Ossified chronic subdural hematoma

Ossified chronic subdural hematoma

Calcified chronic subdural hematoma or ossified chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), characterized by slowly progressing neurological symptoms, is a rarely seen entity that may remain asymptomatic for many years.

Incidence of calcified or ossified CSDH is high in certain countries, including the USAJapan and Turkey, with a steady increase in recent years 1).

They should be considered in the differential diagnosis at the time when we encounter because of its infrequency and variable clinical manifestation, following shunting in children or head trauma in adults 2).

Differential diagnosis

Calcified epidural hematoma, calcified empyema, meningioma, calcified arachnoid cyst, and calcified convexity of the dura mater with acute epidural hematoma should be considered for the differential diagnosis 3).

Treatment

Management of CSDH has improved dramatically in recent years thanks to advances in diagnostic tools, but there is still some controversy regarding the optimal treatment strategy.

Systematic reviews

In a systematic review, PRISMA guidelines were followed to query existing online databases between January 1930 and December 2018. We found a total of 88 articles containing 114 cases of calcified or ossified CSDH, 83 patients operated and 31 ones not operated.

There were 78 males and 29 females (7 with unreported gender) from 25 countries, ages ranging from 4 months to 86 years (mean 33.7 years), with etiologies of head trauma in 33.3%, shunting for hydrocephalus in 27.2%, or following cranial surgery in 4.4%. The duration of symptoms ranged from acute onset to 20 years, with a mean of 24.1 months. Imaging techniques such as X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were used with pathological confirmation of CSDH and complete recovery in 56.4% of patients.

Incidence of calcified or ossified CSDH is high in certain countries, including the USAJapan and Turkey, with a steady increase in recent years. Therapy of choice is surgery in these patients and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis at the time when we encounter because of its infrequency and variable clinical manifestation, following shunting in children or head trauma in adults 4).


Yang X, Qian Z, Qiu Y, Li X. Diagnosis and Management of Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma. J Craniofac Surg. 2015 Sep;26(6):e550-1. doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000002025. PubMed PMID: 26352368.

Case reports

A 59-year-old man presented with epileptic seizures interpreted as episodic syncope in the past 3 years and the patient had a history of head trauma about 4 years ago. Computed tomography revealed an ossified chronic subdural hematoma involving the right frontotemporoparietal region, which was totally resected using microsurgical technique. Postoperatively, weakness developed in the right arm and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a bilateral tension pneumocephalus, which was immediately treated by a left frontal burr hole trepanation, and the patient was discharged uneventfully 5).


A 46-year-old man with a history of alcohol abuse and a right frontotemporoparietal and left frontal ossified CSH that was diagnosed 2 years previously presented with headache and memory loss over 6 days. The patient was being followed with serial imaging, which showed the static state of the mass and no other lesions 7 months before admission. He underwent right frontotemporoparietal craniectomy to remove the ossified CSH and tumor. When the bone was lifted and the thin dura was opened, a hard, thick, ossified capsule was observed. No apparent tumor invasion was noted in the skull or epidural space. Despite refusing further chemotherapy and radiation therapy, the patient has been disease-free and working for 5 years.

Based on reported cases and relevant literature, large B-cell lymphoma may be associated with ossified CSH 6).


A 81-year-old woman with calcified chronic subdural hematoma. The patient underwent an osteoplastic left craniotomy, evacuation of chronic subdural mass with careful dissection and successful removal of the inner and outer membrane. Postoperative CT scan showed removal of subdural hematoma, a decrease of the left shift of median line and good brain re-expansion. The postoperative period was without any serious complications.

The subdural hematoma was successfully removed, resulting in a good recovery with complete resolution of patient’s symptoms. They highly recommend surgical treatment in cases of chronic symptomatic calcified subdural hematomas 7).


A Giant Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma 8).


Fang et al. reported a case of ossified chronic subdural hematoma in a 7-year-old female child, with a literature review 9).


Siddiqui et al. reported one case with diabetes insipidus 10).


A young girl affected by a syndromal hydrocephalus who developed a bilateral ossified chronic subdural hematoma with the typical radiological appearance of “the armored brain”. Bilateral calcified chronic subdural hematoma is a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. There is controversy in the treatment, but most published literature discourages a surgical intervention to remove the calcifications 11).


Turgut et al. published one Ossified chronic subdural hematoma 12).


A 22-year-old male who had presented with severe headache consequent to brain compression caused by bifronto-parieto-temporal ossified subdural hematoma. We evaluated our method and surgical intervention in the light of the literature. The question whether the ossified membrane should be excised or not excised in these cases is a matter of controversy. They think that an ossified membrane causing an armored brain appearance should be excised in symptomatic, young patients with prominent cerebral compression. During this dissection, the relatively thickened arachnoid mater provides a safe border 13).


A 67-year-old man presented with headache, dysphasia, and left-sided hemiparesis. Routine skull x-ray showed a huge calcification extending from the frontal to the parietal regions in the right side. CT and MRI scan revealed a huge ossified SDH covering the right hemisphere. Right frontoparietal craniotomy was performed and the ossified SDH was completely removed. Severe adhesion was noticed between the pia mater and the inner surface of the ossified mass. The subdural mass had ossified hard outer and inner rims and a soft central part. The postoperative course was uneventful and 3 months after the operation, the patient was neurologically intact. The authors report the successful treatment of a patient with a huge ossified SDH covering the right hemisphere. Careful dissection and total removal are needed in such symptomatic cases to avoid cortical injury and to improve results 14).


A 24-year-old man with a history of tonic-clonic convulsions since 7 months of age was admitted because of increasing frequency and duration of seizures. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a fusiform extra-axial lesion just above the tentorium and adjacent to the cerebral falx. A calcified and ossified chronic subdural hematoma was noted and was almost completely removed by craniotomy. Better seizure control was achieved by the removal of the calcified chronic subdural hematoma. Calcified subdural hematoma, calcified epidural hematoma, calcified empyema, meningioma, calcified arachnoid cyst, and calcified convexity of the dura mater with acute epidural hematoma should be considered for the differential diagnosis of an extra-axial calcified lesion 15).


Turgut et al. reported the successful removal of an ossified crust-like chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) covering the hemisphere in a 16-year-old boy. In this article, the importance of the surgical approach is stressed, and the rarity of this condition in the neurosurgical literature is also outlined 16).


A case of ossified chronic subdural hematoma is presented in a 13-year-old male in whom the mass was surgically removed. His neurological deficits continued afterward but were less severe 17).

References

1) , 2) , 4)

Turgut M, Akhaddar A, Turgut AT. Calcified or Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Systematic Review of 114 Cases Reported during Last Century with a Demonstrative Case Report. World Neurosurg. 2019 Nov 1. pii: S1878-8750(19)32791-3. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.10.153. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PubMed PMID: 31682989.
3) , 15)

Yan HJ, Lin KE, Lee ST, Tzaan WC. Calcified chronic subdural hematoma: case report. Changgeng Yi Xue Za Zhi. 1998 Dec;21(4):521-5. PubMed PMID: 10074745.
5)

Turgut M, Yay MÖ. A Rare Case of Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma Complicated with Tension Pneumocephalus. J Neurol Surg Rep. 2019 Oct;80(4):e44-e45. doi: 10.1055/s-0039-1694738. Epub 2019 Dec 31. PubMed PMID: 31908905; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6938459.
6)

Liu X, Zhou J, Shen B, Sun D, Zhang Z, Li H, Zhang J. Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma and Subsequent Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Case Report and Literature Review. World Neurosurg. 2019 Oct;130:165-169. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.07.011. Epub 2019 Jul 9. PubMed PMID: 31299306.
7)

