kodre A, Mane M, Pawar V, Patil D, Kalyani S, Raut P, Bapte M, Saldanha C, Chandak D, Patil T, Reddy MS, Bhayani K, Laxmi SS, Vishnu PD, Srivastava S, Khandelwal S, More S, Shakeel A, Pawar M, Nande P, Harshe A, Kadam S, Hallikar S, Kamal N, Andrabi D, Bodhale S, Raut A, Chandrashekhar S, Raman C, Mahajan U, Joshi G, Mane D. Epidemiology, clinical presentation and management of COVID-19 associated mucormycosis: A single center experience from Pune, Western India. Mycoses. 2022 Feb 25. doi: 10.1111/myc.13435. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35212032.
4)

Al Barbarawi MM, Allouh MZ. Successful Management of a Unique Condition of Isolated Intracranial Mucormycosis in an Immunocompetent Child. Pediatr Neurosurg. 2015;50(3):165-7. doi: 10.1159/000381750. Epub 2015 May 7. PubMed PMID: 25967858.
5)

Grannan BL, Yanamadala V, Venteicher AS, Walcott BP, Barr JC. Use of external ventriculostomy and intrathecal anti-fungal treatment in cerebral mucormycotic abscess. J Clin Neurosci. 2014 Oct;21(10):1819-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2014.01.008. Epub 2014 May 19. Review. PubMed PMID: 24852901.
6)

Rahman A, Akter K, Hossain S, Rashid HU. Rhino-orbital mucourmycosis in a non-immunocompromised patient. BMJ Case Rep. 2013 Feb 6;2013. pii: bcr2012007863. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2012-007863. PubMed PMID: 23391952; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3604437.
7)

Yoon YK, Kim MJ, Chung YG, Shin IY. Successful treatment of a case with rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis by the combination of neurosurgical intervention and the sequential use of amphotericin B and posaconazole. J Korean Neurosurg Soc. 2010 Jan;47(1):74-7. doi: 10.3340/jkns.2010.47.1.74. Epub 2010 Jan 31. PubMed PMID: 20157385; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2817523.
8)

Fairley C, Sullivan TJ, Bartley P, Allworth T, Lewandowski R. Survival after rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis in an immunocompetent patient. Ophthalmology. 2000 Mar;107(3):555-8. PubMed PMID: 10711895.
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