Targeted Muscle Reinnervation: A Neural Interface for Artificial Limbs (Series in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering) 1st Edition

Targeted Muscle Reinnervation: A Neural Interface for Artificial Limbs (Series in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering) 1st Edition

Developed by Dr. Todd A. Kuiken and Dr. Gregory A. Dumanian, targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a new approach to accessing motor control signals from peripheral nerves after amputation and providing sensory feedback to prosthesis users. This practical approach has many advantages over other neural-machine interfaces for the improved control of artificial limbs. Targeted Muscle Reinnervation: A Neural Interface for Artificial Limbs provides a template for the clinical implementation of TMR and a resource for further research in this new area of science.
After describing the basic scientific concepts and key principles underlying TMR, the book presents surgical approaches to transhumeral and shoulder disarticulation amputations. It explores the possible role of TMR in the prevention and treatment of end-neuromas and details the principles of rehabilitation, prosthetic fitting, and occupational therapy for TMR patients. The book also describes transfer sensation and discusses the surgical and functional outcomes of the first several TMR patients. It concludes with emerging research on using TMR to further improve the function and quality of life for people with limb loss.
With contributions from renowned leaders in the field, including Drs. Kuiken and Dumanian, this book is a useful guide to implementing TMR in patients with high-level upper limb amputations. It also supplies the foundation to enable improvements in TMR techniques and advances in prosthetic technology.

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Book: Bioengineering for Surgery: The Critical Engineer Surgeon Interface

Bioengineering for Surgery: The Critical Engineer Surgeon Interface

By Walid Farhat, James Drake

Bioengineering for Surgery: The Critical Engineer Surgeon Interface
List Price: $210.00
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Bioengineering is the application of engineering principles to address challenges in the fields of biology and medicine encompassing the principles of engineering design to the full spectrum of living systems. In surgery, recent advances in minimal invasive surgery and robotics are the culmination of the work that both engineers and surgeons have achieved in the medical field through an exciting and challenging interface. This interface rests on the medical curiosity and engineering solutions that lead eventually to collaboration and development of new ideas and technologies. Most recently, innovation by surgeons has become a fundamental contribution to medical research in the surgical field, and it is through effective communication between surgeons and biomedical engineers and promoting collaborative initiatives that translational research is possible. Bioengineering for Surgery explores this interface between surgeons and engineers and how it leads to innovation processes, providing clinical results, fundraising and prestige for the academic institution. This book is designed to teach students how engineers can fit in with their intended environment and what type of materials and design considerations must be taken into account in regards to medical ideas.

  • introduces engineers to basic medical knowledge
  • provides surgeons and medical professionals with basic engineering principles that are necessary to meet the surgeons’ needs

Product Details

  • Published on: 2015-10-26
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: .60″ h x 6.10″ w x 9.10″ l, .0 pounds
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 238 pages

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About the Author
Dr Walid Farhat is a Paediatric Urologist at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. He is also an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto.
Dr James Drake is the Head of Neurosurgery at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada and is also a Professor at the University of Toronto.
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