Snopko P, Kolarovszki B, Opsenak R, Hanko M, Benco M. Chronic calcified subdural hematoma – case report of a rare diagnosis. Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub. 2019 Sep 26. doi: 10.5507/bp.2019.041. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31558846.
8)

Tian W, Meng X, Zou J. A Giant Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2019 Sep;29(9):905. doi: 10.29271/jcpsp.2019.09.905. PubMed PMID: 31455496.
9)

Fang J, Liu Y, Jiang X. Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Children: Case Report and Review of Literature. World Neurosurg. 2019 Jun;126:613-615. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.03.144. Epub 2019 Mar 27. PubMed PMID: 30926556.
10)

Siddiqui SA, Singh PK, Sawarkar D, Singh M, Sharma BS. Bilateral Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting as Diabetes Insipidus-Case Report and Literature Review. World Neurosurg. 2017 Feb;98:520-524. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2016.11.031. Epub 2016 Nov 17. Review. PubMed PMID: 27867130.
11)

Viozzi I, van Baarsen K, Grotenhuis A. Armored brain in a young girl with a syndromal hydrocephalus. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2017 Jan;159(1):81-83. doi: 10.1007/s00701-016-2991-1. Epub 2016 Oct 25. PubMed PMID: 27778104; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5177664.
12)

Turgut M, Samancoğlu H, Ozsunar Y, Erkuş M. Ossified chronic subdural hematoma. Cent Eur Neurosurg. 2010 Aug;71(3):146-8. doi: 10.1055/s-0030-1253346. Epub 2010 May 3. PubMed PMID: 20440672.
13)

Kaplan M, Akgün B, Seçer HI. Ossified chronic subdural hematoma with armored brain. Turk Neurosurg. 2008 Oct;18(4):420-4. PubMed PMID: 19107693.
14)

Moon HG, Shin HS, Kim TH, Hwang YS, Park SK. Ossified chronic subdural hematoma. Yonsei Med J. 2003 Oct 30;44(5):915-8. PubMed PMID: 14584111.
16)

Turgut M, Palaoğlu S, Sağlam S. Huge ossified crust-like subdural hematoma covering the hemisphere and causing acute signs of increased intracranial pressure. Childs Nerv Syst. 1997 Jul;13(7):415-7. PubMed PMID: 9298279.
17)

Iplikçioğlu AC, Akkaş O, Sungur R. Ossified chronic subdural hematoma: case report. J Trauma. 1991 Feb;31(2):272-5. PubMed PMID: 1994092.

Third ventricular tumor treatment

Third ventricular tumor treatment

A plethora of surgical strategies have been described to reach deep-seated lesions situated within the third ventricle including the Rosenfeld, or transcallosal anterior interfoniceal approach.

Third ventricle tumors are surgical challenges because of the complex surrounding structures, including the hypothalamus, infundibulum, optic pathways, limbic system, and nearby vasculature 1).

These tumors cause obstructive hydrocephalus and thus necessitate a CSF diversion procedure such as an endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV), often coupled with an endoscopic biopsy (EBX). Lesions located posterior to the massa intermedia pose a technical challenge, as the use of a rigid endoscope for performing both an ETV and EBX is limited.

Roth and Constantini, recommend using a combined rigid-flexible endoscope for endoscopic third ventriculostomy and biopsy to approach posterior third ventricular tumors (behind the massa intermedia). This technique overcomes the limitations of using a rigid endoscope by reaching 2 distant regions 2).

The first choice treatment option for third ventricle lesions with dilated ventricles was endoscopic management 3). Among microsurgical approaches, the expanded transcallosal transforaminal approach was a more recently practiced and safe method of accessing the anterior and middle third ventricle. With this approach, the risk of damage to most of the vital structures, such as the fornix or the thalamus was avoided 4). The location of the junction of the anterior septal and internal cerebral vein is essential. Preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) venography can identify the junction. Some areas remain inaccessible, such as the anterosuperior and posterosuperior regions of the third ventricle 5).

The expanded transcallosal transforaminal approach remains a safe and relatively secure method of gaining access to the third ventricle 6).


There are three broad categories – anterior, lateral, and posterior routes. The anterior routes include transforaminal, interforniceal, transchoroidal, and subchoroidal. The subtemporal route is the main lateral corridor to the third ventricle and recommended if the tumor is located lateral to the sella turcica or extends into the middle cranial fossa 7). A transtubular access to the third ventricle is also practical. It enables blunt dissection of the corpus callosum which may minimize retraction injuries. Three-dimensional endoscopic visualization, coupled with a transparent plastic retractor, provides absolute and undeviating monitoring of the surgical corridor 8). In the third ventricle’s anterior portion, the endoscopic endonasal approach permits surgical maneuverability. The lamina terminalis and tuber cinereum are thought to be safe entry points for this approach 9). Tumors leading to the blockage of the Sylvian aqueduct can cause obstructive hydrocephalus; this calls for a CSF diversion procedure, endoscopic third ventriculostomy, combined with an endoscopic biopsy. Posterior third ventricular tumors should be approached using a combination of a rigid-flexible endoscope 10).


Colloid cyst treatment.

Choroid plexus papilloma treatment.

Craniopharyngioma treatment.


Operative approaches to tumors of the third ventricle, mainly the bifrontal approach through the lamina terminalis, has several advantages. First, the main arteries can be exposed and the operative field is sufficiently wide to render the operative procedure safe. Second, cortical incision or excision is unnecessary. By cutting the lamina terminalis, which is usually thin and expanded as a result of hydrocephalus, even a large tumor can be removed. In addition, lethal complications are avoided, because this approach has less possibility of damage to the lateral wall of the third ventricle. Seventeen cases of tumor in the third ventricle underwent operation via this approach. The operative technique for the bifrontal approach through the lamina terminalis and three representative cases are reported. This approach can be applied not only to tumors, but to arteriovenous malformations or giant aneurysms adjacent to the third ventricle 11).

References

1)

Tomasello F, Cardali S, Angileri FF, Conti A. Transcallosal approach to third ventricle tumors: How I do it. Acta Neurochir. 2013;155:1031–4.
2) , 10)

Roth J, Constantini S. Combined rigid and flexible endoscopy for tumors in the posterior third ventricle. J Neurosurg. 2015 Jun;122(6):1341-6. doi: 10.3171/2014.9.JNS141397. Epub 2015 Mar 27. PubMed PMID: 25816082.
3)

Chibbaro S, Di Rocco F, Makiese O, Reiss A, Poczos P, Mirone G, Servadei F, George B, Crafa P, Polivka M, Romano A. Neuroendoscopic management of posterior third ventricle and pineal region tumors: technique, limitation, and possible complication avoidance. Neurosurg Rev. 2012 Jul;35(3):331-38; discussion 338-40. doi: 10.1007/s10143-011-0370-1. Epub 2012 Jan 19. PubMed PMID: 22258494.
4) , 6)

Patel P, Cohen-Gadol AA, Boop F, Klimo P Jr. Technical strategies for the transcallosal transforaminal approach to third ventricle tumors: expanding the operative corridor. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2014 Oct;14(4):365-71. doi: 10.3171/2014.6.PEDS1452. Epub 2014 Aug 8. PubMed PMID: 25105512.
5)

Ahmed SI, Javed G, Laghari AA, Bareeqa SB, Aziz K, Khan M, Samar SS, Humera RA, Khan AR, Farooqui MO, Shahbaz A. Third Ventricular Tumors: A Comprehensive Literature Review. Cureus. 2018 Oct 5;10(10):e3417. doi: 10.7759/cureus.3417. Review. PubMed PMID: 30542631; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6284874.
7)

Cikla U, Swanson KI, Tumturk A, Keser N, Uluc K, Cohen-Gadol A, Baskaya MK. Microsurgical resection of tumors of the lateral and third ventricles: operative corridors for difficult-to-reach lesions. J Neurooncol. 2016 Nov;130(2):331-340. Epub 2016 May 27. Review. PubMed PMID: 27235145; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5090015.
8)

Shoakazemi A, Evins AI, Burrell JC, Stieg PE, Bernardo A. A 3D endoscopic transtubular transcallosal approach to the third ventricle. J Neurosurg. 2015 Mar;122(3):564-73. doi: 10.3171/2014.11.JNS14341. Epub 2015 Jan 2. PubMed PMID: 25555026.
9)

Cavallo LM, Di Somma A, de Notaris M, Prats-Galino A, Aydin S, Catapano G, Solari D, de Divitiis O, Somma T, Cappabianca P. Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to the Third Ventricle: Multimodal Anatomical Study with Surgical Implications. World Neurosurg. 2015 Aug;84(2):267-78. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2015.03.007. Epub 2015 Mar 28. PubMed PMID: 25827043.
11)

Suzuki J, Katakura R, Mori T. Interhemispheric approach through the lamina terminalis to tumors of the anterior part of the third ventricle. Surg Neurol. 1984 Aug;22(2):157-63. PubMed PMID: 6740479.

Setting sun sign

Setting sun sign

The setting sun sign (also known as the sunset eye sign or setting sun phenomenon) is a clinical phenomenon encountered in infants and young children with raised intracranial pressure.

It is an earlier sign of hydrocephalus than enlarged head circumference, full fontanelle, separation of sutures, irritability vomiting. Consequently, this sign is a valuable early warning of an entity requiring prompt neuroimaging and urgent surgical intervention 1).

Part of Parinaud’s syndrome.

Epidemiology

Seen in up to 40% of children with obstructive hydrocephalus and 13% of children with shunt dysfunction 2).

In 126 children with internal hydrocephalus setting sun was descibed in 51, syndrome of the aqueduct of Sylvius 14, paresis of craniocerebral nerves 9, nystagmus 8, optic atrophy 4 3).

Clinical features

It consists of an up-gaze paresis with the eyes appearing driven downward. The lower portion of the pupil may be covered by the lower eyelid, and sclera may be seen between the upper eyelid and the iris.

Pathogenesis

Chattha et al. suggest periaqueductal dysfunction rather than the mechanical displacement as the possible mechanism for this sign 4).

Outcome

In hydrocephalus, the convulsion and so-called setting sun sign had no significant correlation to poor prognosis 5).

Despite the fact that setting sun eye is a grave sign, most commonly accompanied by other neurological signs and symptoms suggesting serious diseases, it might be observed as a sole finding in a totally normal infant with inconclusive brain imaging and laboratory tests 6).

Case series

A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Tehran from June 2001 to 2006. The study included 15 healthy infants who were referred to the neurosurgery clinic for setting sun eye. All were evaluated with brain imaging, and laboratory tests including at least thyroid function tests, and serum calcium and phosphorus. The cases were followed by regular outpatient visits until the age of 2 years.

They were 3-8 months old at the time of referring to the outpatient clinic. Setting sun eye was observed by the mother in all cases and confirmed during their visit to the clinic. All had normal brain imaging and normal laboratory tests (thyroid function and electrolytes). Setting sun eye disappeared gradually during the follow-up period with a range of 2-8 months after detection by the mother.

Despite the fact that setting sun eye is a grave sign, most commonly accompanied by other neurological signs and symptoms suggesting serious diseases, it might be observed as a sole finding in a totally normal infant with inconclusive brain imaging and laboratory tests. We found that this type of setting sun eye has a benign course and will disappear without any intervention several months after its detection (commonly before the age of 2 years without any intervention) 7).


