Acute ischemic stroke treatment

Acute ischemic stroke treatment

In the complete absence of blood flowneuronal death occurs within 2–3 minutes from the exhaustion of energy stores. However, in most strokes, there is a salvageable penumbra (tissue at risk) that retains viability for a period of time through suboptimal perfusion from collaterals. Local cerebral edema from the stroke results in a compromise of these collaterals and progression of the ischemic penumbra to infarction if the flow is not restored and maintained. Prevention of this secondary neuronal injury drives the treatment of stroke and has led to the creation of designated Primary Stroke Centers that offer appropriate and timely triage and treatment of all potential stroke patients.

Time delays from initial CTA acquisition to neuroendovascular surgery (NES) team notification can prevent expedient treatment with endovascular thrombectomy (ET). Process improvements and automated stroke detection on imaging with automated notification of the NES team may ultimately improve the time to reperfusion 1).

American Heart Association Guidelines for the Early Management of Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke

see Endovascular intervention for ischemic stroke treatment..

see Hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke treatment.


Brain ischemia and treatment are one of the important topics in neurological science. Free oxygen radicals and inflammation formed after ischemia are accepted as the most important causes of damage. Currently, there are studies on many chemopreventive agents to prevent cerebral ischemia damage. The aim of Aras et al is to research the preventive effect of the active ingredient in genistein There is currently no promising pharmacotherapy aside from intravenous or intra-arterial thrombolysis. Yet because of the narrow therapeutic time window involved, thrombolytic application is very restricted in clinical settings. Accumulating data suggest that non-pharmaceutical therapies for stroke might provide new opportunities for stroke treatment 2).

Progression of focal stroke symptoms still constitutes a serious clinical problem for which heparin has insufficient effectiveness in clinical practice. New therapies, ideally preventive, are needed 3).

Omega 3 fatty acid enhance cerebral angiogenesis and provide long-term protection after stroke 4).

After cerebral ischemia, revascularization in the ischemic boundary zone provides nutritive blood flow as well as various growth factors to promote the survival and activity of neurons and neural progenitor cells. Enhancement of angiogenesis and the resulting improvement of cerebral microcirculation are key restorative mechanisms and represent an important therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke.

Improvements in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) outcomes have been achieved with intravenous thrombolytics (IVT) and intra-arterial thrombolytics vs supportive medical therapy. Given its ease of administration, noninvasiveness, and most validated efficacy, IVT is the standard of care in AIS patients without contraindications to systemic fibrinolysis. However, patients with large-vessel occlusions respond poorly to IVT. Recent trials designed to select this population for randomization to IVT vs IVT with adjunctive endovascular therapy have not shown improvement in clinical outcomes with endovascular therapy. This could be due to the lack of utilization of modern thrombectomy devices such as Penumbra aspiration devices, Solitaire stent-trievers, or Trevo stent-trievers, which have shown the best recanalization results. Continued improvement in the techniques with using these devices as well as randomized controlled trials using them is warranted 5).

With the emergence of new technologies in imaging, thrombolysis and endovascular intervention, the treatment modalities of acute ischemic stroke will enter a new era 6).

Within 3 h from symptom onset, the existence of FLAIR-positive lesions on pretreatment MRI is significantly associated with an increased bleeding risk due to systemic thrombolysis. Therefore, considering FLAIR-positive lesions on baseline MRI might guide treatment decisions in ischemic stroke 7).

see Acute ischemic stroke thrombolysis

see Blood Pressure Management


1)

Yaeger KA, Rossitto CP, Marayati NF, Lara-Reyna J, Ladner T, Hardigan T, Shoirah H, Mocco J, Fifi JT. Time from image acquisition to endovascular team notification: a new target for enhancing acute stroke workflow. J Neurointerv Surg. 2021 Apr 8:neurintsurg-2021-017297. doi: 10.1136/neurintsurg-2021-017297. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33832969.
2)

Chen F, Qi Z, Luo Y, Hinchliffe T, Ding G, Xia Y, Ji X. Non-pharmaceutical therapies for stroke: Mechanisms and clinical implications. Prog Neurobiol. 2014 Jan 6. pii: S0301-0082(13)00147-0. doi: 10.1016/j.pneurobio.2013.12.007. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 24407111.
3)

Rödén-Jüllig A, Britton M. Effectiveness of heparin treatment for progressing ischaemic stroke: before and after study. J Intern Med. 2000 Oct;248(4):287-91. PubMed PMID: 11086638.
4)

Wang J, Shi Y, Zhang L, Zhang F, Hu X, Zhang W, Leak RK, Gao Y, Chen L, Chen J. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enhance cerebral angiogenesis and provide long-term protection after stroke. Neurobiol Dis. 2014 Apr 29. pii: S0969-9961(14)00103-X. doi: 10.1016/j.nbd.2014.04.014. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 24794156.
5)

