Cerebral cavernous malformation treatment

Cerebral cavernous malformation treatment

see Intracranial cavernous malformation surgery.


There have been few comparative studys of microsurgical excision vs conservative treatment of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) and none of them has reliably demonstrated a statistically and clinically significant difference.

A prospective, population-based study to identify and independently validate definite cerebral cavernous malformation diagnoses first made in 1999-2003 in Scottish adult residents, used multiple sources of prospective follow-up to assess adults’ dependence and to identify and independently validate outcome events.

Moultrie et al., used univariate and multivariable survival analyses to test the influence of CCM excision on outcome, adjusted for prognostic factors and baseline imbalances.

Of 134 adults, 25 underwent CCM excision; these adults were younger (34 vs 43 years at diagnosis, p = 0.004) and more likely to present with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or focal neurological deficit than adults managed conservatively (48% vs 26%; odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-6.5). During 5 years of follow-up, CCM excision was associated with a deterioration to an Oxford Handicap Scale score 2-6 sustained over at least 2 successive years (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.3) and the occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or new focal neurologic deficit (adjusted HR 3.6, 95% CI 1.3-10.0).

CCM excision was associated with worse outcomes over 5 years compared to conservative management. Long-term follow-up will determine whether this difference is sustained over patients’ lifetimes. Meanwhile, a randomized controlled trial appears justified.

CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class III evidence that CCM excision worsens short-term disability scores and increases the risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and new focal neurologic deficits 1).


Antithrombotic therapy use is associated with a lower risk of intracranial haemorrhage or focal neurological deficit from cerebral cavernous malformations than avoidance of antithrombotic therapy. These findings provide reassurance about safety for clinical practice and require further investigation in a randomised controlled trial 2).

References

1)

Moultrie F, Horne MA, Josephson CB, Hall JM, Counsell CE, Bhattacharya JJ, Papanastassiou V, Sellar RJ, Warlow CP, Murray GD, Al-Shahi Salman R; Scottish Audit of Intracranial Vascular Malformations (SAIVMs) steering committee and collaborators. Outcome after surgical or conservative management of cerebral cavernous malformations. Neurology. 2014 Aug 12;83(7):582-9. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000000684. Epub 2014 Jul 3. PubMed PMID: 24994841.
2)

Zuurbier SM, Hickman CR, Tolias CS, Rinkel LA, Leyrer R, Flemming KD, Bervini D, Lanzino G, Wityk RJ, Schneble HM, Sure U, Al-Shahi Salman R; Scottish Audit of Intracranial Vascular Malformations Steering Committee. Long-term antithrombotic therapy and risk of intracranial haemorrhage from cerebral cavernous malformations: a population-based cohort study, systematic review, and meta-analysis. Lancet Neurol. 2019 Aug 6. pii: S1474-4422(19)30231-5. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(19)30231-5. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31401075.

Insular Cavernous Malformation

Insular Cavernous Malformation

Surgical management of cavernous malformation (CM) of the insula consists of total resection of the lesion and the surrounding gliosis to avoid or reduce seizures. When located in the dominant hemisphere, an awake craniotomy with intraoperative mapping reduces the risk of functional damage. The insula is covered by the operculum and has a relationship with the middle cerebral artery and its branches that run along its lateral cortical surface. Therefore high expertise is required to manage the exposure of the insula and its complex anatomy.

Videos

https://www.neurosurgicalatlas.com/cases/insular-cavernous-malformation


A video of Burkhardt et al. demonstrated the microsurgical resection of a de novo CM adjacent to a previously treated high-grade AVM and clipping of a middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm. A 70-yr-old male with history of radiosurgery for AVM presented with aphasia and confusion. Preoperative angiography showed complete occlusion of the AVM. MRI showed multiple cystic lesions suspicious for radiation-induced necrosis and CM. IRB approval and patient consent was obtained. A pterional craniotomy was performed with transsylvian exposure of the insula. The radiated feeding arteries were followed to the occluded AVM nidus. A CM was noted deep to this candelabra of the MCA vessels, which were mobilized to access and resect the CM. A small incision was made in this insular cortex underneath the malformation circumferentially freeing it of adhesions. The sclerotic AVM nidus was circumferentially dissected and removed en bloc. Thorough exploration of the resection cavity revealed no residual CM or AVM nidus. Attention was then turned to the M2-MCA bifurcation aneurysm, which was occluded with a straight clip. Postoperative imaging confirmed complete CM resection. The patient recovered from his aphasia. This case demonstrates the management of a radiation-induced de novo CM following treatment of a high-grade AVM. Radiographic follow-up for radiosurgically treated AVM is needed to rule out long-term complications. Bleeding from a de novo CM mimics bleeding from residual AVM nidus, requiring careful angiographic evaluation 1).


A video of Norat et al. illustrated the use of a trans-Sylvian, trans-sulcal approach to resect a deep insular/basal ganglia cavernous malformation in a young patient. The use of the neuronavigation is essential for success in these types of operation as this tool limits the surgeon’s footprint in eloquent brain. Unlike superficial lesions where the removal of hemosiderin stained brain is possible and often safe, resection of deep-seated lesions requires the surgeon to distinguish between hemosiderin-stained brain and residual cavernous malformation. This task is not simple, and residual cavernous malformation is the most common reason for re-bleed in patients who have undergone surgery. Resection of symptomatic cavernous malformations in deep locations can be performed safely, but outcomes are heavily influenced by proper patient selection and surgeon experience. In patients with multiple cerebral cavernous malformations, such as the one in this case, genetic testing should be performed 2).


A video of Vigo et al. demonstrated the surgical management of a large left insular CM. A 29-year-old female with multiple CM and 7 years of partial seizures and recent onset of short memory loss. Neuroimaging showed a large left insular and planum polare CM with important mass effect and hemorrhage signs. The patient consented to surgery, and an awake pretemporal craniotomy was carried out with continuous motor evoked potential monitoring. No language function was localized in the superior temporal gyrus; therefore corticectomy of the middle portion was performed to expand the operative corridor. The vessel manipulation during wide opening of the sylvian fissure increased the risk of postoperative vasospasm and blood drain into the surgical field. The CM was exposed and completely removed without functional damage. The patient recovered from surgery without complications, and no seizures occurred at 2 months’ follow-up. Postoperative imaging showed complete removal of the CM 3).

Case reports

A 25-yr-old female presented with an acute-onset right homonymous hemianopsia. Neuroimaging revealed a large left insular CM, adjacent to the posterior limb of IC. After obtaining IRB approval and patient consent, a left pterional craniotomy with a wide distal Sylvian fissure split was completed. Using neuronavigation, an insular entry point was chosen for corticectomy. The CM was opened with subsequent hematoma evacuation and intracapsular resection technique. Inspection of the cavity revealed remnants anteromedially near the IC, which were removed meticulously, mobilizing the CM away from the IC. Postoperative MRI demonstrated gross total resection of the CM. The patient was discharged home on postoperative day 5 with persistent homonymous hemianopia.This case describes the use of a transsylvian-transinsular approach to access deep lesions with the shortest surgical distance and minimal cortical transgression. A wide Sylvian fissure split exposes the M2 MCA and accesses a safe insular zone, keeping the most eloquent structures deep to the lesion in the surgical corridor. This approach can safely expose vascular pathologies in the insular region without the risk of injury to overlying eloquent frontal and temporal lobes, even in the dominant hemisphere 4).

References

1)

Burkhardt JK, Gandhi S, Tabani H, Benet A, Lawton MT. Left Transsylvian-Transinsular Approach for Radiation-Induced Cavernous Malformation: 3-Dimensional Operative Video. Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown). 2019 Aug 1;17(2):E62-E63. doi: 10.1093/ons/opy357. PubMed PMID: 30418603.
2)

Norat P, Yagmurlu K, Park MS, Kalani MYS. Keyhole, Trans-Sylvian, Trans-Sulcal Resection of an Insular Cerebral Cavernous Malformation: 2-Dimensional Operative Video. Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown). 2019 Jul 1;17(1):E18. doi: 10.1093/ons/opy326. PubMed PMID: 30496497.
3)

Vigo V, Zanabria Ortiz R, Paganelli SL, da Costa MDS, Campos Filho JM, Chaddad-Neto F. Awake Craniotomy for Removal of Left Insular Cavernous Malformation. World Neurosurg. 2019 Feb;122:209. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2018.10.220. Epub 2018 Nov 9. PubMed PMID: 30415050.
4)

Mascitelli J, Gandhi S, Wright E, Lawton MT. Transsylvian-Transinsular Approach for an Insular Cavernous Malformation Resection: 3-Dimensional Operative Video. Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown). 2019 Feb 1;16(2):50. doi: 10.1093/ons/opy155. PubMed PMID: 29905877.

Ferumoxytol magnetic resonance imaging for intracranial arteriovenous malformation

Ferumoxytol magnetic resonance imaging for intracranial arteriovenous malformation

Central nervous system vascular malformations (VMs) result from abnormal vascular- and/or angiogenesis. Cavernomas and arteriovenous malformations are also sites of active inflammation 1).

Inflammation is increasingly being recognized as contributing to the underlying pathophysiology of cerebral aneurysms and brain arteriovenous malformationFerumoxytol is being increasingly used for both its prolonged intravascular imaging characteristics and its utility as an inflammatory marker when imaged in a delayed fashion 2) 3) 4) 5).

Children with intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) undergo digital DSA for lesion surveillance following their initial diagnosis. However, DSA carries risks of radiation exposure, particularly for the growing pediatric brain and over lifetime. Huang et al. evaluated whether MRI enhanced with a blood pool ferumoxytol (Fe) contrast agent (Fe-MRI) can be used for surveillance of residual or recurrent AVMs.

A retrospective cohort was assembled of children with an established AVM diagnosis who underwent surveillance by both DSA and 3-T Fe-MRI from 2014 to 2016. Two neuroradiologists blinded to the DSA results independently assessed Fe-enhanced T1-weighted spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in steady state (Fe-SPGR) scans and, if available, arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion scans for residual or recurrent AVMs. Diagnostic confidence was examined using a Likert scale. Sensitivity, specificity, and intermodality reliability were determined using DSA studies as the gold standard. Radiation exposure related to DSA was calculated as total dose area product (TDAP) and effective dose.

Fifteen patients were included in this study (mean age 10 years, range 3-15 years). The mean time between the first surveillance DSA and Fe-MRI studies was 17 days (SD 47). Intermodality agreement was excellent between Fe-SPGR and DSA (κ = 1.00) but poor between ASL and DSA (κ = 0.53; 95% CI 0.18-0.89). The sensitivity and specificity for detecting residual AVMs using Fe-SPGR were 100% and 100%, and using ASL they were 72% and 100%, respectively. Radiologists reported overall high diagnostic confidence using Fe-SPGR. On average, patients received two surveillance DSA studies over the study period, which on average equated to a TDAP of 117.2 Gy×cm2 (95% CI 77.2-157.4 Gy×cm2) and an effective dose of 7.8 mSv (95% CI 4.4-8.8 mSv).

Fe-MRI performed similarly to DSA for the surveillance of residual AVMs. Future multicenter studies could further investigate the efficacy of Fe-MRI as a noninvasive alternative to DSA for monitoring AVMs in children 6).


The purpose of a study was to evaluate the performance of ferumoxytol-enhanced MRA using a high-resolution 3D volumetric sequence (fe-SPGR) for visualizing and grading pediatric brain AVMs in comparison with CTA and DSA, which is the current imaging gold standard. METHODS In this retrospective cohort study, 21 patients with AVMs evaluated by fe-SPGR, CTA, and DSA between April 2014 and August 2017 were included. Two experienced raters graded AVMs using Spetzler-Martin criteria on all imaging studies. Lesion conspicuity (LC) and diagnostic confidence (DC) were assessed using a 5-point Likert scale, and interrater agreement was determined. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to assess the raters’ grades and scores of LC and DC, with subsequent post hoc pairwise comparisons to assess for statistically significant differences between pairs of groups at p < 0.05. RESULTS Assigned Spetzler-Martin grades for AVMs on DSA, fe-SPGR, and CTA were not significantly different (p = 0.991). LC and DC scores were higher with fe-SPGR than with CTA (p < 0.05). A significant difference in LC scores was found between CTA and fe-SPGR (p < 0.001) and CTA and DSA (p < 0.001) but not between fe-SPGR and DSA (p = 0.146). A significant difference in DC scores was found among DSA, fe-SPGR, and CTA (p < 0.001) and between all pairs of the groups (p < 0.05). Interrater agreement was good to very good for all image groups (κ = 0.77-1.0, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Fe-SPGR performed robustly in the diagnostic evaluation of brain AVMs, with improved visual depiction of AVMs compared with CTA and comparable Spetzler-Martin grading relative to CTA and DSA 7).

References

1)

Dósa E, Tuladhar S, Muldoon LL, Hamilton BE, Rooney WD, Neuwelt EA. MRI using ferumoxytol improves the visualization of central nervous system vascular malformations. Stroke. 2011 Jun;42(6):1581-8. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.607994. Epub 2011 Apr 14. PubMed PMID: 21493906; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3412426.
2)

Zanaty M, Chalouhi N, Starke RM, Jabbour P, Hasan D. Molecular Imaging in Neurovascular Diseases: The Use of Ferumoxytol to Assess Cerebral Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations. Top Magn Reson Imaging. 2016 Apr;25(2):57-61. doi: 10.1097/RMR.0000000000000086. Review. PubMed PMID: 27049242.
3)

Chalouhi N, Jabbour P, Magnotta V, Hasan D. Molecular imaging of cerebrovascular lesions. Transl Stroke Res. 2014 Apr;5(2):260-8. doi: 10.1007/s12975-013-0291-0. Epub 2013 Oct 23. Review. PubMed PMID: 24323714.
4)

Chalouhi N, Jabbour P, Magnotta V, Hasan D. The emerging role of ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI in the management of cerebrovascular lesions. Molecules. 2013 Aug 13;18(8):9670-83. doi: 10.3390/molecules18089670. Review. PubMed PMID: 23945642; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6270297.
5)

Hasan DM, Amans M, Tihan T, Hess C, Guo Y, Cha S, Su H, Martin AJ, Lawton MT, Neuwelt EA, Saloner DA, Young WL. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI to Image Inflammation within Human Brain Arteriovenous Malformations: A Pilot Investigation. Transl Stroke Res. 2012 Jul;3(Suppl 1):166-73. doi: 10.1007/s12975-012-0172-y. PubMed PMID: 23002401; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3445332.
6)

Huang Y, Singer TG, Iv M, Lanzman B, Nair S, Stadler JA, Wang J, Edwards MSB, Grant GA, Cheshier SH, Yeom KW. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI for surveillance of pediatric cerebral arteriovenous malformations. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2019 Jul 19:1-8. doi: 10.3171/2019.5.PEDS1957. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31323627.
7)

Iv M, Choudhri O, Dodd RL, Vasanawala SS, Alley MT, Moseley M, Holdsworth SJ, Grant G, Cheshier S, Yeom KW. High-resolution 3D volumetric contrast-enhanced MR angiography with a blood pool agent (ferumoxytol) for diagnostic evaluation of pediatric brain arteriovenous malformations. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2018 Sep;22(3):251-260. doi: 10.3171/2018.3.PEDS17723. Epub 2018 Jun 8. PubMed PMID: 29882734.
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