19 infants who displayed the setting-sun eye phenomenon were observed during the first year of life. Nine of the infants showed no signs of illness, eight had an evident increase in intracranial pressure requiring surgical relief, and two had transient signs of increased intracranial pressure which resolved spontaneously. The setting-sun phenomenon could be elicited both by alteration of the infant’s position and by removal of light, and it also occurred spontaneously. The effectiveness of the eliciting mechanism depended on the age of the infant. The component parts of the phenomenon consist of downward rotation of the eyeballs and retraction of the upper eyelids, sometimes accompanied by raising of the brow. The phenomenon can be observed in healthy infants, and its value in early recognition of increased intracranial pressure is limited. The response might indicate increased intracranial pressure if it can be elicited by alteration of position in infants older than four weeks of age or if there is a marked response to removal of light in infants younger than eight weeks or older than 20 weeks of age, especially if the response is combined with constant or intermittent strabismus or undulating eye-movements 8).


Eight cases of obstructive hydrocephalus manifesting palsy of upward gaze and other features of the Sylvian aqueduct syndrome are reported. During the crisis of intracranial hypertension, all of them developed upward gaze palsy and variable abnormalities of the convergence mechanism such as paralysis, spasm, and convergence nystagmus. The frequent apparent blindness was probably related to gaze paralysis since visual evoked responses were present. All these ocular abnormalities disappeared after shunting. Periaqueductal dysfunction on the basis of raised intracranial pressure is postulated as the possible mechanism for the above ocular manifestations. The ‘setting sun’ sign is frequently seen in infants and children with hydrocephalus and has been considered in the past to result from the displacement of eyeballs by pressure from the orbital roof plate. Our observations would suggest periaqueductal dysfunction rather than the mechanical displacement as the possible mechanism for this sign 9).

Case reports

Yoshikawa reported two normally developed infants showing benign“ setting sun” phenomenon. A 2(2-12)-year-old boy and a 7-year-old boy, who were born without any complications at full term, developed brief episodes of downward gazing during sucking and crying after birth However, there were no other clinical or laboratory findings, and they developed normally. The phenomenon was not visible until 6 months and 7 months, respectively. The “setting sun” phenomenon usually indicates underlying severe brain damage and can also be seen, although rarely, in healthy full-term infants until 1 to 5 months. However, the benign “setting sun” phenomenon might exist until 6 or 7 months of age in normal infants 10).

References

1) , 2)

Boragina M, Cohen E. An infant with the “setting-sun” eye phenomenon. CMAJ. 2006 Oct 10;175(8):878. PubMed PMID: 17030938; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1586074.
3)

Tzekov C, Cherninkova S, Gudeva T. Neuroophthalmological symptoms in children treated for internal hydrocephalus. Pediatr Neurosurg. 1991-1992;17(6):317-20. PubMed PMID: 1840820.
4) , 9)

Chattha AS, Delong GR. Sylvian aqueduct syndrome as a sign of acute obstructive hydrocephalus in children. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1975 Mar;38(3):288-96. PubMed PMID: 1151409; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC491910.
5)

Ito H, Onodera Y, Takanashi K, Tajima K, Miwa T. [Some observations on prognosis in congenital hydrocephalus (first report)–with reference to the preoperative evaluation of the hydrocephalic infants (author’s transl)]. No Shinkei Geka. 1975 Mar;3(3):245-54. Japanese. PubMed PMID: 1238932.
6) , 7)

Nejat F, Yazdani S, El Khashab M. Setting sun eye in normal healthy infants. Pediatr Neurosurg. 2008;44(3):190-2. doi: 10.1159/000120148. Epub 2008 Mar 11. PubMed PMID: 18334841.
8)

Cernerud L. The setting-sun eye phenomenon in infancy. Dev Med Child Neurol. 1975 Aug;17(4):447-55. PubMed PMID: 1158051.
10)

Yoshikawa H. Benign “setting sun” phenomenon in full-term infants. J Child Neurol. 2003 Jun;18(6):424-5. PubMed PMID: 12886979.
WhatsApp WhatsApp us
%d bloggers like this: