Charlson comorbidity index

Charlson comorbidity index (CCI)

http://touchcalc.com/calculators/cci_js

https://www.mdcalc.com/charlson-comorbidity-index-cci


Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) provides a simple way of predicting recurrence in patients with chronic subdural hematoma and should be incorporated into decision-making processes, when counseling patients 1).


Data show that elderly with a good performance status and few co-morbidity may be treated as younger patients; moreover, age confirms a negative impact on survival while (CCI) ≤ 2 did not correlated with overall survival (OS) 2).

Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), functional status computed by the Karnofsky performance scale (KPS)), tumor characteristics (size, location, isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation, and O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation status), and treatment parameters (volumetrically quantified extent of resection and adjuvant therapy), evidence that aside established prognostic parameters (age and KPS) for glioblastoma patient outcome, the CCI additionally significantly impacts outcome and may be employed for preoperative patient stratification 3).

Maximal resection and radiochemotherapy treatment completion are associated with longer OS, and age alone should not preclude elderly patients from receiving surgery and adjuvant treatment. However, only a few patients were able to finish the proposed treatments. Poor performance and high comorbidity index status might compromise the benefit of treatment aggressiveness and must be considered in therapeutic decision 4).

References

1)

Martinez-Perez R, Tsimpas A, Rayo N, Cepeda S, Lagares A. Role of the patient comorbidity in the recurrence of chronic subdural hematomas. Neurosurg Rev. 2020 Mar 7. doi: 10.1007/s10143-020-01274-7. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 32146611.
2)

Balducci M, Fiorentino A, De Bonis P, Chiesa S, Manfrida S, D’Agostino GR, Mantini G, Frascino V, Mattiucci GC, De Bari B, Mangiola A, Miccichè F, Gambacorta MA, Colicchio G, Morganti AG, Anile C, Valentini V. Impact of age and co-morbidities in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma: a pooled data analysis of three prospective mono-institutional phase II studies. Med Oncol. 2012 Dec;29(5):3478-83. doi: 10.1007/s12032-012-0263-3. Epub 2012 Jun 7. PubMed PMID: 22674154.
3)

Ening G, Osterheld F, Capper D, Schmieder K, Brenke C. Charlson comorbidity index: an additional prognostic parameter for preoperative glioblastoma patient stratification. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2015 Jan 11. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25577223.
4)

Pereira AF, Carvalho BF, Vaz RM, Linhares PJ. Glioblastoma in the elderly: Therapeutic dilemmas. Surg Neurol Int. 2015 Nov 16;6(Suppl 23):S573-S582. eCollection 2015. PubMed PMID: 26664927.

Sport Concussion Assessment Tool

Sport Concussion Assessment Tool

A review summarizes the current state-of-the-art concussion evaluation instruments, ranging from the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) and tools that may enhance concussion detection, to near-term blood-based biomarkers and emerging technology (eg, head impact sensors, vestibular-ocular/eye-tracking, and mobile applications). Special focus is directed at feasibility, utility, generalizability, and challenges to implementation of each measure on-field and on the sidelines. A review of Yue et al. finds that few instruments beyond the SCAT provide guidance for removal from play, and establishing thresholds for concussion detection and removal from play in qualification/validation of future instruments is of high importance. The integration of emerging sideline concussion evaluation tools should be supported by resources and education to athletes, caregivers, athletic staff, and medical professionals for standardized administration as well as triage, referral, and prevention strategies. It should be noted that concussion evaluation instruments are used to assist the clinician in sideline diagnosis, and no single test can diagnose concussion as a standalone investigation 1).


In sport, concussion is assessed using the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) and managed with return to play guidelines.

http://www.sportphysio.ca/wp-content/uploads/SCAT-5.pdf

see Postconcussion syndrome after mild traumatic brain injury

Over the last 2 decades, sports related concussion (SRC) has garnered significant attention. Even with increased awareness and athlete education, sideline recognition and real-time diagnosis remain crucial. The need for an objective and standardized assessment of concussion led to the eventual development of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) during the Second International Conference on Concussion in Sport in 2004.


The purpose of a study of was to use the second edition of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT2) to profile a cohort of 60 healthy community volunteers who had not sustained a head injury. Participating volunteers underwent MRI scanning and were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Participants reported a median of 3 concussion-like symptoms and the 97.5 percentile score was found at 10.5 symptoms, out of a total of 22. The median severity score was 4.9 points, and 28.9 was the upper limit of the reference interval. Only 10 participants (16.7%) did not endorse any symptom. The most frequently endorsed symptom was feeling difficulty in concentrating, with 41.7% of the sample reporting it. Age, sex and general distress, anxiety and depressive symptoms were not associated with concussion-like symptoms.

This data yielded elevated cut-offs scores for both the number of symptoms and the symptom severity. In conclusion, postconcussive-like symptoms are frequent in the general non-concussed adult population and it should be taken into account in any future models developed for screening patients at risk of developing physical, cognitive, and psychological complaints following mild traumatic brain injury 2).


Despite growing research on concussion, there is minimal evidence comparing the acute presentation of concussion between pediatric and adult patients. This cross-sectional study compares injury characteristics, symptoms, and neurologic examination in sport-related concussion based on age. Patients presenting to an outpatient sports neurology clinic for initial assessment of concussion within 7 days of injury were divided into 2 groups, 18 and older (n = 28) and 17 and younger (n = 107). There were no significant differences between pediatric and adult patients in any score of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool-3rd Edition symptom scale, neurologic examination category, pertinent elements of past medical history, or characteristics of the concussion. The pediatric group had higher average hours of sleep (8.1 ± 0.3 vs 7.1 ± 0.58; P = .03) and were less likely to wake refreshed (36.3% vs 65%; P = .02). The initial presentation of concussion within 7 days of injury will likely not differ by age, specifically 18 and older versus 17 and younger 3).


Pediatric athletes diagnosed with migraine headaches reported higher baseline symptom provocation scores on the VOMS. Athletes with migraine headaches also performed worse on the K-D test, further illustrating the influence of premorbid migraine headaches as a risk factor for elevated concussion assessment outcomes at baseline. Special consideration may be warranted for post-concussion assessment in athletes with migraine headaches 4).


Yengo-Kahn et al., conducted a systematic review of the SCAT and the evidence supporting its use to date.

English-language titles and abstracts published between 1995 and October 2015 were searched systematically across 4 electronic databases and a review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines adapted for the review of a heterogeneous collection of study designs. Peer-reviewed journal articles were included if they reported quantitative data on any iteration of the SCAT, Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC), or modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS) data at baseline or following concussion in an exclusively athlete population with any portion older than 13 years of age. Studies that included nonathletes, only children less than 13 years old, exclusively BESS data, exclusively symptom scale data, or a non-SCAT-related assessment were excluded. RESULTS The database search process yielded 549 abstracts, and 105 full-text articles were reviewed with 36 meeting criteria for inclusion. Nineteen studies were associated with the SAC, 1 was associated with the mBESS exclusively, and 16 studies were associated with a full iteration of the SCAT. The majority of these studies (56%) were prospective cohort studies. Male football players were the most common athletes studied. An analysis of the studies focused on baseline differences associated with age, sex, concussion history, and the ability to detect an SRC.

Looking toward the upcoming Concussion in Sport Group meeting in fall 2016, one may expect further revision to the SCAT3. However, based on this systematic review, the authors propose further, in-depth study of an already comprehensive concussion test, with acute, diagnostic, as well as long-term use 5).

References

1)

Yue JK, Phelps RRL, Chandra A, Winkler EA, Manley GT, Berger MS. Sideline Concussion Assessment: The Current State of the Art. Neurosurgery. 2020 Mar 3. pii: nyaa023. doi: 10.1093/neuros/nyaa022. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 32126135.
2)

Rădoi A, Poca MA, Gándara D, Castro L, Cevallos M, Pacios ME, Sahuquillo J. The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT2) for evaluating civilian mild traumatic brain injury. A pilot normative study. PLoS One. 2019 Feb 20;14(2):e0212541. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0212541. eCollection 2019. PubMed PMID: 30785950.
3)

Corti SJ, Pizzimenti NM, McCarthy MT, Essad KM, Kutcher JS. Comparing the Acute Presentation of Sport-Related Concussion in the Pediatric and Adult Populations. J Child Neurol. 2019 Jan 22:883073818825031. doi: 10.1177/0883073818825031. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30669942.
4)

Moran RN, Covassin T, Wallace J. Premorbid migraine history as a risk factor for vestibular and oculomotor baseline concussion assessment in pediatric athletes. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2019 Jan 11:1-6. doi: 10.3171/2018.10.PEDS18425. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30641840.
5)

Yengo-Kahn AM, Hale AT, Zalneraitis BH, Zuckerman SL, Sills AK, Solomon GS. The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool: a systematic review. Neurosurg Focus. 2016 Apr;40(4):E6. doi: 10.3171/2016.1.FOCUS15611. Review. PubMed PMID: 27032923.

Chronic subdural hematoma recurrence

Chronic subdural hematoma recurrence

Epidemiology

In 2 large cohorts of US patients, approximately 5% to 10% of patients who underwent surgery for nontraumatic SDH were required to undergo repeated operation within 30 to 90 days. These results may inform the design of future prospective studies and trials and help practitioners calibrate their index of suspicion to ensure that patients are referred for timely surgical care 1).

Recurrence rates after chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) evacuation with any of actual techniques twist drill craniostomy (TDC), burr hole craniostomy, craniotomy range from 5% to 30%. 2).

Grading

Oslo grading system.

Risk factors

In the series of Santos et al. it was possible to demonstrate an age-related protective factor, analyzed as a continuous variable, regarding the recurrence of the chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), with a lower rate of recurrence the higher the age.

The results indicate that, among possible factors associated with recurrence, only age presented a protective factor with statistical significance. The fact that no significant difference between the patients submitted to trepanning or craniotomy was found favors the preferential use of burr-hole surgery as a procedure of choice due to its fast and less complex execution 3).

In the series of Han et al. independent risk factors for recurrence were as follows: age > 75 years (HR 1.72, 95% CI 1.03-2.88; p = 0.039), obesity (body mass index ≥ 25.0 kg/m2), and a bilateral operation 4).

Chon et al. shown that postoperative midline shifting (≥5 mm), diabetes mellitus, preoperative seizure, preoperative width of hematoma (≥20 mm), and anticoagulant therapy were independent predictors of the recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

According to internal architecture of hematoma, the rate of recurrence was significantly lower in the homogeneous and the trabecular type than the laminar and separated type 5).


The recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma cSDH seems to be related to the excessive neoangiogenesis in the parietal membrane, which is mediated via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This is found to be elevated in the hematoma fluid and is dependent on eicosanoid/prostaglandin and thromboxane synthesis via cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2).

Anticoagulant therapy

see Chronic subdural hematoma and anticoagulant therapy.

Antiplatelet therapy

Antiplatelet therapy significantly influences the recurrence of CSDH 6).

Pneumocephalus

Remaining pneumocephalus is seen as an approved factor of recurrence 7) 8).

Septation

Jack et al.found a 12% reoperation rate. CSDH septation (seen on computed tomogram scan) was found to be an independent risk factor for recurrence requiring reoperation (p=0.04). Larger post-operative subdural haematoma volume was also significantly associated with requiring a second drainage procedure (p<0.001). Independent risk factors of larger post-operative haematoma volume included septations within a CSDH (p<0.01), increased pre-operative haematoma volume (p<0.01), and a greater amount of parenchymal atrophy (p=0.04). A simple scoring system for quantifying recurrence risk was created and validated based on patient age (< or ≥80 years), haematoma volume (< or ≥160cc), and presence of septations within the subdural collection (yes or no).

Septations within CSDHs are associated with larger post-operative residual haematoma collections requiring repeat drainage. When septations are clearly visible within a CSDH, craniotomy might be more suitable as a primary procedure as it allows greater access to a septated subdural collection. The proposed scoring system combining haematoma volume, age, and presence of septations might be useful in identifying patients at higher risk for recurrence 9).

Membranectomy

Opening the internal hematoma membrane does not alter the rate of patients requiring revision surgery and the number of patients showing a marked residual hematoma six weeks after evacuation of a CSDH 10).

In the study of Lee et al, an extended surgical approach with partial membranectomy has no advantages regarding the rate of reoperation and the outcome. As initial treatment, burr-hole drainage with irrigation of the hematoma cavity and closed-system drainage is recommended. Extended craniotomy with membranectomy is now reserved for instances of acute rebleeding with solid hematoma 11).

Diabetes

Surgeons should consider informing patients with diabetes mellitus that this comorbidity is associated with an increased likelihood of recurrence

12) 13) 14).


Balser et al. report 11% recurrence, which included individuals who recurred as late as 3 years after initial diagnosis 15).

Close imaging follow-up is important for CSDH patients for recurrence prediction. Using quantitative CT volumetric analysis, strong evidence was provided that changes in the residual fluid volume during the ‘self-resolution’ period can be used as significantly radiological predictors of recurrence 16).

A structural equation model showed a significant association between increased antiinflammatory activity in hematoma fluid samples and a lower risk of recurrence, but this relationship was not statistically significant in venous blood samples. Moreover, these findings indicate that anti-inflammatory activities in the hematoma may play a role in the risk of a recurrence of CSDH 17).

Irrigation with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACF) decreased the rate of CSDH recurrence 18).

Treatment

There is no definite operative procedure for patients with intractable chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH).

Most recurrent hematomas are managed successfully with burr hole craniostomies with postoperative closed-system drainage. Refractory hematomas may be managed with a variety of techniques, including craniotomy or subdural-peritoneal shunt placement 19).

Although many studies have reported risk factors or treatments in efforts to prevent recurrence, those have focused on single recurrence, and little cumulative data is available to analyze refractory CSDH.

Matsumoto et al. defined refractory CSDH as ≥2 recurrences, then analyzed and compared clinical factors between patients with single recurrence and those with refractory CSDH in a cohort study, to clarify whether patients with refractory CSDH experience different or more risk factors than patients with single recurrence, and whether burr-hole irrigation with closed-system drainage reduces refractory CSDH.

Seventy-five patients had at least one recurrence, with single recurrence in 62 patients and ≥2 recurrences in 13 patients. In comparing clinical characteristics, patients with refractory CSDH were significantly younger (P=0.04) and showed shorter interval to first recurrence (P<0.001). Organized CSDH was also significantly associated with refractory CSDH (P=0.02). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified first recurrence interval <1 month (OR 6.66, P<0.001) and age <71 years (OR 4.16, P<0.001) as independent risk factors for refractory CSDH. On the other hand, burr-hole irrigation with closed-system drainage did not reduce refractory CSDH.

When patients with risk factors for refractory CSDH experience recurrence, alternative surgical procedures may be considered as the second surgery, because burr-hole irrigation with closed-system drainage did not reduce refractory CSDH 20).

Implantation of a reservoir 21) 22) 23).

Subdural-peritoneal shunt 24).

Middle meningeal artery embolization

Embolization of the MMA is effective for refractory CSDH or CSDH patients with a risk of recurrence, and is considered an effective therapeutic method to stop hematoma enlargement and promote resolution 25) 26) 27) 28) 29) 30).

A pilot study indicated that perioperative middle meningeal artery (MMA) embolization could be offered as the least invasive and most effectual means of treatment for resistant patients of CSDHs with 1 or more recurrences 31).

Chihara et al. have treated three cases of CSDH with MMA embolization to date, but there was a postoperative recurrence in one patient, which required a craniotomy for hematoma removal and capsulectomy. MMA embolization blocks the blood supply from the dura to the hematoma outer membrane in order to prevent recurrences of refractory CSDH. Histopathologic examination of the outer membrane of the hematoma excised during craniotomy showed foreign-body giant cells and neovascular proliferation associated with embolization. Because part of the hematoma was organized in this case, the CSDH did not resolve when the MMA was occluded, and the development of new collateral pathways in the hematoma outer membrane probably contributed to the recurrence. Therefore, in CSDH with some organized hematoma, MMA embolization may not be effective. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be performed in these patients before embolization 32).

Case series

see Chronic subdural hematoma recurrence case series.

Case reports

Chronic subdural hematoma recurrence case reports.

References

1)

Knopman J, Link TW, Navi BB, Murthy SB, Merkler AE, Kamel H. Rates of Repeated Operation for Isolated Subdural Hematoma Among Older Adults. JAMA Netw Open. 2018 Oct 5;1(6):e183737. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.3737. PubMed PMID: 30646255.
2)

Escosa Baé M, Wessling H, Salca HC, de Las Heras Echeverría P. Use of twist-drill craniostomy with drain in evacuation of chronic subdural hematomas: independent predictors of recurrence. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2011 May;153(5):1097-103. doi: 10.1007/s00701-010-0903-3. Epub 2010 Dec 31. PubMed PMID: 21193935.
3)

Santos RGD, Xander PAW, Rodrigues LHDS, Costa GHFD, Veiga JCE, Aguiar GB. Analysis of predisposing factors for chronic subdural hematoma recurrence. Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992). 2019 Jul 22;65(6):834-838. doi: 10.1590/1806-9282.65.6.834. PubMed PMID: 31340313.
4)

Han MH, Ryu JI, Kim CH, Kim JM, Cheong JH, Yi HJ. Predictive factors for recurrence and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic subdural hematoma. J Neurosurg. 2017 Nov;127(5):1117-1125. doi: 10.3171/2016.8.JNS16867. Epub 2016 Dec 16. PubMed PMID: 27982768.
5)

Chon KH, Lee JM, Koh EJ, Choi HY. Independent predictors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2012 Sep;154(9):1541-8. doi: 10.1007/s00701-012-1399-9. Epub 2012 Jun 1. PubMed PMID: 22653496.
6)

Wada M, Yamakami I, Higuchi Y, Tanaka M, Suda S, Ono J, Saeki N. Influence of antiplatelet therapy on postoperative recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma: a multicenter retrospective study in 719 patients. Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2014 May;120:49-54. doi: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2014.02.007. Epub 2014 Feb 24. PubMed PMID: 24731576.
7)

Mori K, Maeda M (2001) Surgical treatment of chronic subdural hematoma in 500 consecutive cases: clinical characteristics, surgical outcome, complications, and recurrence rate. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo) 41:371–381
8)

Stanišić M, Hald J, Rasmussen IA, Pripp AH, Ivanović J, Kolstad F, Sundseth J, Züchner M, Lindegaard KF (2013) Volume and densities of chronic subdural haematoma obtained from CT imaging as predictors of postoperative recurrence: a prospective study of 107 operated patients. Acta Neurochir 155:323–333
9)

Jack A, O’Kelly C, McDougall C, Max Findlay J. Predicting Recurrence after Chronic Subdural Haematoma Drainage. Can J Neurol Sci. 2015 Jan 5:1-6. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25557536.
10)

Unterhofer C, Freyschlag CF, Thomé C, Ortler M. Opening the Internal Hematoma Membrane does not Alter the Recurrence Rate of Chronic Subdural Hematomas – A Prospective Randomized Trial. World Neurosurg. 2016 May 2. pii: S1878-8750(16)30210-8. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2016.04.081. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 27150644.
11)

Lee JY, Ebel H, Ernestus RI, Klug N. Various surgical treatments of chronic subdural hematoma and outcome in 172 patients: is membranectomy necessary? Surg Neurol. 2004 Jun;61(6):523-7; discussion 527-8. PubMed PMID: 15165784.
12)

Matsumoto K, Akagi K, Abekura M, Ryujin H, Ohkawa M, Iwasa N, Akiyama C. Recurrence factors for chronic subdural hematomas after burr-hole craniostomy and closed system drainage. Neurol Res. 1999 Apr;21(3):277-80. PubMed PMID: 10319336.
13)

Yamamoto H, Hirashima Y, Hamada H, Hayashi N, Origasa H, Endo S. Independent predictors of recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma: results of multivariate analysis performed using a logistic regression model. J Neurosurg. 2003 Jun;98(6):1217-21. PubMed PMID: 12816267.
14)

Pang CH, Lee SE, Kim CH, Kim JE, Kang HS, Park CK, Paek SH, Kim CH, Jahng TA, Kim JW, Kim YH, Kim DG, Chung CK, Jung HW, Yoo H. Acute intracranial bleeding and recurrence after bur hole craniostomy for chronic subdural hematoma. J Neurosurg. 2015 Jul;123(1):65-74. doi: 10.3171/2014.12.JNS141189. Epub 2015 Feb 13. PubMed PMID: 25679282.
15)

Balser D, Rodgers SD, Johnson B, Shi C, Tabak E, Samadani U. Evolving management of symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma: experience of a single institution and review of the literature. Neurol Res. 2013 Apr;35(3):233-42. doi: 10.1179/1743132813Y.0000000166. Review. PubMed PMID: 23485050.
16)

Xu FF, Chen JH, Leung GK, Hao SY, Xu L, Hou ZG, Mao X, Shi GZ, Li JS, Liu BY. Quantitative computer tomography analysis of post-operative subdural fluid volume predicts recurrence of chronic subdural haematoma. Brain Inj. 2014;28(8):1121-6. doi: 10.3109/02699052.2014.910702. Epub 2014 May 6. PubMed PMID: 24801643.
17)

Pripp AH, Stanišić M. The Correlation between Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines in Chronic Subdural Hematoma Patients Assessed with Factor Analysis. PLoS One. 2014 Feb 27;9(2):e90149. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090149. eCollection 2014. PubMed PMID: 24587250.
18)

Adachi A, Higuchi Y, Fujikawa A, Machida T, Sueyoshi S, Harigaya K, Ono J, Saeki N. Risk factors in chronic subdural hematoma: comparison of irrigation with artificial cerebrospinal fluid and normal saline in a cohort analysis. PLoS One. 2014 Aug 4;9(8):e103703. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0103703. eCollection 2014. PubMed PMID: 25089621; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4121178.
19)

Desai VR, Scranton RA, Britz GW. Management of Recurrent Subdural Hematomas. Neurosurg Clin N Am. 2017 Apr;28(2):279-286. doi: 10.1016/j.nec.2016.11.010. Epub 2017 Jan 4. Review. PubMed PMID: 28325462.
20)

Matsumoto H, Hanayama H, Okada T, Sakurai Y, Minami H, Masuda A, Tominaga S, Miyaji K, Yamaura I, Yoshida Y, Yoshida K. Clinical investigation of refractory chronic subdural hematoma: a comparison of clinical factors between single and repeated recurrences. World Neurosurg. 2017 Aug 24. pii: S1878-8750(17)31402-X. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.08.101. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28844917.
21)

Sato M, Iwatsuki K, Akiyama C, Masana Y, Yoshimine T, Hayakawa T. [Use of Ommaya CSF reservoir for refractory chronic subdural hematoma]. No Shinkei Geka. 1999 Apr;27(4):323-8. Japanese. PubMed PMID: 10347846.
22)

Sato M, Iwatsuki K, Akiyama C, Kumura E, Yoshimine T. Implantation of a reservoir for refractory chronic subdural hematoma. Neurosurgery. 2001 Jun;48(6):1297-301. PubMed PMID: 11383733.
23)

Laumer R. Implantation of a reservoir for refractory chronic subdural hematoma. Neurosurgery. 2002 Mar;50(3):672. PubMed PMID: 11841742.
24)

Misra M, Salazar JL, Bloom DM. Subdural-peritoneal shunt: treatment for bilateral chronic subdural hematoma. Surg Neurol. 1996 Oct;46(4):378-83. PubMed PMID: 8876720.
25)

Mandai S, Sakurai M, Matsumoto Y. Middle meningeal artery embolization for refractory chronic subdural hematoma. Case report. J Neurosurg. 2000 Oct;93(4):686-8. PubMed PMID: 11014549.
26)

Takahashi K, Muraoka K, Sugiura T, Maeda Y, Mandai S, Gohda Y, Kawauchi M, Matsumoto Y. [Middle meningeal artery embolization for refractory chronic subdural hematoma: 3 case reports]. No Shinkei Geka. 2002 May;30(5):535-9. Japanese. PubMed PMID: 11993178.
27)

Hirai S, Ono J, Odaki M, Serizawa T, Nagano O. Embolization of the Middle Meningeal Artery for Refractory Chronic Subdural Haematoma. Usefulness for Patients under Anticoagulant Therapy. Interv Neuroradiol. 2004 Dec 24;10 Suppl 2:101-4. Epub 2008 May 15. PubMed PMID: 20587257; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3522210.
28)

Tsukamoto Y, Oishi M, Shinbo J, Fujii Y. Transarterial embolisation for refractory bilateral chronic subdural hematomas in a case with dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2011 May;153(5):1145-7. doi: 10.1007/s00701-010-0891-3. Epub 2010 Dec 2. PubMed PMID: 21125409.
29)

Mino M, Nishimura S, Hori E, Kohama M, Yonezawa S, Midorikawa H, Kaimori M, Tanaka T, Nishijima M. Efficacy of middle meningeal artery embolization in the treatment of refractory chronic subdural hematoma. Surg Neurol Int. 2010 Dec 13;1:78. doi: 10.4103/2152-7806.73801. PubMed PMID: 21206540; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3011107.
30)

Hashimoto T, Ohashi T, Watanabe D, Koyama S, Namatame H, Izawa H, Haraoka R, Okada H, Ichimasu N, Akimoto J, Haraoka J. Usefulness of embolization of the middle meningeal artery for refractory chronic subdural hematomas. Surg Neurol Int. 2013 Aug 19;4:104. doi: 10.4103/2152-7806.116679. eCollection 2013. PubMed PMID: 24032079; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3766342.
31)

Kim E. Embolization Therapy for Refractory Hemorrhage in Patients with Chronic Subdural Hematomas. World Neurosurg. 2017 May;101:520-527. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.02.070. Epub 2017 Feb 27. PubMed PMID: 28249828.
32)

Chihara H, Imamura H, Ogura T, Adachi H, Imai Y, Sakai N. Recurrence of a Refractory Chronic Subdural Hematoma after Middle Meningeal Artery Embolization That Required Craniotomy. NMC Case Rep J. 2014 May 9;1(1):1-5. doi: 10.2176/nmccrj.2013-0343. eCollection 2014 Oct. PubMed PMID: 28663942; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5364934.

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