Traumatic Brain Injury: Assessment and Management

Traumatic Brain Injury: Assessment and Management

$127.24

Buy

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), also referred to as intracranial injury, occurs due to trauma to the brain. It can cause a range of physical, cognitive, behavioral, social and emotional symptoms. Its outcome can vary from complete recovery to permanent disability or death. TBI can occur due to an accident, physical violence or a fall. Its diagnosis involves the use of techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography. Depending on the extent of the injury, confirmed through a diagnosis, treatment can be minimal or extensive involving medications, surgery and rehabilitation therapies. This book discusses the fundamental as well as modern approaches in the assessment and management of traumatic brain injury. The topics included in this book are of utmost significance and bound to provide incredible insights to readers. It will prove to be immensely beneficial to students and researchers in this domain.

Scandinavian guidelines for initial management of minimal, mild, and moderate head injuries

Scandinavian guidelines for initial management of minimal, mild, and moderate head injuries

The Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee (SNC) published practical, evidence based guidelines for children with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 9-15.

The Scandinavian Guidelines for Initial Management of Minimal, Mild, and Moderate Head Injuries in Adults (Scandinavian guidelines) are the first to incorporate serum measurement of the S100 astroglial calcium-binding protein B (S100B) to emergency department (ED) triage of patients with head injury (HI).

1).


A prospective validation study was conducted in the ED of the Tampere University Hospital, Finland, between November 2015 to November 2016. All consecutive adult patients with HI presenting to the ED within 24 hours from injury were eligible for inclusion. Venous blood for S100B sampling was drawn from all patients and the result was available at the ED. Head CTs were performed according to the on-call physician’s evaluation. Only the samples collected within 6 hours after injury were used. A one-week follow-up was conducted to identify possible HI-related complications. A total of 295 patients (median age=67.0 years, range=18-100; women=48.8%) were enrolled. Of those, 196 (66.4%) were scanned. Acute traumatic lesions were detected on 31 (15.8%) of the scans. Two of the CT-positive patients were scanned without a guidelines-based indication. These lesions did not require any specific treatment or repeated imaging. The guidelines-based sensitivity was 0.94 (95% CI=0.77-0.99) and specificity 0.19 (95% CI=0.13-0.26) for predicting traumatic intracranial CT abnormalities. The positive and negative predictive value for positive head CT was 0.18 (95% CI=0.12-0.25) and 0.94 (95% CI=0.78-0.99), respectively. In the mild-low risk group, no false negative S100B values were recorded. Thirteen patients (4.4%) were re-admitted to the ED and 2 patients (0.7%) died one week after the primary HI. The deaths were unrelated to the injury. None of these adverse events were directly caused by a primarily undiagnosed intracranial injury. The Scandinavian guidelines incorporated with S100B are a valid means of screening clinically significant acute traumatic lesions following HI and have the potential to reduce unnecessary CT scanning 2).


In a large prospective cohort of children (< 18 years) with TBI of all severities, from ten Australian and New Zealand hospitals, was used to assess the SNC guidelines. Firstly, a validation study was performed according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the SNC guideline. Secondly, they compared the accuracy of SNC, CATCH, CHALICE and PECARN CDRs in patients with GCS 13-15 only. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated for outcome measures of need for neurosurgery, clinically important TBI (ciTBI) and brain injury on CT.

The SNC guideline could be applied to 19,007/20,137 of patients (94.4%) in the validation process. The frequency of ciTBI decreased significantly with stratification by decreasing risk according to the SNC guideline. Sensitivities for the detection of neurosurgery, ciTBI and brain injury on CT were 100.0% (95% CI 89.1-100.0; 32/32), 97.8% (94.5-99.4; 179/183) and 95% (95% CI 91.6-97.2; 262/276), respectively, with a CT/admission rate of 42% (mandatory CT rate of 5%, 18% CT or admission and 19% only admission). Four patients with ciTBI were missed; none needed specific intervention. In the homogenous comparison cohort of 18,913 children, the SNC guideline performed similar to the PECARN CDR, when compared with the other CDRs.

The SNC guideline showed a high accuracy in a large external validation cohort and compares well with published CDRs for the management of paediatric TBI 3).

References

1)

Ingebrigtsen T, Romner B, Kock-Jensen C. Scandinavian guidelines for initial management of minimal, mild, and moderate head injuries. The Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee. J Trauma. 2000 Apr;48(4):760-6. PubMed PMID: 10780615.
2)

Minkkinen M, Iverson GL, Kotilainen AK, Pauniaho SL, Mattila V, Lehtimäki T, Berghem K, Posti JP, Luoto TM. Prospective Validation of the Scandinavian Guidelines for Initial Management of Minimal, Mild, and Moderate Head Injuries in Adults. J Neurotrauma. 2019 May 21. doi: 10.1089/neu.2018.6351. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31111795.
3)

Undén J, Dalziel SR, Borland ML, Phillips N, Kochar A, Lyttle MD, Bressan S, Cheek JA, Neutze J, Donath S, Hearps S, Oakley E, Dalton S, Gilhotra Y, Babl FE; Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT). External validation of the Scandinavian guidelines for management of minimal, mild and moderate head injuries in children. BMC Med. 2018 Oct 12;16(1):176. doi: 10.1186/s12916-018-1166-8. PubMed PMID: 30309392; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6182797.

Comprehensive Management of Vestibular Schwannoma

Comprehensive Management of Vestibular Schwannoma

Comprehensive Edition by Matthew L Carlson (Editor), Michael J. Link (Editor), Colin L.W. Driscoll (Editor)

List Price: $175.49

Buy

The definitive resource on clinical management of vestibular schwannoma from world renowned experts

Although a histologically benign and relatively uncommon tumor, otolaryngologists and neurosurgeons have maintained a lasting and deep-rooted fascination with vestibular schwannoma, also known as acoustic neuroma. Advancements in microsurgical technique, radiosurgery, and radiotherapy, coupled with an increased understanding of the natural history of the disease, have made modern management of this tumor considerably more complex. Concurrently, new controversies have added to the original debates among pioneering surgeons, with the pendulum swinging between conservatism and definitive cure.

Comprehensive Management of Vestibular Schwannoma, by distinguished Mayo Clinic clinicians and renowned international contributors, is a comprehensive textbook covering all the clinical aspects of vestibular schwannoma management. Eighty-four chapters written by multidisciplinary experts including otolaryngologists, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, neurologists, neuroradiologists, and audiologists, ensure a balanced view of all treatment modalities for sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 2-associated vestibular schwannoma.

Key Features

Evaluation, surgical and nonsurgical approaches, rehabilitation, controversies, and long-term clinical outcomes Detailed illustrations by Robert Morreale, senior medical illustrator at the Mayo Clinic, highlight relevant anatomy and surgical approaches Chapter summary tables provide readers with a rapid clinical reference derived from the published world literature The chapter “Anatomy of Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery” by the late internationally renowned neurosurgeon Albert L. Rhoton Jr. reflects his major contributions on this subject With inclusion of fundamental principles to advanced concepts, this is a robust resource for residents, fellows, and early attending physicians, as well as mid- to later-career physicians who care for patients with vestibular schwannoma.

This book includes complimentary access to a digital copy on https://medone.thieme.com.

× How can I help you?
WhatsApp WhatsApp us
%d bloggers like this: