Non small cell lung cancer intracranial metastases radiosurgery

Non small cell lung cancer intracranial metastases radiosurgery

Multisession radiosurgery (M-GKS) may be an effective alternative for large brain metastases from Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Specifically, severe radiation induced toxicity (≥ grade 3) did not occur in M-GKS for large-volume metastases. Although the long-term effects and results from larger samples remain unclear, M-GKS may be a suitable palliative treatment for preserving neurological function 1).

Traditionally, whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) has been the cornerstone of Non small cell lung cancer intracranial metastases treatment, but its indication is a matter of debate. A randomized trial has shown that for patients with a poor prognosis, WBRT does not add quality of life (QoL) nor survival over the best supportive care. In recent decades, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has become an attractive non-invasive treatment for patients with BM. Only the BM is irradiated to an ablative dose, sparing healthy brain tissue. Intracranial recurrence rates decrease when WBRT is administered following SRS or resection but does not improve overall survival and comes at the expense of neurocognitive function and QoL. The downside of SRS compared with WBRT is a risk of radionecrosis (RN) and a higher risk of developing new BM during follow-up. Currently, SRS is an established treatment for patients with a maximum of four BM. Several promising strategies are currently being investigated to further improve the indication and outcome of SRS for patients with BM: the effectivity and safety of SRS in patients with more than four BM, combining SRS with systemic therapy such as targeted agents or immunotherapy, shared decision-making with SRS as a treatment option, and individualized isotoxic dose prescription to mitigate the risk of RN and further enhance local control probability of SRS.

The review of Hartgerink et al., discusses the current indications of SRS and future directions of treatment for patients with BM of NSCLC with focus on the value of SRS 2).


Radiosurgery for multiple BMs is controversial, yet patients with EGFR Non small cell lung cancer intracranial metastases and Anaplastic lymphoma kinase non small cell lung cancer may be uniquely suited to benefit from this approach. These results support single and multiple courses of radiosurgery without WBRT for patients with oncogene-addicted NSCLC with four or more BMs 3).

References

1)

Park K, Kim JW, Chung HT, Paek SH, Kim DG. Single-Session versus Multisession Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Large Brain Metastases from Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Retrospective Analysis. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. 2019 May 22:1-7. doi: 10.1159/000496154. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31117101.
2)

Hartgerink D, van der Heijden B, De Ruysscher D, Postma A, Ackermans L, Hoeben A, Anten M, Lambin P, Terhaag K, Jochems A, Dekker A, Schoenmaekers J, Hendriks L, Zindler J. Stereotactic Radiosurgery in the Management of Patients With Brain Metastases of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Indications, Decision Tools and Future Directions. Front Oncol. 2018 May 9;8:154. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2018.00154. eCollection 2018. Review. PubMed PMID: 29868476; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5954030.
3)

Robin TP, Camidge DR, Stuhr K, Nath SK, Breeze RE, Pacheco JM, Liu AK, Gaspar LE, Purcell WT, Doebele RC, Kavanagh BD, Rusthoven CG. Excellent Outcomes with Radiosurgery for Multiple Brain Metastases in ALK and EGFR Driven Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. J Thorac Oncol. 2018 May;13(5):715-720. doi: 10.1016/j.jtho.2017.12.006. Epub 2017 Dec 19. PubMed PMID: 29269007.

Susceptibility weighted imaging for glioma

Susceptibility weighted imaging for glioma

Gradient echo T2WI MRI is the 3–4 × more sensitive test than FLAIR for demonstrating intraparenchymablood (which appears dark) due to high sensitivity to paramagnetic artifact. It is not as sensitive as SWI.

Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) of brain tumors provides information about neoplastic vasculature and intratumoral micro- and macrobleedings. Low- and high-grade gliomas can be distinguished by SWI due to their different vascular characteristics. Fractal analysis allows for quantification of these radiological differences by a computer-based morphological assessment of SWI patterns.

SWI and CE-SWI are indispensable tools for diagnosis, preoperative grading, posttherapy surveillance, and assessment of glioma 1).

The theory that susceptibility signals show microvasculature that correlates with tumor grade has been well validated with the help of various studies. However, the cons of SWI lie within the technique itself. Small tweaks made in imaging parameters lead to varying subjective results. This lack of standardization of the SWI technique remains an obstacle in its integration into mainstream grading of gliomas. SWI for now plays an important role in detecting gliomas and guiding biopsies. The goal of noninvasive accurate grading of tumors is yet to be realized. Further studies with greater sample size and better collaborations are warranted in this regard 2).


Eighteen GBM patients were retrospectively analyzed. After completion of therapy, imaging was performed every 3 months. MRI was analyzed at the following time points: after the third and sixth cycle of adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy, thereafter in 3 month intervals and at recurrence. The number of SWI positive tumor pixels was quantified and compared with progression as defined by the RANO criteria on T2- and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI sequences (T1-CE).

The MRI interval between completion of the sixth chemotherapy cycle and last MRI before progression was 390 ± 292 days. Between the last MRI before progression and at progression a significant increase in SWI positive tumor pixels was observed (P = .012), whereas tumor size remained unchanged (RANO T2: P = .385; RANO T1-CE: P = .165). The number of SWI positive pixels remained unchanged between last MRI before progression until progression (P = .149), whereas RANO T2 and T1-CE showed tumor progression (interval 128 ± 69 days).

SWI positive pixel count increases significantly prior to changes in tumor size (RANO). The findings may be explained by microbleeds compatible with stimulation of angiogenesis and possibly serve as an early biomarker of tumor progression 3).


Seventy-eight patients affected by brain tumors of different histopathology (low- and high-grade gliomas, metastases, meningiomas, lymphomas) were included. All patients underwent preoperative 3-T magnetic resonance imaging including SWI, on which the lesions were contoured. The images underwent automated computation, extracting 2 quantitative parameters: the volume fraction of SWI signals within the tumors (signal ratio) and the morphological self-similar features (fractal dimension [FD]). The results were then correlated with each histopathological type of tumor.

Signal ratio and FD were able to differentiate low-grade gliomas from grade III and IV gliomas, metastases, and meningiomas (P < .05). FD was statistically different between lymphomas and high-grade gliomas (P < .05). A receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed that the optimal cutoff value for differentiating low- from high-grade gliomas was 1.75 for FD (sensitivity, 81%; specificity, 89%) and 0.03 for signal ratio (sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 86%).

FD of SWI on 3-T magnetic resonance imaging is a novel image biomarker for glioma grading and brain tumor characterization. Computational models offer promising results that may improve diagnosis and open perspectives in the radiological assessment of brain tumors 4).

References

1)

Hsu CC, Watkins TW, Kwan GN, Haacke EM. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging of Glioma: Update on Current Imaging Status and Future Directions. J Neuroimaging. 2016 Jul;26(4):383-90. doi: 10.1111/jon.12360. Epub 2016 May 26. Review. PubMed PMID: 27227542.
2)

Mohammed W, Xunning H, Haibin S, Jingzhi M. Clinical applications of susceptibility-weighted imaging in detecting and grading intracranial gliomas: a review. Cancer Imaging. 2013 Apr 24;13:186-95. doi: 10.1102/1470-7330.2013.0020. Review. PubMed PMID: 23618919; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3636597.
3)

van Leyen K, Roelcke U, Gruber P, Remonda L, Berberat J. Susceptibility and Tumor Size Changes During the Time Course of Standard Treatment in Recurrent Glioblastoma. J Neuroimaging. 2019 May 21. doi: 10.1111/jon.12631. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31112344.
4)

Di Ieva A, Le Reste PJ, Carsin-Nicol B, Ferre JC, Cusimano MD. Diagnostic Value of Fractal Analysis for the Differentiation of Brain Tumors Using 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging. Neurosurgery. 2016 Dec;79(6):839-846. PubMed PMID: 27332779.

Supratentorial Epidural Hematoma after Posterior Fossa Surgery

Supratentorial Epidural Hematoma after Posterior Fossa Surgery

Non-traumatic, non-arterial origin delayed Epidural Hematoma after posterior fossa surgery is extremely rare. Moreover, the pathogenesis of its supratentorial extension is obscure.

The possible causes include sudden decompression of ventricular pressure in the supratentorial compartment, rupture of cortical veins in the sitting positioncoagulopathy, hemodynamic fluctuations during surgery, and position-related ischemia 1).

The lowering of the ventricular pressure by the ventricular tapduring the operation may play significant role in the formation of the extradural hematoma.

The younger age of the cases and the long history of increased intracranial pressure were stressed in the literature2).

Wolfsberger et al., stressed the importance of early postoperative CT scan and optimal management of ventricular pressure and coagulation status to detect and prevent this possibly life-threatening complication 3).

Avci et al., from Mersin, reported a case during removal of a huge Posterior fossa dermoid cyst 4).

Pandey et al., from Bangalore reported in 2008 a large bifrontal extradural hematoma following posterior fossa surgery for a vermian medulloblastoma5).

Tsugane et al., reported five cases of the supratentorial extradural hematomas secondary to the posterior fossa craniectomy.

The site of the hematoma was far from the operative field and two cases showed acute course and three were rather mild. The symptoms of this complication were the unsuspected sensorium disturbance, anisocoria and the non-functioning ventricular drainage. Two cases died of this complication and two were severely disabled 6).

Multiple Supratentorial Epidural Hematomas

Tyagi et al., from Bangalore published Multiple Remote Sequential Supratentorial Epidural Hematoma7).

Wolfsberger et al., from Vienna published a 31-year-old female who presented with a history of chronic hydrocephalus due to fourth-ventricular plexus papilloma. Following resection of the posterior fossa tumor with intraoperative placement of a ventricular drainage, she consecutively developed four supratentorial epidural haematomas at different locations, all necessitating evacuation. The clinical manifestations ranged from subtle neurological deficits to signs of tentorial herniation; the ultimate outcome was complete recovery. Rapid tapering of CSF pressure after long-standing hydrocephalus and clotting disorders could be implicated as causative factors. They stressed the importance of early postoperative CT scan and optimal management of ventricular pressure and coagulation status to detect and prevent this possibly life-threatening complication 8).

References

1) , 5)

Pandey P, Madhugiri VS, Sattur MG, Devi B I. Remote supratentorial extradural hematoma following posterior fossa surgery. Childs Nerv Syst. 2008 Jul;24(7):851-4. doi: 10.1007/s00381-007-0573-5. Epub 2008 Jan 31. PubMed PMID: 18236051.
2) , 6)

Tsugane R, Sugita K, Sato O. [Supratentorial extradural hematomas following posterior fossa craniectomy (author’s transl)]. No Shinkei Geka. 1976 Apr;4(4):401-3. Japanese. PubMed PMID: 944882.
3) , 8)

Wolfsberger S, Gruber A, Czech T. Multiple supratentorial epidural haematomas after posterior fossa surgery. Neurosurg Rev. 2004 Apr;27(2):128-32. Epub 2003 Dec 2. PubMed PMID: 14652780.
4)

Avci E, Dagtekin A, Baysal Z, Karabag H. Intraoperative supratentorial epidural haematoma during removal of a huge posterior fossa dermoid cyst. Neurol Neurochir Pol. 2010 Nov-Dec;44(6):609-13. PubMed PMID: 21225525.
7)

Tyagi G, Bhat DI, Indira Devi B, Shukla D. “Multiple Remote Sequential Supratentorial Epidural Hematomas – An Unusual and Rare Complication Following Posterior Fossa Surgery”. World Neurosurg. 2019 May 6. pii: S1878-8750(19)31225-2. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.04.228. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31071445.
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