Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Risk Factors

Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Risk Factors

Age, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes mellitus, cerebral atherosclerosis, aneurysms located at the internal carotid artery (ICA) and aneurysm neck width (N) correlated negatively with rupture risk. Aneurysms located at the anterior communicating artery, bifurcation, irregularity, with a daughter sac, aneurysm height, maximum size, aspect ratio (AR), height-to-width ratio and bottleneck factor were significantly and positively correlated with rupture risk 1).

The anterior communicating artery (AcomA) junction is the most common location for cerebral aneurysms. This might because of increased vascular wall shear stress due to the complex structure of the junction. The aim of a study of İdil Soylu et al. was to investigate the effect of morphological parameters in the development of anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. A retrospective analysis of the hospital database was performed to identify patients with AcomA aneurysms. Patients with normal computed tomography angiography (CTA) examinations were enrolled in the study as the control group. The control group was similar to the patient group in gender and age. Morphological parameters (vessel diameters, vessel diameter ratios, and vessel angles) on the same side (ipsilateral) and on the opposite side (contralateral) of the patients with aneurysm, and morphological parameters of the control group were compared. A total of 171 subjects were involved in the study (86 patients with aneurysms and 85 patients in the control group). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the ipsilateral A1-A2 angle (OR: 0.932; 95% CI: 0.903-0.961; p < 0.001), the ipsilateral A1/A2 vessel diameter ratio (OR: 27.725; 95% CI: 1.715-448.139; p = 0.019), and the contralateral internal carotid artery (ICA)/A1 ratio (OR: 11.817; 95% CI: 2.617-53.355; p = 0.001) were significant morphological predictors for developing an aneurysm. An increased contralateral ICA/A1 ratio, an increased ipsilateral A1/A2 vessel diameter ratio, and a narrow bifurcation angle are significant predictors for developing an aneurysm. Therefore, in patients with clinical risk factors these parameters may be interpreted as additional morphological risk factors for developing an aneurysm 2).


An asymmetry of the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery is an assumed risk factor for the development of anterior communicating artery aneurysms (ACoAAs).

In clinic, it’s very common to find out the unequal development of section A1 of anteromedial brain artery. The resulting hemodynamic changes are considered to be one of the main reasons for the formation of anterior communicating artery aneurysms 3).

An asymmetry of the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery (A1SA) was identified on digital subtraction angiography studies from 127 patients (21.4%) and was strongly associated with ACoAA (p < 0.0001, OR 13.7). An A1SA independently correlated with the occurrence of ACA infarction in patients with ACoAA (p = 0.047) and in those without an ACoAA (p = 0.015). Among patients undergoing ACoAA coiling, A1SA was independently associated with the severity of ACA infarction (p = 0.023) and unfavorable functional outcome (p = 0.045, OR = 2.4).

An A1SA is a common anatomical variation in SAH patients and is strongly associated with ACoAA. Moreover, the presence of A1SA independently increases the likelihood of ACA infarction. In SAH patients undergoing ACoAA coiling, A1SA carries the risk for severe ACA infarction and thus an unfavorable outcome. Clinical trial registration no.: DRKS00005486 (http://www.drks.de/) 4).


Findings in a study of Matsukawa et al. demonstrated that the anterior projection of an ACoA aneurysm may be related to rupturing. The authors would perhaps recommend treatment to patients with unruptured ACoA aneurysms that have an anterior dome projection, a bleb(s), and a size ≥ 5 mm 5)

References

1)

Wang GX, Zhang D, Wang ZP, Yang LQ, Yang H, Li W. Risk factors for ruptured intracranial aneurysms. Indian J Med Res. 2018 Jan;147(1):51-57. doi: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1665_15. PubMed PMID: 29749361; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5967217.
2)

İdil Soylu A, Ozturk M, Akan H. Can vessel diameters, diameter ratios, and vessel angles predict the development of anterior communicating artery aneurysms: A morphological analysis. J Clin Neurosci. 2019 Jul 26. pii: S0967-5868(19)30755-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2019.07.024. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31358430.
3)

Okamoto S, Itoh A. Craniotomy side for neck clipping of the anterior communicating aneurysm via the pterional approach. No Shinkei Geka. 2002;30:285–291.
4)

