Craniosynostosis diagnosis

Craniosynostosis diagnosis

Commonly, craniosynostosis is present at birth, but it is not always diagnosed when mild. Usually it is diagnosed as a cranial deformity in the first few months of life. The diagnosis relies on physical examination and radiographic studies, including plain radiography and computed tomography (CT). Clinical history should include complications of pregnancy, duration of gestation, and birth weight 1).

Premature fusion of the cranial sutures restricts cranial growth perpendicular to the affected suture with compensatory overgrowth along the other patent sutures. This results in the characteristic skull shape deformities noted in craniosynostosis. Diagnostic imaging is necessary to confirm the fused suture and to assess the accompanying skull deformities, intracranial pathology and other complications. A prematurely fused suture shows perisutural sclerosis, linearity, reduced serration, bony bridging or the absence of the suture on a plain skull radiography or CT image. Secondary signs of increased ICP, such as a “copper-beaten” appearance, are also observed in severe cases 2).

Soboleski et al. 3) reported the ultrasonographic findings of craniosynostosis as follows : 1) the loss of the hypoechoic fibrous gap between hyperechoic body plates; 2) an irregular, thickened inner sutural margin; 3) the loss of a beveled edge; and 4) asymmetric fontanels. On “Black Bone” MRI, the affected fused sutures are demonstrated as absence of suture 4).


A normal patent suture is demonstrated as a radiolucency, serrated and nonlinear line on plain skull radiography and 3D-CT images 5) 6) 7) 8).

Ultrasonography shows a normal patent suture as an uninterrupted hypoechoic fibrous gap between hyperechoic cranial bones with an end-to-end appearance on a transverse scan of the sagittal sinus and a beveled appearance on a transverse scan of the coronal and lambdoid suture9) 10) 11)


Conventional MRI has typically been unreliable in identifying sutures individually. However, Eley et al. described a novel gradient echo MRI sequence (“Black Bone”) that minimizes soft tissue contrast to enhance the bone-soft tissue boundaries and can demonstrate normal patent cranial sutures as hyperintensity distinguished from the signal void of the cranial bones 12).


Proisy et al. from Rennes first described a high-resolution sonography technique and its limitations. They then analyzed the reliabilityeffectiveness and role of ultrasonography in routine practice using a PubMed literature review.

Ten studies reported excellent correlations between ultrasonography and 3D-CT. Cranial US for the diagnosis of a closed suture had 100% sensitivity in 8 studies and 86-100% specificity before the age of 12 months. Negative findings mean imaging investigation can be stopped. If ultrasonography confirms diagnosis, neurosurgical consultation is required. Thus, 3D-CT can be postponed until appropriate before surgery.

Cranial suture ultrasound is an effective and reliable technique for the diagnosis of craniosynostosis. It has many advantages: it is fast and non-irradiating, and no sedation is required. It should be used as first-line imaging in infants below the age of 8-12 months when craniosynostosis is clinically suspected. 13).

References

1)

Panchal J, Uttchin V. Management of craniosynostosis. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2003;111:2032–48.
2)

Kim HJ, Roh HG, Lee IW. Craniosynostosis : Updates in Radiologic Diagnosis. J Korean Neurosurg Soc. 2016 May;59(3):219-26. doi: 10.3340/jkns.2016.59.3.219. Epub 2016 May 10. Review. PubMed PMID: 27226852; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4877543.
3) , 11)

Soboleski D, Mussari B, McCloskey D, Sauerbrei E, Espinosa F, Fletcher A. High-resolution sonography of the abnormal cranial suture. Pediatr Radiol. 1998;28:79–82.
4) , 12)

Eley KA, Watt-Smith SR, Sheerin F, Golding SJ. “Black Bone” MRI : a potential alternative to CT with three-dimensional reconstruction of the craniofacial skeleton in the diagnosis of craniosynostosis. Eur Radiol. 2014;24:2417–2426.
5)

Badve CA, K MM, Iyer RS, Ishak GE, Khanna PC. Craniosynostosis : imaging review and primer on computed tomography. Pediatr Radiol. 2013;43:728–742. quiz 725-727.
6)

Branson HM, Shroff MM. Craniosynostosis and 3-dimensional computed tomography. Semin Ultrasound CT MR. 2011;32:569–577.
7)

Kirmi O, Lo SJ, Johnson D, Anslow P. Craniosynostosis : a radiological and surgical perspective. Semin Ultrasound CT MR. 2009;30:492–512.
8)

Nagaraja S, Anslow P, Winter B. Craniosynostosis. Clin Radiol. 2013;68:284–292.
9)

Regelsberger J, Delling G, Helmke K, Tsokos M, Kammler G, Kränzlein H, et al. Ultrasound in the diagnosis of craniosynostosis. J Craniofac Surg. 2006;17:623–625. discussion 626-628.
10)

Soboleski D, McCloskey D, Mussari B, Sauerbrei E, Clarke M, Fletcher A. Sonography of normal cranial sutures. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1997;168:819–821.
13)

Proisy M, Bruneau B, Riffaud L. How ultrasonography can contribute diagnosis of craniosynostosis. Neurochirurgie. 2019 Oct 2. pii: S0028-3770(19)30231-0. doi: 10.1016/j.neuchi.2019.09.019. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31586456.