Serrone JC, Jimenez L, Ringer AJ. The role of endovascular therapy in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Neurosurgery. 2014 Feb;74 Suppl 1:S133-41. doi: 10.1227/NEU.0000000000000224. PubMed PMID: 24402482.
6)

Lu AY, Ansari SA, Nyström KV, Damisah EC, Amin HP, Matouk CC, Pashankar RD,Bulsara KR. Intra-arterial treatment of acute ischemic stroke: the continued evolution. Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med. 2014 Feb;16(2):281. doi:10.1007/s11936-013-0281-2. PubMed PMID: 24398801.
7)

Hobohm C, Fritzsch D, Budig S, Classen J, Hoffmann KT, Michalski D. Predicting intracerebral hemorrhage by baseline magnetic resonance imaging in stroke patients undergoing systemic thrombolysis. Acta Neurol Scand. 2014 Jul 18. doi: 10.1111/ane.12272. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25040041.

Sinus pericranii treatment

Sinus pericranii treatment

Accepted guidelines or recommendations concerning the managementdiagnosis, and treatment of sinus pericranii are still lacking.

Angiography plays a crucial role in the classification of SP and choice of the optimal treatment. Only accessory SP is amenable to treatment, whereas dominant SP must be preserved.

Ellis et al describe a simple and unique method for determining whether intracranial venous outflow may be compromised by sinus pericranii treatment. This involves performing catheter angiography while the lesion is temporarily obliterated by external compression. Analysis of intracranial venous outflow in this setting allows visualization of angiographic changes that will occur once the sinus pericranii is permanently obliterated. Thus, the safety of surgical intervention can be more fully appraised using this technique 1).


There were notable improvements following surgical resection for the abnormal venous lesions and several sclerotherapies 2)


Intraoperative hemostasis is essential while sinus pericranii is detached from the craniumHemostatic agents such as bone wax or absorbable gelatin and heat coagulation seem to be useful. However, complicative hemorrhage concerning to the preceded technique has been also reported. To detect minor shunting points between the sinus pericranii and the intracranial veins, the major venous connection can be manually compressed. Intraoperative manual compression of a major venous connection of sinus pericranii can be an option to manage intraoperative bleeding 3).

The endovascular approach is becoming increasingly relevant and has proven to be safe and effective 4).

The surgical treatment involves the resection of the extracranial venous package and ligation of the emissary communicating vein. In some cases of SP, surgical excision is performed for cosmetic reasons. The endovascular technique has been described by transvenous approach combined with direct puncture and the recently endovascular embolization with Onyx 5).


1)

Ellis JA, Mejia Munne JC, Feldstein NA, Meyers PM. Determination of sinus pericranii resectability by external compression during angiography: technical note. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2015 Oct 16:1-5. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 26474103.
2)

Ryu JY, Lee JH, Lee JS, Lee JW, Lee SJ, Lee JM, Lee SY, Huh S, Kim JY, Hwang SK, Chung HY. Combined treatment of surgery and sclerotherapy for sinus pericranii. Arch Craniofac Surg. 2020 Apr;21(2):109-113. doi: 10.7181/acfs.2019.00521. Epub 2020 Apr 20. PMID: 32380811; PMCID: PMC7206457.
3)

Fujimoto Y, Ishibashi R, Maki Y, Kitagawa M, Kinosada M, Kurosaki Y, Ikeda H, Chin M. A Simple Surgical Technique for Pediatric Sinus Pericranii: Intraoperative Manual Compression of a Major Shunting Point. Pediatr Neurosurg. 2021 Mar 29:1-6. doi: 10.1159/000514478. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33780955.
4)

Pavanello M, Melloni I, Antichi E, Severino M, Ravegnani M, Piatelli G, Cama A, Rossi A, Gandolfo C. Sinus pericranii: diagnosis and management in 21 pediatric patients. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2015 Jan;15(1):60-70. doi: 10.3171/2014.9.PEDS13641. PubMed PMID: 25360854.
5)

Rangel-Castilla L, Krishna C, Klucznik R, Diaz O. Endovascular embolization with Onyx in the management of sinus pericranii: a case report. Neurosurg Focus. 2009 Nov;27(5):E13. doi: 10.3171/2009.8.FOCUS09170. PubMed PMID: 19877791.

Moyamoya disease classification

Moyamoya disease classification

The ischemic and hemorrhagic subtypes are difficult to diagnose prior to disease onset.

The intralateral and perilateral ventricular arteries on the original axial Time of flight magnetic resonance angiography images might suggest the hemorrhagic type of moyamoya disease prior to onset 1).

Unilateral and bilateral moyamoya disease (MMD).

Quasi Moyamoya disease

Asymptomatic Moyamoya Disease

Ischemic-type Moyamoya Disease

Suzuki and Kodoma classified the severity of moyamoya disease by progression of an occlusive process and the eventual appearance of collaterals based on serial cerebral angiographic evaluations and staged them, known as ‘Suzuki stages of Moyamoya disease’ which are mentioned under staging.

see Suzuki staging.


Traditional moyamoya disease (MMD) classification relies on morphological digital subtraction angiography (DSA) assessment, which do not reflect hemodynamic status, clinical symptoms, or surgical treatment outcome.

The Berlin MMD grading system is able to stratify preoperative hemispheric symptomatology. Furthermore, it correlated with postoperative new ischemic changes on MRI, and showed a strong trend in predicting clinical postoperative stroke. 2)


Ladner et al performed digital subtraction angiography and noninvasive structural and hemodynamic MRI, and they outline a new classification system for patients with moyamoya that they have named Prior Infarcts, Reactivity, and Angiography in Moyamoya Disease (PIRAMD).

Healthy control volunteers (n = 11; age 46 ± 12 years [mean ± SD]) and patients (n = 25; 42 ± 13.5 years) with angiographically confirmed moyamoya provided informed consent and underwent structural (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, FLAIR, MR angiography) and hemodynamic (T2*- and cerebral blood flow-weighted) 3-T MRI. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in the internal carotid artery territory was assessed using susceptibility-weighted MRI during a hypercapnic stimulus. Only hemispheres without prior revascularization were assessed. Each hemisphere was considered symptomatic if localizing signs were present on neurological examination and/or there was a history of transient ischemic attack with symptoms referable to that hemisphere. The PIRAMD factor weighting versus symptomatology was optimized using binary logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis with bootstrapping. The PIRAMD finding was scored from 0 to 10. For each hemisphere, 1 point was assigned for prior infarct, 3 points for reduced CVR, 3 points for a modified Suzuki Score ≥ Grade II, and 3 points for flow impairment in ≥ 2 of 7 predefined vascular territories. Hemispheres were divided into 3 severity grades based on total PIRAMD score, as follows: Grade 1, 0-5 points; Grade 2, 6-9 points; and Grade 3, 10 points.

In 28 of 46 (60.9%) hemispheres the findings met clinical symptomatic criteria. With decreased CVR, the odds ratio of having a symptomatic hemisphere was 13 (95% CI 1.1-22.6, p = 0.002). The area under the curve for individual PIRAMD factors was 0.67-0.72, and for the PIRAMD grade it was 0.845. There were 0/8 (0%), 10/18 (55.6%), and 18/20 (90%) symptomatic PIRAMD Grade 1, 2, and 3 hemispheres, respectively.

A scoring system for total impairment is proposed that uses noninvasive MRI parameters. This scoring system correlates with symptomatology and may provide a measure of hemodynamic severity in moyamoya, which could be used for guiding management decisions and evaluating intervention response 3).


In 2014 Hung et al. proposed a quantitative method using color-coded parametric quantitative DSA (QDSA) to improve prediction of the severity of MMD. The Td significantly correlated with conventional angiographic grading and with the status of hemodynamic impairment in patients with MMD. QDSA and Td measurements can provide a simple and quantitative angiographic grading system for patients with MMD. 4).


1)

Ishikawa M, Terao S, Kagami H, Inaba M, Naritaka H. Intralateral and Perilateral Ventricular Arteries on Original Axial Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Adult Moyamoya Disease. Eur Neurol. 2021 Mar 29:1-5. doi: 10.1159/000514429. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33780954.
2)

Teo M, Furtado S, Kaneko OF, Azad TD, Madhugiri V, Do HM, Steinberg GK. Validation and Application for the Berlin Grading System of Moyamoya Disease in Adult Patients. Neurosurgery. 2020 Feb 1;86(2):203-212. doi: 10.1093/neuros/nyz025. PMID: 30864668.
3)

Ladner TR, Donahue MJ, Arteaga DF, Faraco CC, Roach BA, Davis LT, Jordan LC, Froehler MT, Strother MK. Prior Infarcts, Reactivity, and Angiography in Moyamoya Disease (PIRAMD): a scoring system for moyamoya severity based on multimodal hemodynamic imaging. J Neurosurg. 2016 Mar 11:1-9. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 26967789.
4)

Hung SC, Liang ML, Lin CF, Lin CJ, Guo WY, Chang FC, Wong TT, Chang CY. New grading of moyamoya disease using color-coded parametric quantitative digital subtraction angiography. J Chin Med Assoc. 2014 Aug;77(8):437-42. doi: 10.1016/j.jcma.2014.05.007. Epub 2014 Jul 12. PMID: 25028291.
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