Resective epilepsy surgery

Resective epilepsy surgery

Resective epilepsy surgery based on an invasive EEG-monitors performed with subdural grids (SDG) or depth electrodes (stereoelectroencephalographySEEG) is considered to be the best option towards achieving seizure-free state in drug resistant epilepsy.

Despite good outcomes from high-quality clinical trials, referrals of patients with seizures refractory to medical treatment remain infrequent 1).

Three RCTs (two adult RCTs and one pediatric RCT) consistently supported the efficacy of resective surgery as treatment for epilepsy with semiology localized to the mesial temporal lobe. In these studies, 58-100% of the patients who underwent resective surgery achieved seizure freedom, in comparison to 0-13% of medically treated patients. In another RCT, the likelihood of seizure freedom after resective surgery was independent of the surgical approach (transSylvian [64%] versus subtemporal [62%]). Two other RCTs demonstrated that hippocampal resection is essential to optimize seizure control. But, no significant gain in seizure control was achieved beyond removing 2.5 cm of the hippocampus. Across RCTs, minor complications (deficit lasting < 3 months) and major complications (deficit > 3 months) ranged 2-5% and 5-11% respectively. However, nonincapacitating superior subquadrantic visual-field defects (not typically considered a minor or major complication) were noted in up to 55% of the surgical cohort. The available RCTs provide compelling support for resective surgery as a treatment for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and offer insights toward optimal surgical strategy 2)

Complete removal of the epileptogenic zone significantly increases the chances for postoperative seizure-freedom. In complex surgical candidates, delineation of the epileptogenic zone requires a long-term invasive video/EEG from intracranial electrodes. It is especially challenging to achieve a complete resection in deep brain structures such as opercular insular cortex 3).

Belohlavkova et al. retrospectively reviewed data of pediatric patients operated in Motol Epilepsy Center between October 2010 and June 2020 who underwent resections guided by intraoperative visual detection of depth electrodes following SEEG. The outcome in terms of seizure- and AED-freedom was assessed individually in each patient.

Nineteen patients (age at surgery 2.9-18.6 years, median 13 years) were included in the study. The epileptogenic zone involved opercular insular cortex in eighteen patients. The intraoperative detection of the electrodes was successful in seventeen patients and the surgery was regarded complete in sixteen. Thirteen patients were seizure-free at final follow-up including six drug-free cases. The successful intraoperative detection of the electrodes was associated with favorable outcome in terms of achieving complete resection and seizure-freedom in most cases. On the contrary, the patients in whom the procedure failed had poor postsurgical outcome.

The reported technique helps to achieve the complete resection in challenging patients with the epileptogenic zone in deep brain structures 4)


81 patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) who had undergone resective epilepsy surgery at Sanbo Brain Hospital, between April 2004 and June 2019. They estimated the cumulative probability of remaining seizure-free and plotted survival curves. Variables were compared using Mann-Whitney U, Pearson’s correlation, continuity correction, and Fisher’s exact chi-square tests. Prognostic predictors were analyzed using log-rank (Mantel-Cox) tests and Cox regression models.

At the last follow-up, 48 (59.3%) patients were classified as International League Against Epilepsy Class 1 (including 14 patients who had seizures <3 times postoperatively on the same or different day and were seizure-free at all other times). The estimated cumulative probability of remaining seizure-free postoperatively was 69.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 58.8-79.2%), 61.9% (95% CI 51.1-72.7%), and 55.0% (95% CI 42.8-67.2%) at 2, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The mean time of remaining seizure-free was 7.24 ± 0.634 years (95% CI 6.00-8.49); en bloc resection was an essential positive predictor of postoperative seizure freedom, as was age at seizure onset, regional interictal video-electroencephalography pattern, and temporal lobe surgery. The longer the seizure-free time, the less likely a relapse. Patients who postoperatively experienced seizures remained likely to recover.

They demonstrated the efficacy of tuberous sclerosis complex treatment and intractable epilepsy with surgery. Detailed perioperative tests are a reliable predictor of postoperative seizure freedom 5)


1)

Jobst BC, Cascino GD. Resective epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant focal epilepsy: a review. JAMA. 2015 Jan 20;313(3):285-93. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.17426. PMID: 25602999.
2)

Cramer SW, McGovern RA, Wang SG, Chen CC, Park MC. Resective epilepsy surgery: assessment of randomized controlled trials. Neurosurg Rev. 2021 Aug;44(4):2059-2067. doi: 10.1007/s10143-020-01432-x. Epub 2020 Nov 9. PMID: 33169227.
3) , 4)

Belohlavkova A, Jahodova A, Kudr M, Benova B, Ebel M, Liby P, Taborsky J, Jezdik P, Janca R, Kyncl M, Tichy M, Krsek P. May intraoperative detection of stereotactically inserted intracerebral electrodes increase precision of resective epilepsy surgery? Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2021 Sep 25;35:49-55. doi: 10.1016/j.ejpn.2021.09.012. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34610561.
5)

Huang Q, Zhou J, Wang X, Li T, Wang M, Wang J, Teng P, Qi X, Zhu M, Luan G, Zhai F. Predictors and Long-term Outcome of Resective Epilepsy Surgery in Patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: A Single-centre Retrospective Cohort Study. Seizure. 2021 Mar 25;88:45-52. doi: 10.1016/j.seizure.2021.03.022. Epub ahead of print. PMID:

Brainstem Neurosurgery

Brainstem Neurosurgery

by Michael Ghali (Author), George Ghali (Author)

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Microsurgical operations in the vicinity of the bulb or its intraaxial contents is frequently fraught with operator angst and catastrophic neurologic deficits. Accordingly, the most rudimentary of Nature’s beautiful creations also happens to be among its most complex and delicate. The brainstem houses the core circuitry generating sympathetic tone and a breathing rhythm which maintain Life. The reticular activating propriobulbar circuitry diffusely projects and activates cerebral cortex directly and through thalamic relay nuclei to maintain Vigilance. Cranial nerve motor nuclei control the movements of the head and neck and cranial sensory nuclei represent the initial relays transmitting somatosensory information of the face and cephaloviscera to the ventral posterior medial thalamic nuclei. These nuclei are complexly, though discretely and wisely organized within its interior and multimodally modulated by suprabulbar and peripheral influences. Haphazard microsurgical maneuvers or the slightest transgression upon one of its critical structures may hasten and expedite a patient’s rapid demise. Fortuitously, innovation in microsurgical techniques by the works of Emeritus Professor Dr. Robert F. Spetzler and Emeritus Professor Dr. Albert I. Rhoton has provided us with an elegant set of operative steps to achieve the safe and effective removal of pathology sans deficit, rendering the safe removal of previously inoperable neoplastic and vascular lesions commonplace and facile. Familiarity, versatility, and comfort with the faithful performance of these techniques augment the neurosurgeon’s armamentarium and confidence to intervene upon brainstem proximate and intraaxial pathology.

Neurosurgery Exit Exam Preparation/ Basic Anatomy of Ventricles

Neurosurgery Exit Exam Preparation/ Basic Anatomy of Ventricles


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