Intracerebral hemorrhage diagnosis

Intracerebral hemorrhage diagnosis

Computed tomography

Noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) is the gold standard to detect intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in patients presenting with acute focal syndromes.

Although CT remains important in the acute setting, MR imaging has proved invaluable for diagnosis and characterization of intracranial hemorrhage.

Non-contrast head CT, given its availability and high sensitivity in detecting blood products, is frequently the first tool to readily detect ICH; however, different types of hemorrhages may share a common appearance on CT and the optimal therapeutic approach varies depending on etiology. An additional diagnostic work-up is frequently indicated to make the final diagnosis and to assist in urgent patient management. CT- and MR angiography, and digital angiography can diagnose vascular anomalies, CT venography can reveal cerebral vein thrombosis, diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) may show hemorrhagic transformation of an infarct, and susceptibility-weighted MRI (SWI) may detect hypertensive and amyloid angiopathy-related microbleeds. MR also has a major role in revealing underlying etiologies such as cavernoma, primary brain tumor or metastases. These imaging tools assist in determining the cause of ICH, and also in assessing the risk of deterioration. Prognostic factors such as size, location, mass effect, and detection of the “spot sign” all play an important role in foreseeing possible deterioration, thus allowing prompt intervention 1).


Intracerebral hemorrhage volume is a powerful predictor of 30-day mortality after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Kothari et al., compared a bedside method of measuring CT ICH volume with measurements made by computer-assisted planimetric image analysis 2).

MRI

Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) may be considered as the initial screening tool for imaging patients presenting with focal neurologic symptoms suggestive of stroke.

DW-MRI at b1000 has a diagnostic yield similar to noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) for detecting ICH and superior to NCCT for detecting ischemic stroke (IS). Therefore, DW-MRI may be considered as the initial screening tool for imaging patients presenting with focal neurologic symptoms suggestive of stroke 3).

Biomarkers

Results indicated that circulating miR-181b, miR-223, miR-155 and miR-145 in plasma samples could be served as a potential noninvasive tool in ICH detection 4).

References

1)

Eliahou R, Auriel E, Gomori M, Sosna J, Honig A. [SPONTANEOUS PARENCHYMAL INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGE – A DIAGNOSTIC CHALLENGE]. Harefuah. 2018 Mar;157(3):158-161. Hebrew. PubMed PMID: 29582945.
2)

((Kothari RU, Brott T, Broderick JP, Barsan WG, Sauerbeck LR, Zuccarello M, Khoury J. The ABCs of measuring intracerebral hemorrhage volumes. Stroke. 1996 Aug;27(8):1304-5. PubMed PMID: 8711791.
3)

Keigler G, Goldberg I, Eichel R, Gomori JM, Cohen JE, Leker RR. Diffusion-weighted Imaging at b1000 for Identifying Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Preliminary Sensitivity, Specificity, and Inter-rater Variability. J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2014 May 1. pii: S1052-3057(14)00065-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2014.02.005. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 24795096.
4)

Gareev I, Yang G, Sun J, Beylerli O, Chen X, Zhang D, Zhao B, Zhang R, Sun Z, Yang Q, Li L, Pavlov V, Safin S, Zhao S. Circulating MicroRNAs as a Potential Non-invasive Biomarkers of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage. World Neurosurg. 2019 Sep 13. pii: S1878-8750(19)32446-5. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.09.016. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31525485.

Fungal Infections of the Central Nervous System Pathogens, Diagnosis, and Management

Fungal Infections of the Central Nervous System Pathogens, Diagnosis, and Management

by Mehmet Turgut (Editor), Sundaram Challa (Editor), Ali Akhaddar (Editor)

List Price:$199.99

Buy

This book provides comprehensive information on fungal infections of the central nervous system (CNS). Fungal infections are still a major public health challenge for most of the developing world and even for developed countries due to the rising numbers of immune compromised patients, refugee movements, and international travel. Although fungal infections involving the CNS are not particularly common, when they do occur, the results can be devastating in spite of recent advances and currently available therapies. Further, over the past several years, the incidence of these infections has seen a steep rise among immunodeficient patients. In this context, aggressive surgery remains the mainstay of management, but conservative antifungal drug treatment complemented by aggressive surgical debridement may be necessary. Yet the optimal management approach to fungal infections of the CNS remains controversial, owing to the limited individual experience and the variable clinical course of the conditions. Addressing that problem, this comprehensive book offers the ideal resource for neurosurgeons, neurologists and other specialists working with infectious diseases.

WhatsApp WhatsApp us
%d bloggers like this: