The Neuromodulation Casebook

The Neuromodulation Casebook

by Jeffrey Arle (Editor)

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The Neuromodulation Casebook is a case-based volume for practical, hands-on decision-making using realistic case examples from the field of neuromodulation. It encompasses a variety of techniques and therapies, ranging from deep brain stimulation for a multitude of disorders to spinal cord stimulation, peripheral nerve stimulation, cortical stimulation, and cranial nerve stimulation, as well as non-invasive therapies and other implanted types of devices that interface with the nervous system. Allowing readers to better learn via case-based examples, this practical volume depicts real examples of decisions neuroscientists and neurosurgeons need to make every day from leaders in the field.

This book serves as a companion text to the editor’s previous titles Essential Neuromodulation and Innovative Neuromodulation for neuroscience, neural engineering, and biomedical engineering courses.


About the Author

Jeff Arle, MD, PhD, FAANS

Dr. Arle is currently the Associate Chief of Neurosurgery at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, the Chief of Neurosurgery at Mt. Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, and an Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at Harvard Medical School. He received his BA in Biopsychology from Columbia University in 1986 and his MD and PhD from the University of Connecticut in 1992. His dissertation work for his doctorate in Biomedical Sciences was in computational modeling in the Cochlear Nucleus. He then went on to do a residency in neurosurgery at the University of Pennsylvania, incorporating a double fellowship in movement disorder surgery and epilepsy surgery under Drs. Patrick Kelly, Ron Alterman, and Werner Doyle, finishing in 1999.

He edited the companion text Essential Neuromodulation with Dr. Shils, the first edition published by Elsevier in 2011. He has now practiced in the field of functional neurosurgery for 17 years and is experienced in all areas of neuromodulation from deep brain stimulators to vagus nerve, spinal cord, peripheral nerve, and motor cortex stimulators, contributing frequent peer-reviewed publications and numerous chapters to the literature on many aspects of the neuromodulation field. He currently serves as an associate editor at the journals Neuromodulation and Neurosurgery, is the co-chair of the Research and Scientific Policy Committee for the International Neuromodulation Society, and is on the Board of Directors for the International Society for Intraoperative Neurophysiology. His long-standing research interests are in the area of computational modeling in the understanding and improved design of devices used in neuromodulation treatments.

Giant pituitary adenoma

Giant pituitary adenoma

Epidemiology

Giant pituitary adenomas comprise about 6-10% of all pituitary tumors.

It is estimated that 5% of pituitary adenoma become invasive and may grow to gigantic sizes (>4 cm in diameter).

They are mostly clinically non-functioning adenomas and occur predominantly in males 1)

Types

Clinical

The presenting symptoms are usually secondary to compression of neighboring structures, but also due to partial or total hypopituitarismFunctioning pituitary adenomas give rise to specific symptoms of hormonal hypersecretion.

Treatment

The use of dopamine agonists is considered a first-line treatment in patients with giant macroprolactinomas. Somatostatin analogs can also be used as primary treatment in cases of growth hormone and thyrotropin producing giant adenomas, although remission of the disease is not achieved in the vast majority of these patients.

The intrinsic complexity of these tumors requires the use of different therapies in a combined or sequential way. A multimodal approach and a therapeutic strategy involving a multidisciplinary team of expert professionals form the basis of the therapeutic success in these patients 2).


The main goal of surgical treatment of giant pituitary adenoma is maximum possible tumor extirpation with minimal side effects, which can be achieved by careful preoperative planning of operative approach, based on directions of tumor extensions and invasiveness. Maximal surgical removal of giant adenomas offers best chances to control tumor growth when followed with adjuvant medical and radiation therapies 3).


While the use of endoscopic approaches has become increasingly accepted in the resection of pituitary adenomas, limited evidence exists regarding the success of this technique for patients with large and giant pituitary adenomas.

Major blood supply of giant pituitary adenomas originates from branches of the infraclinoidal portion of the internal carotid artery, different from normal anterior pituitary gland. Surgical route should depend not only on tumor shape and extension but on feeding systems 4).

The main goal of surgical treatment of giant pituitary adenoma is maximum possible tumor extirpation with minimal side effects, which can be achieved by careful preoperative planning of operative approach, based on directions of tumor extensions and invasiveness. Maximal surgical removal of giant adenomas offers best chances to control tumor growth when followed with adjuvant medical and radiation therapies 5).


In cases of progressive enlargement of residual lesions, a second endoscopic debulking of the tumor may be considered for control of the disease 6).

Outcome

Giant pituitary adenomas carry higher surgical risks despite recent advances in microsurgical and/or endoscopic surgery, and postoperative acute catastrophic changes without major vessel disturbance are still extremely difficult to predict, may manifest as postoperative pituitary apoplexy, and are associated with very poor outcomes.

Resection of both large and giant pituitary adenomas by microscopic transsphenoidal surgery may be safe and effective surgical technique with low morbidity and mortality 7).

Case series

References

1) , 2)

Iglesias P, Rodríguez Berrocal V, Díez JJ. Giant pituitary adenoma: histological types, clinical features and therapeutic approaches. Endocrine. 2018 Sep;61(3):407-421. doi: 10.1007/s12020-018-1645-x. Epub 2018 Jun 16. Review. PubMed PMID: 29909598.
3)

Sinha S, Sharma BS. Giant pituitary adenomas–an enigma revisited. Microsurgical treatment strategies and outcome in a series of 250 patients. Br J Neurosurg. 2010 Feb;24(1):31-9. doi: 10.3109/02688690903370305. PubMed PMID: 20158350.
4)

Ogawa Y, Sato K, Matsumoto Y, Tominaga T. Evaluation of Fine Feeding System and Angioarchitecture of Giant Pituitary Adenoma – Implications for Establishment of Surgical Strategy. World Neurosurg. 2015 Oct 5. pii: S1878-8750(15)01255-3. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2015.09.087. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 26455764.
5)

Sinha S, Sharma BS. Giant pituitary adenomas–an enigma revisited. Microsurgical treatment strategies and outcome in a series of 250 patients. Br J Neurosurg. 2010 Feb;24(1):31-9. doi: 10.3109/02688690903370305. PubMed PMID: 20158350.
6)

Gondim JA, Almeida JP, Albuquerque LA, Gomes EF, Schops M. Giant pituitary adenomas: surgical outcomes of 50 cases operated on by the endonasal endoscopic approach. World Neurosurg. 2014 Jul-Aug;82(1-2):e281-90. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2013.08.028. Epub 2013 Aug 29. PubMed PMID: 23994073.
7)

Karki M, Sun J, Yadav CP, Zhao B. Large and giant pituitary adenoma resection by microscopic trans-sphenoidal surgery: Surgical outcomes and complications in 123 consecutive patients. J Clin Neurosci. 2017 Aug 1. pii: S0967-5868(16)30922-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2017.07.015. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28778803.

Ossified chronic subdural hematoma

Ossified chronic subdural hematoma

Calcified chronic subdural hematoma or ossified chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), characterized by slowly progressing neurological symptoms, is a rarely seen entity that may remain asymptomatic for many years.

Incidence of calcified or ossified CSDH is high in certain countries, including the USAJapan and Turkey, with a steady increase in recent years 1).

They should be considered in the differential diagnosis at the time when we encounter because of its infrequency and variable clinical manifestation, following shunting in children or head trauma in adults 2).

Differential diagnosis

Calcified epidural hematoma, calcified empyema, meningioma, calcified arachnoid cyst, and calcified convexity of the dura mater with acute epidural hematoma should be considered for the differential diagnosis 3).

Treatment

Management of CSDH has improved dramatically in recent years thanks to advances in diagnostic tools, but there is still some controversy regarding the optimal treatment strategy.

Systematic reviews

In a systematic review, PRISMA guidelines were followed to query existing online databases between January 1930 and December 2018. We found a total of 88 articles containing 114 cases of calcified or ossified CSDH, 83 patients operated and 31 ones not operated.

There were 78 males and 29 females (7 with unreported gender) from 25 countries, ages ranging from 4 months to 86 years (mean 33.7 years), with etiologies of head trauma in 33.3%, shunting for hydrocephalus in 27.2%, or following cranial surgery in 4.4%. The duration of symptoms ranged from acute onset to 20 years, with a mean of 24.1 months. Imaging techniques such as X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging were used with pathological confirmation of CSDH and complete recovery in 56.4% of patients.

Incidence of calcified or ossified CSDH is high in certain countries, including the USAJapan and Turkey, with a steady increase in recent years. Therapy of choice is surgery in these patients and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis at the time when we encounter because of its infrequency and variable clinical manifestation, following shunting in children or head trauma in adults 4).


Yang X, Qian Z, Qiu Y, Li X. Diagnosis and Management of Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma. J Craniofac Surg. 2015 Sep;26(6):e550-1. doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000002025. PubMed PMID: 26352368.

Case reports

A 59-year-old man presented with epileptic seizures interpreted as episodic syncope in the past 3 years and the patient had a history of head trauma about 4 years ago. Computed tomography revealed an ossified chronic subdural hematoma involving the right frontotemporoparietal region, which was totally resected using microsurgical technique. Postoperatively, weakness developed in the right arm and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a bilateral tension pneumocephalus, which was immediately treated by a left frontal burr hole trepanation, and the patient was discharged uneventfully 5).


A 46-year-old man with a history of alcohol abuse and a right frontotemporoparietal and left frontal ossified CSH that was diagnosed 2 years previously presented with headache and memory loss over 6 days. The patient was being followed with serial imaging, which showed the static state of the mass and no other lesions 7 months before admission. He underwent right frontotemporoparietal craniectomy to remove the ossified CSH and tumor. When the bone was lifted and the thin dura was opened, a hard, thick, ossified capsule was observed. No apparent tumor invasion was noted in the skull or epidural space. Despite refusing further chemotherapy and radiation therapy, the patient has been disease-free and working for 5 years.

Based on reported cases and relevant literature, large B-cell lymphoma may be associated with ossified CSH 6).


A 81-year-old woman with calcified chronic subdural hematoma. The patient underwent an osteoplastic left craniotomy, evacuation of chronic subdural mass with careful dissection and successful removal of the inner and outer membrane. Postoperative CT scan showed removal of subdural hematoma, a decrease of the left shift of median line and good brain re-expansion. The postoperative period was without any serious complications.

The subdural hematoma was successfully removed, resulting in a good recovery with complete resolution of patient’s symptoms. They highly recommend surgical treatment in cases of chronic symptomatic calcified subdural hematomas 7).


A Giant Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma 8).


Fang et al. reported a case of ossified chronic subdural hematoma in a 7-year-old female child, with a literature review 9).


Siddiqui et al. reported one case with diabetes insipidus 10).


A young girl affected by a syndromal hydrocephalus who developed a bilateral ossified chronic subdural hematoma with the typical radiological appearance of “the armored brain”. Bilateral calcified chronic subdural hematoma is a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. There is controversy in the treatment, but most published literature discourages a surgical intervention to remove the calcifications 11).


Turgut et al. published one Ossified chronic subdural hematoma 12).


A 22-year-old male who had presented with severe headache consequent to brain compression caused by bifronto-parieto-temporal ossified subdural hematoma. We evaluated our method and surgical intervention in the light of the literature. The question whether the ossified membrane should be excised or not excised in these cases is a matter of controversy. They think that an ossified membrane causing an armored brain appearance should be excised in symptomatic, young patients with prominent cerebral compression. During this dissection, the relatively thickened arachnoid mater provides a safe border 13).


A 67-year-old man presented with headache, dysphasia, and left-sided hemiparesis. Routine skull x-ray showed a huge calcification extending from the frontal to the parietal regions in the right side. CT and MRI scan revealed a huge ossified SDH covering the right hemisphere. Right frontoparietal craniotomy was performed and the ossified SDH was completely removed. Severe adhesion was noticed between the pia mater and the inner surface of the ossified mass. The subdural mass had ossified hard outer and inner rims and a soft central part. The postoperative course was uneventful and 3 months after the operation, the patient was neurologically intact. The authors report the successful treatment of a patient with a huge ossified SDH covering the right hemisphere. Careful dissection and total removal are needed in such symptomatic cases to avoid cortical injury and to improve results 14).


A 24-year-old man with a history of tonic-clonic convulsions since 7 months of age was admitted because of increasing frequency and duration of seizures. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a fusiform extra-axial lesion just above the tentorium and adjacent to the cerebral falx. A calcified and ossified chronic subdural hematoma was noted and was almost completely removed by craniotomy. Better seizure control was achieved by the removal of the calcified chronic subdural hematoma. Calcified subdural hematoma, calcified epidural hematoma, calcified empyema, meningioma, calcified arachnoid cyst, and calcified convexity of the dura mater with acute epidural hematoma should be considered for the differential diagnosis of an extra-axial calcified lesion 15).


Turgut et al. reported the successful removal of an ossified crust-like chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) covering the hemisphere in a 16-year-old boy. In this article, the importance of the surgical approach is stressed, and the rarity of this condition in the neurosurgical literature is also outlined 16).


A case of ossified chronic subdural hematoma is presented in a 13-year-old male in whom the mass was surgically removed. His neurological deficits continued afterward but were less severe 17).

References

1) , 2) , 4)

Turgut M, Akhaddar A, Turgut AT. Calcified or Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Systematic Review of 114 Cases Reported during Last Century with a Demonstrative Case Report. World Neurosurg. 2019 Nov 1. pii: S1878-8750(19)32791-3. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.10.153. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PubMed PMID: 31682989.
3) , 15)

Yan HJ, Lin KE, Lee ST, Tzaan WC. Calcified chronic subdural hematoma: case report. Changgeng Yi Xue Za Zhi. 1998 Dec;21(4):521-5. PubMed PMID: 10074745.
5)

Turgut M, Yay MÖ. A Rare Case of Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma Complicated with Tension Pneumocephalus. J Neurol Surg Rep. 2019 Oct;80(4):e44-e45. doi: 10.1055/s-0039-1694738. Epub 2019 Dec 31. PubMed PMID: 31908905; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6938459.
6)

Liu X, Zhou J, Shen B, Sun D, Zhang Z, Li H, Zhang J. Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma and Subsequent Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Case Report and Literature Review. World Neurosurg. 2019 Oct;130:165-169. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.07.011. Epub 2019 Jul 9. PubMed PMID: 31299306.
7)

Snopko P, Kolarovszki B, Opsenak R, Hanko M, Benco M. Chronic calcified subdural hematoma – case report of a rare diagnosis. Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub. 2019 Sep 26. doi: 10.5507/bp.2019.041. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31558846.
8)

Tian W, Meng X, Zou J. A Giant Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2019 Sep;29(9):905. doi: 10.29271/jcpsp.2019.09.905. PubMed PMID: 31455496.
9)

Fang J, Liu Y, Jiang X. Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Children: Case Report and Review of Literature. World Neurosurg. 2019 Jun;126:613-615. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.03.144. Epub 2019 Mar 27. PubMed PMID: 30926556.
10)

Siddiqui SA, Singh PK, Sawarkar D, Singh M, Sharma BS. Bilateral Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting as Diabetes Insipidus-Case Report and Literature Review. World Neurosurg. 2017 Feb;98:520-524. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2016.11.031. Epub 2016 Nov 17. Review. PubMed PMID: 27867130.
11)

Viozzi I, van Baarsen K, Grotenhuis A. Armored brain in a young girl with a syndromal hydrocephalus. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2017 Jan;159(1):81-83. doi: 10.1007/s00701-016-2991-1. Epub 2016 Oct 25. PubMed PMID: 27778104; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5177664.
12)

Turgut M, Samancoğlu H, Ozsunar Y, Erkuş M. Ossified chronic subdural hematoma. Cent Eur Neurosurg. 2010 Aug;71(3):146-8. doi: 10.1055/s-0030-1253346. Epub 2010 May 3. PubMed PMID: 20440672.
13)

Kaplan M, Akgün B, Seçer HI. Ossified chronic subdural hematoma with armored brain. Turk Neurosurg. 2008 Oct;18(4):420-4. PubMed PMID: 19107693.
14)

Moon HG, Shin HS, Kim TH, Hwang YS, Park SK. Ossified chronic subdural hematoma. Yonsei Med J. 2003 Oct 30;44(5):915-8. PubMed PMID: 14584111.
16)

Turgut M, Palaoğlu S, Sağlam S. Huge ossified crust-like subdural hematoma covering the hemisphere and causing acute signs of increased intracranial pressure. Childs Nerv Syst. 1997 Jul;13(7):415-7. PubMed PMID: 9298279.
17)

Iplikçioğlu AC, Akkaş O, Sungur R. Ossified chronic subdural hematoma: case report. J Trauma. 1991 Feb;31(2):272-5. PubMed PMID: 1994092.
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