Jabbarli R, Reinhard M, Roelz R, Kaier K, Weyerbrock A, Taschner C, Scheiwe C, Shah M. Clinical relevance of anterior cerebral artery asymmetry in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. J Neurosurg. 2017 Nov;127(5):1070-1076. doi: 10.3171/2016.9.JNS161706. Epub 2016 Dec 23. PubMed PMID: 28009232.
5)

Matsukawa H, Uemura A, Fujii M, Kamo M, Takahashi O, Sumiyoshi S. Morphological and clinical risk factors for the rupture of anterior communicating artery aneurysms. J Neurosurg. 2013 May;118(5):978-83. doi: 10.3171/2012.11.JNS121210. Epub 2012 Dec 14. PubMed PMID: 23240701.

Anterior temporal lobectomy complications

Anterior temporal lobectomy complications

Even though the mortality after Anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) is minimal, the overall morbidity cannot be ignored. Psychiatric disturbances, visual field defects, and cognitive disorders are the most common postoperative complications, and should be considered during the preoperative planning and consultation 1).

Visual field defects

ATL is often complicated by quadrantanopia. In some cases this can be severe enough to prohibit driving, even if a patient is free of seizures. These deficits are caused by damage to Meyers loop of the optic radiation, which shows considerable heterogeneity in its anterior extent. This structure cannot be distinguished using clinical magnetic resonance imaging sequences.

Optic radiation tractography by DTI could be a useful method to assess an individual patient’s risk of postoperative visual deficit 2)3).

van Lanen et al., developed a score method for the assessment of postoperative visual field defects after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery and assessed its feasibility for clinical use. A significant correlation between VFD and resection size for right-sided ATL was confirmed 4).

Cranial nerve (CN) deficits following anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) are an uncommon but well-recognized complication. The usual CNs implicated in post-ATL complications include the oculomotor nervetrochlear nerve, and facial nerves.

Injury to the trigeminal nerve leading to neuropathic pain are described in 2 cases following temporal lobe resections for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. The possible pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed and the microsurgical anatomy of surgically relevant structures is reviewed. 5).

Case reports

Dickerson et al., from the Department of Neurosurgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, JacksonUSA report the third known case and first of diffuse vasospasm. A 48-year-old woman underwent a transcortical anterior left temporal lobectomy. Eleven days later, she had new-onset expressive aphasia with narrowing of the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral arteries, and increased velocities via transcranial Doppler. She was treated with fluids, nimodipine, and permissive hypertension. At 6 months, her speech was near baseline. Cerebral vasospasm may represent a rare cause of morbidity after anterior temporal lobectomy; a literature review on the subject is presented 6).

References

1)

Brotis AG, Giannis T, Kapsalaki E, Dardiotis E, Fountas KN. Complications after Anterior Temporal Lobectomy for Medically Intractable Epilepsy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. 2019 Jul 9:1-14. doi: 10.1159/000500136. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PubMed PMID: 31288240.
2)

Borius PY, Roux FE, Valton L, Sol JC, Lotterie JA, Berry I. Can DTI fiber tracking of the optic radiations predict visual deficit after surgery? Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2014 Jul;122:87-91. doi: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2014.04.017. Epub 2014 May 5. PubMed PMID: 24908224.
3)

James JS, Radhakrishnan A, Thomas B, Madhusoodanan M, Kesavadas C, Abraham M, Menon R, Rathore C, Vilanilam G. Diffusion tensor imaging tractography of Meyer’s loop in planning resective surgery for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Epilepsy Res. 2015 Feb;110:95-104. doi: 10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2014.11.020. Epub 2014 Nov 27. PubMed PMID: 25616461.
4)

van Lanen RHGJ, Hoeberigs MC, Bauer NJC, Haeren RHL, Hoogland G, Colon A, Piersma C, Dings JTA, Schijns OEMG. Visual field deficits after epilepsy surgery: a new quantitative scoring method. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2018 Jul;160(7):1325-1336. doi: 10.1007/s00701-018-3525-9. Epub 2018 Apr 5. PubMed PMID: 29623432; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5995984.
5)

Gill I, Parrent AG, Steven DA. Trigeminal neuropathic pain as a complication of anterior temporal lobectomy: report of 2 cases. J Neurosurg. 2016 Apr;124(4):962-5. doi: 10.3171/2015.5.JNS15123. Epub 2015 Oct 30. PubMed PMID: 26517768.
6)

Dickerson JC, Hidalgo JA, Smalley ZS, Shiflett JM. Diffuse vasospasm after transcortical temporal lobectomy for intractable epilepsy. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2018 Jul 10. doi: 10.1007/s00701-018-3606-9. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 29987392.

Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

Although Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring has been shown to decrease the risk of neurological injury in deformity surgery, its utility in anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS) remains controversial 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6)7) 8).

Proponents of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring for ACSS claim that it improves patient safety and functional outcome whereas opponents refute this claim by citing increased cost and the lack of correlation between intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring abnormalities and postoperative neurological deficits especially with anterior cervical discectomy and fusions (ACDFs) 9) 10) 11) 12).


In a systematic review and meta-analysis from 2017, the risk of neurological injury after ACSS was low although procedures involving a corpectomy may carry a higher risk. For ACDFs, there is no difference in the risk of neurological injury with or without ION use. Unimodal ION has a higher specificity than multimodal ION and may minimize “subclinical” intraoperative alerts in ACSS 13)


A analysis of over 140,000 cases from the National Inpatient Sample data set, found that the use of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoringfor anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was not associated with a reduced rate of neurological complication14).

References

1)

Dawson EG, Sherman JE, Kanim LE, et al. Spinal cord monitoring. Results of the Scoliosis Research Society and the European Spinal Deformity Society survey. Spine. 1991;16:S361–4.
2)

Diab M, Smith AR, Kuklo TR. Neural complications in the surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Spine. 2007;32:2759–63.
3)

Eggspuehler A, Sutter MA, Grob D, et al. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring during surgery of spinal deformities in 217 patients. Eur Spine J. 2007;16:S188–96.
4)

Forbes HJ, Allen PW, Waller CS, et al. Spinal cord monitoring in scoliosis surgery. Experience with 1168 cases. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1991;73:487–91.
5)

Kamerlink JR, Errico T, Xavier S, et al. Major intraoperative neurologic monitoring deficits in consecutive pediatric and adult spinal deformity patients at one institution. Spine. 2010;35:240–5.
6)

Nuwer MR, Emerson RG, Galloway G, et al. Evidence-based guideline update: intraoperative spinal monitoring with somato-sensory and transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials*. J Clin Neurophysiol. 2012;29:101–8.
7)

Resnick DK, Choudhri TF, Dailey AT, et al. Guidelines for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 15: electrophysiological monitoring and lumbar fusion. J Neurosurg Spine. 2005;2:725–32.
8)

Zhuang Q, Wang S, Zhang J, et al. How to make the best use of intraoperative motor evoked potential monitoring? Experience in 1162 consecutive spinal deformity surgical procedures. Spine. 2014;39:E1425–32.
9)

Engler GL, Spielholz NJ, Bernhard WN, et al. Somatosensory evoked potentials during Harrington instrumentation for scoliosis. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1978;60:528–32.
10)

Epstein NE, Danto J, Nardi D. Evaluation of intraoperative somatosensory-evoked potential monitoring during 100 cervical operations. Spine. 1993;18:737–47.
11)

Taunt CJ, Jr, Sidhu KS, Andrew SA. Somatosensory evoked potential monitoring during anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Spine. 2005;30:1970–2.
12)

Traynelis VC, Abode-Iyamah KO, Leick KM, et al. Cervical decompression and reconstruction without intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. J Neurosurg Spine. 2012;16:107–13.
13)

Ajiboye RM, Zoller SD, Sharma A, Mosich GM, Drysch A, Li J, Reza T, Pourtaheri S. Intraoperative Neuromonitoring for Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: What Is the Evidence? Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2017 Mar 15;42(6):385-393. doi: 10.1097/BRS.0000000000001767. Review. PubMed PMID: 27390917; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5552368.
14)

Badhiwala JH, Nassiri F, Witiw CD, Mansouri A, Almenawer SA, da Costa L, Fehlings MG, Wilson JR. Investigating the utility of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: analysis of over 140,000 cases from the National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample data set. J Neurosurg Spine. 2019 Mar 29:1-11. doi: 10.3171/2019.1.SPINE181110. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30925481.
WhatsApp WhatsApp us
%d bloggers like this: