Vestibular Schwannoma Gamma Knife radiosurgery complications

Vestibular Schwannoma Gamma Knife radiosurgery complications

Patients treated with Stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma can have a similar complication profile to those treated with intracranial surgery. Vestibular Schwannoma Meta-analysis from early experience showed that 44% with serviceable hearing prior to treatment retained their ability after SRS, a statistically equivalent rate to the surgical data. This evidence also suggest that 37.9% of patients have other complications 1).


In the mid-1970s, early facial weakness occurred in 38% and facial numbness in 33%. This has gradually decreased to less than 2% in the 1990s. Preservation of hearing (unchanged or almost unchanged) is currently achieved in 65 to 70%. Tinnitus is rarely changed by the treatment. The risks of intracranial bleeding, infection, and CSF leak are avoided because of the non-invasive nature of the treatment. Hydrocephalus directly induced by the tumor occurred in 9.2% of patients. On the other hand, a treatment%related peritumoral reaction sufficient to block the CSF circulation and require shunt insertion was seen in only 1.4%. Based on experiences worldwide, the incidence of secondary neoplasia seems to be 0.1%. The effectiveness of GKR together with its low complication rate makes it a suitable treatment for anyone, regardless of age and general health 2).


Malignant transformation is possible 3). , and long-term post-SRS surveillance MRI is important 4).

Patients receiving > 13 Gy were significantly more likely to develop trigeminal neuropathy than those receiving < 13 Gy (p < 0.001) 5).

Pollack et al. described an acute facial and acoustic neuropathy following gamma knife surgery (GKS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS). This 39-year-old woman presenting with tinnitus underwent GKS for a small right-sided intracanalicular VS, receiving a maximal dose of 26 Gy and a tumor margin dose of 13 Gy to the 50% isodose line. Thirty-six hours following treatment she presented with nausea, vomiting, vertigo, diminished hearing, and a House-Brackmann Grade III facial palsy. She was started on intravenous glucocorticosteroid agents, and over the course of 2 weeks her facial function returned to House-Brackmann Grade I. Unfortunately, her hearing loss persisted. A magnetic resonance (MR) image obtained at the time of initial deterioration demonstrated a significant decrease in tumor enhancement but no change in tumor size or peritumoral edema. Subsequently, the patient experienced severe hemifacial spasms, which persisted for a period of 3 weeks and then progressed to a House-Brackmann Grade V facial palsy. During the next 3 months, the patient was treated with steroids and in time her facial function and hearing returned to baseline levels. Results of MR imaging revealed transient enlargement (3 mm) of the tumor, which subsequently returned to its baseline size. This change corresponded to the tumor volume increase from 270 to 336 mm3. The patient remains radiologically and neurologically stable at 10 months posttreatment. This is the first detailed report of acute facial and vestibulocochlear neurotoxicity following GKS for VS that improved with time. In addition, MR imaging findings were indicative of early neurotoxic changes. A review of possible risk factors and explanations of causative mechanisms is provided 6).

see Vestibular Schwannoma pseudoprogression.


1)

Kaylie DM, Horgan MJ, Delashaw JB, McMenomey SO. A meta-analysis comparing outcomes of microsurgery and gamma knife radiosurgery. Laryngoscope. 2000 Nov;110(11):1850-6. doi: 10.1097/00005537-200011000-00016. PMID: 11081598.
2)

Norén G. Long-term complications following gamma knife radiosurgery of vestibular schwannomas. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. 1998 Oct;70 Suppl 1:65-73. doi: 10.1159/000056408. PMID: 9782237.
3)

Yanamadala V, Williamson RW, Fusco DJ, Eschbacher J, Weisskopf P, Porter RW. Malignant transformation of a vestibular schwannoma after gamma knife radiosurgery. World Neurosurg. 2013 Mar-Apr;79(3-4):593.e1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2012.03.016. Epub 2012 Apr 2. PubMed PMID: 22480982.
4)

Kawashima M, Hasegawa H, Shin M, Shinya Y, Katano A, Saito N. Outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery in young adults with vestibular schwannomas. J Neurooncol. 2021 Jul 9. doi: 10.1007/s11060-021-03803-w. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34241770.
5)

Sughrue ME, Yang I, Han SJ, Aranda D, Kane AJ, Amoils M, Smith ZA, Parsa AT. Non-audiofacial morbidity after Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma. J Neurosurg. 2013 Dec;119 Suppl:E4. Review. PubMed PMID: 25077327.
6)

Pollack AG, Marymont MH, Kalapurakal JA, Kepka A, Sathiaseelan V, Chandler JP. Acute neurological complications following gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannoma. Case report. J Neurosurg. 2005 Sep;103(3):546-51. doi: 10.3171/jns.2005.103.3.0546. PMID: 16235688.

Ventriculoperitoneal shunt abdominal complications

Ventriculoperitoneal shunt abdominal complications

Abdominal complications include peritonitisascites, bowel and abdominal wall perforation, and inguinal hernias.

Abdominal complications are reported in 5–47 % of ventriculoperitoneal shunt cases 1) 2).

Ascites

Abdominal pseudocyst

Bowel perforation

Hydrocele

Shunt extrusion

Shunt migration

CSF leaks

Viscous perforations

Protrusion of the catheter from the anus

Spontaneous knotting of the peritoneal catheter is a rare complication of the VP shunt 3).

Peritoneal catheter knot formation

Liver abscess

Pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan is most commonly due to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in diabetic patients, and less frequently due to biliary tract infections. Liver abscess caused by ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is very rare. We report a case of liver abscess caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which developed as a complication of an infected VP shunt. A 53-year-old woman, who had shad a VP shunt implanted 3 months previously for hydrocephalus due to intracranial hemorrhage, presented with fever off and on, drowsiness and seizure attacks for 1 week. Computed tomography (CT) of the brain showed only mild right-sided hydrocephalus, and was negative for intracranial hemorrhage and intracranial mass. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid showed significant pleocytosis and hypoglycorrhachia. CT scan of the abdomen disclosed a huge abscess in the right lobe of the liver. Cultures of both the cerebrospinal fluid and aspirated liver abscess isolated MRSA. The patient was treated with intraventricular and intravenous vancomycin, intravenous teicoplanin and oral rifampicin, followed by oral chloramphenicol and rifampicin. Percutaneous drainage of the liver abscess and externalization of the VP shunt were performed. The liver abscess had resolved almost completely on ultrasonography after 2 weeks of therapy. Liver abscess in patients with a VP shunt should be considered a possible abdominal complication of the VP shunt, and may be caused by unusual pathogens. Diagnosis requires CT scan and direct aspiration and culture of the liver abscess. Treatment requires management of both the liver abscess and the infected shunt 4).

Liver pseudocyst

The formation of a liver pseudocyst is a rare occurrence, and its mechanisms are still largely unknown.

Mallereau et al. reported the case of a 69-year-old woman with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, inserted for the management of hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, presenting to the Accident and Emergency for acute cholecystitis. Besides confirming the diagnosis, an ultrasound investigation revealed the presence of a hepatic cyst. Conservative treatment with antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was performed with favorable outcomes and resorption of the cyst. Interestingly the patient kept on presenting several similar episodes managed well by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs alone, each of them associated with transient symptoms and signs of ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction. Computerized Tomography brain and lumbar puncture were normal, whereas the CT abdomen showed the ventriculoperitoneal shunt distal catheter passing through the hepatic cyst. Given the ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction, in the context of an infective/inflammatory process, a conversion of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt into a ventriculoatrial shunt was carried out with a successful clinical outcome.

Based on current literature they propose a clinical and radiological classification of such pseudocysts related to ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Clinical presentation, diagnostic findings, and management options are proposed for each type: purely infective, spurious (infective/inflammatory), and purely inflammatory. In the absence of system infection, a simple replacement of the distal catheter seems to be the best solution 5).

References

1)

Chung J, Yu J, Joo HK, Se JN, Kim M. Intraabdominal complications secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunts: CT findings and review of the literature. American Journal of Roentgenology. 2009;193(5):1311–1317.
2)

Murtagh FR, Quencer RM, Poole CA. Extracranial complications of cerebrospinal fluid shunt function in childhood hydrocephalus. American Journal of Roentgenology. 1980;135(4):763–766.
3)

Borcek AO, Civi S, Golen M, Emmez H, Baykaner MK. An unusual ventriculoperitoneal shunt complication: spontaneous knot formation. Turkish Neurosurgery. 2012;22(2):261–264.
4)

Shen MC, Lee SS, Chen YS, Yen MY, Liu YC. Liver abscess caused by an infected ventriculoperitoneal shunt. J Formos Med Assoc. 2003 Feb;102(2):113-6. PubMed PMID: 12709741.
5)

Mallereau CH, Ganau M, Todeschi J, Addeo PF, Moliere S, Chibbaro S. Relapsing-Remitting Hepatic Pseudo-Cyst: a great simulator of malfunctioning ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Case report and proposal of a new classification. Neurochirurgie. 2020 Oct 10:S0028-3770(20)30399-4. doi: 10.1016/j.neuchi.2020.08.001. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33049283.

Chronic subdural hematoma surgery complications

Chronic subdural hematoma surgery complications

The most frequent complication after chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is chronic subdural hematoma recurrence requiring reoperation. Although several definitions of recurrence have been proposed 1) one of the most consensual definitions of recurrence is the association between new clinical symptoms and hematoma revealed by CT scans. Thus, one can wonder whether a systematic CT scan is necessary after CSDH evacuation for a patient without symptoms.

Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalusintracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction.

Failure of the brain to re-expand, pneumocephalus, incomplete evacuation, and recurrence of the fluid collection are the most frequently.

Recurrence

see Chronic subdural hematoma recurrence.

Seizures

Seizures (including intractable status epilepticus).

Intracerebral hemorrhage

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH): occurs in 0.7–5%. Very devastating in this setting: one–third of these patients die and one third are severely disabled

Brain herniation

Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with brain herniation signs is rarely seen in the emergent department. As such, there are few cumulative data to analyze such cases.

Failure of postoperative cerebral reexpansion

A wide variation in postoperative drainage volumes is observed during treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with twist-drill or burr-hole craniostomy and closed-system drainage.

The postoperative drainage volumes varied greatly because of differences in the outer membrane permeability of CSDH, and such variation seems to be related to the findings on the CT scans obtained preoperatively. Patients with CSDH in whom there is less postoperative drainage than expected should be carefully observed, with special attention paid to the possibility of recurrence 2).

Patients with high subdural pressure showed the most rapid brain expansion and clinical improvement during the first 2 days. Nevertheless, a computerized tomography (CT) scan performed on the 10th day after surgery demonstrated persisting subdural fluid in 78% of cases. After 40 days, the CT scan was normal in 27 of the 32 patients. There was no mortality and no significant morbidity. A study suggests that well developed subdural neomembranes are the crucial factors for cerebral reexpansion, a phenomenon that takes at least 10 to 20 days. However, blood vessel dysfunction and impairment of cerebral blood flow may participate in delay of brain reexpansion. It may be argued that additional surgical procedures, such as repeated tapping of the subdural fluid, craniotomy, and membranectomy or even craniectomy, should not be evaluated earlier than 20 days after the initial surgical procedure unless the patient has deteriorated markedly 3).

Postoperative pneumocephalus

see Tension pneumocephalus after chronic subdural hematoma evacuation.

Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH)

see Remote cerebellar hemorrhage.

Epidural hematoma

After chronic subdural hematoma evacuation surgery, the development of epidural hematoma is a very rare entity.

Akpinar et al. report the case of a 41-year-old man with an epidural hematoma complication after chronic subdural hematoma evacuation. Under general anesthesia, the patient underwent a large craniotomy with closed system drainage performed to treat the chronic subdural hematoma. After chronic subdural hematoma evacuation, there was epidural leakage on the following day.

Although trauma is the most common risk factor in young CSDH patients, some other predisposing factors may exist. Intracranial hypotension can cause EDH. Craniotomy and drainage surgery can usually resolve the problem. Because of rapid dynamic intracranial changes, epidural leakages can occur. A large craniotomy flap and silicone drainage in the operation area are key safety points for neurosurgeons and hydration is essential 4).

Intracranial subdural empyema

A case of intracranial subdural empyema following chronic subdural hematoma drainage 5).

Skin depression

see Skin depression after chronic subdural hematoma surgery.

Oculomotor nerve palsy

see Oculomotor nerve palsy in chronic subdural hematoma.

Pseudohypoxic brain swelling

Pseudohypoxic brain swelling (PHBS) is a rare and potentially fatal complication that may occur in patients following uneventful brain surgery. Fan presented a case of PHBS after chronic subdural hematoma surgery that developed after drilling and drainage. Neuroimaging findings, pathogenic factors, and therapy are also discussed 6).

References

1)

A. Chiari, K. Hocking, E. Broughton, C. Turner, T. Santarius, P. Hutchinson, A. Kolias, Core outcomes and common data elements in chronic subdural hematoma: a systematic review of the literature focused on reported outcomes, J.Neurotrauma 33 (2016) 1212–1219, https://doi.org/10.1089/neu.2015.3983.
2)

Kwon TH, Park YK, Lim DJ, Cho TH, Chung YG, Chung HS, Suh JK. Chronic subdural hematoma: evaluation of the clinical significance of postoperative drainage volume. J Neurosurg. 2000 Nov;93(5):796-9. PubMed PMID: 11059660.
3)

Markwalder TM, Steinsiepe KF, Rohner M, Reichenbach W, Markwalder H. The course of chronic subdural hematomas after burr-hole craniostomy and closed-system drainage. J Neurosurg. 1981 Sep;55(3):390-6. PubMed PMID: 7264730.
4)

Akpinar A, Ucler N, Erdogan U, Yucetas CS. Epidural Hematoma Complication after Rapid Chronic Subdural Hematoma Evacuation: A Case Report. Am J Case Rep. 2015 Jul 6;16:430-433. PubMed PMID: 26147957.
5)

Ovalioglu AO, Aydin OA. A case of subdural empyema following chronic subdural hematoma drainage. Neurol India. 2013 Mar-Apr;61(2):207-9. doi: 10.4103/0028-3886.111165. PubMed PMID: 23644343.
6)

Fan Q. Pseudohypoxic Brain Swelling after Drilling and Drainage for Chronic Subdural Hematoma. J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg. 2020 Oct 13. doi: 10.1055/s-0040-1712500. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33049793.
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