Primary central nervous system ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma

Primary central nervous system ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma

see also Primary central nervous system ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma


Primary central nervous system anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an extremely rare type of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL).

There are only nine cases reported in the literature to date, most of which have an overall survival time of no more than 8 months. Yuan et al. reported such a rare case that has a good outcome with the longest survival time and performed a literature review 1).


George et al. reported four new cases of primary central nervous system ALCL from the Mayo Clinic and incorporated additional data from five previously published cases. ALK-1 expression was determined in all nine tumors. Patient age was 4-66 years (mean 29 years) with a bimodal distribution: 6 < or = 22 years, 3 > or = 50 years. Six were female. Tumors were mostly supratentorial, five were multifocal, and seven had involvement of dura or leptomeninges. Seven tumors were T cells, two were null cells, and five of nine were ALK-1 immunopositive. Total mortality was six of nine. Three patients, 4-18 years of age (mean 13 years), were alive at 4.8-6.1 years postdiagnosis; these tumors were all ALK-positive. Five patients, 13-66 years of age (mean 43 years), died of tumor 4 days to 11 weeks postdiagnosis; four of five of these tumors were ALK-negative. One 10-year-old child with an ALK-positive tumor died of sepsis, but in remission. The central nervous system ALCL is aggressive. The study suggests that a better outcome may be associated with young age and ALK-1 positivity, prognostic parameters similar to systemic ALCL 2).


A review demonstrated that ALK-negative ALCL exhibits a poor prognosis and is very often fatal. The majority of ALK-negative patients were treated with radiotherapy or supportive care, due to their older age or poor PS. As ALK-negative ALCL tends to occur in older individuals, similar to PCNSL and DLBCL, chemoradiotherapy including HD-MTX should be initiated earlier.

In conclusion, findings indicate that the prognosis of ALCL of the CNS is correlated with ALK positivity and patient age of <40 years. Chemoradiotherapy with MTX is recommended as the standard treatment for ALCL. However, additional multicenter studies including large numbers of cases are required 3).

A 19-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital complaining of dizzinessCT and MRI imaging showed a heterogeneous enhanced lesion in the left parieto-occipital lobe and the leptomeninges of the occipital lobe and the cerebellum. The lesion was resected and confirmed to be ALK-negative ALCL by pathological examination. Then, the patient received 10 cycles of chemotherapy with high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) and whole brain radiotherapy. The patient recovered well and was regularly followed up. He was free of symptoms without recurrence on imaging examination 3 years later. ALCL is a rare type of PCNSL. HD-MTX combined with radiation is an effective therapeutic approach. However, further prospective studies with a large number of patients are needed to identify the biological characteristics of this rare type of PCNSL 4).


1) , 4)

Yuan C, Duan H, Wang Y, Zhang J, Ou J, Wang W, Zhang M. Primary central nervous system ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma: a case report and literature review. Ann Palliat Med. 2021 Jul 1:apm-21-557. doi: 10.21037/apm-21-557. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34263607.
2)

George DH, Scheithauer BW, Aker FV, Kurtin PJ, Burger PC, Cameselle-Teijeiro J, McLendon RE, Parisi JE, Paulus W, Roggendorf W, Sotelo C. Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the central nervous system: prognostic effect of ALK-1 expression. Am J Surg Pathol. 2003 Apr;27(4):487-93. doi: 10.1097/00000478-200304000-00008. PMID: 12657933.
3)

Nomura M, Narita Y, Miyakita Y, Ohno M, Fukushima S, Maruyama T, Muragaki Y, Shibui S. Clinical presentation of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in the central nervous system. Mol Clin Oncol. 2013 Jul;1(4):655-660. doi: 10.3892/mco.2013.110. Epub 2013 Apr 30. PMID: 24649224; PMCID: PMC3915681.

Primary Central Nervous System Angiosarcoma

Primary Central Nervous System Angiosarcoma

Angiosarcoma is an infrequent tumor among sarcomas, especially presenting as a primary tumor within the central nervous system, which can lead to rapid neurological deterioration and death in few months.

Mena et al. reported in 1991 eight patients with primary angiosarcoma of the central nervous system these included five males and three females ranging in age from 2 weeks to 72 years (mean 38 years). Of the eight neoplasms, six were located in the cerebral hemispheres and one was in the meninges; the site was unknown in the other. All patients underwent surgical resection. Five of the eight patients died, four within 4 months after surgery and one after 30 months. Two of the remaining three patients were 17 and 27 years old at the time of diagnosis and were alive at follow-up review 39 and 102 months after surgery, respectively. One patient was lost to follow-up monitoring. Microscopically, all eight tumors demonstrated a well-differentiated pattern with irregular vascular channels and intraluminal papillae; in addition, four showed poorly differentiated solid areas. Immunohistochemical staining of neoplastic cells to factor VIII-related antigen and Ulex europaeus agglutinin I was performed in five tumors and was focally positive in four. No correlation could be shown between the histological features and the growth and biological behavior of the tumors 1)

Valera-Melé et al. presented a 41-year old man with a right frontal enhancing hemorrhagic lesion. Surgery was performed with histopathological findings suggesting a primary central nervous system angiosarcoma. He was discharged uneventfully and received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. At 5 months, the follow-up MRI showed two lesions with an acute subdural hematoma, suggesting a relapse. Surgery was again conducted finding tumoral membranes attached to the internal layer of the dura mater around the right hemisphere. The patient died a few days later due to the recurrence of the subdural hematoma. This case report illustrates a rare and lethal complication of an unusual tumor. The literature reviewed shows that gross-total resection with adjuvant radiotherapy seems to be the best treatment of choice 2).


Gao M, Li P, Tan C, Liu J, Tie X, Pang C, Guo Z, Lin Y. Primary Central Nervous System Angiosarcoma. World Neurosurg. 2019 Dec;132:41-46. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.08.128. Epub 2019 Aug 27. PubMed PMID: 31470162 3).


report a case of intracranial angiosarcoma in a Caucasian male and present a review of the imaging features in the recent literature. The tumor mostly presents as a well-demarcated, heterogeneous, moderately to strongly enhancing lesion with signs of intratumoral bleeding and surrounding vasogenic edema. The differential imaging features of common hemorrhagic intracranial tumors are discussed 4).


Two cases of primary angiosarcoma of the brain are well characterized by imaging, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Case 1: The first patient was a 35-year-old woman who developed exophthalmos. Subtotal resection of a left extra-axial retro-orbital mass was performed.

Case 2: our second patient was a 47-year-old man who presented with acute visual loss, word-finding difficulty, and subtle memory loss. A heterogeneously-enhancing left sphenoid wing mass was removed. We also review the literature aiming at developing a rational approach to diagnosis and treatment, given the rarity of this entity.

Gross total resection is the standard of care for primary angiosarcoma of the brain. Adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy are playing increasingly recognized roles in the therapy of these rare tumors 5).


1)

Mena H, Ribas JL, Enzinger FM, Parisi JE. Primary angiosarcoma of the central nervous system. Study of eight cases and review of the literature. J Neurosurg. 1991 Jul;75(1):73-6. doi: 10.3171/jns.1991.75.1.0073. PMID: 2045922.
2)

Valera-Melé M, Darriba Allés JV, Ruiz Juretschke F, Sola Vendrell E, Hernández Poveda JM, Montalvo Afonso A, Casitas Hernando V, García Leal R. Primary central nervous system angiosarcoma with recurrent acute subdural hematoma. Neurocirugia (Astur). 2021 Mar 22:S1130-1473(21)00027-0. English, Spanish. doi: 10.1016/j.neucir.2021.02.002. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33766476.
3)

Gao M, Li P, Tan C, Liu J, Tie X, Pang C, Guo Z, Lin Y. Primary Central Nervous System Angiosarcoma. World Neurosurg. 2019 Dec;132:41-46. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.08.128. Epub 2019 Aug 27. PubMed PMID: 31470162.
4)

Jerjir N, Lambert J, Vanwalleghem L, Casselman J. Primary Angiosarcoma of the Central Nervous System: Case Report and Review of the Imaging Features. J Belg Soc Radiol. 2016 Oct 10;100(1):82. doi: 10.5334/jbr-btr.1087. PMID: 30151480; PMCID: PMC6100495.
5)

Hackney JR, Palmer CA, Riley KO, Cure JK, Fathallah-Shaykh HM, Nabors LB. Primary central nervous system angiosarcoma: two case reports. J Med Case Rep. 2012 Aug 21;6:251. doi: 10.1186/1752-1947-6-251. PMID: 22909122; PMCID: PMC3459733.

Primary dystonia

Primary dystonia

Primary dystonia is a neurological disease with the characteristics of abnormal, involuntary twisting and turning movements, which greatly affects life quality of patients.

Primary dystonia is suspected when the dystonia is the only sign and there is no identifiable cause or structural abnormality in the central nervous system.

Primary Dystonia Etiology.

The dystonia pathophysiology is poorly understood. As opposed to secondary forms of dystoniaprimary dystonia has long been believed to lack any neuroanatomical substrate. During trajectory planning for DBS, however, conspicuous T2-hyperintense signal alterations (SA) were registered within the target region, even in young patients, where ischemia is rare.

Fifty MRIs of primary dystonia patients scheduled for DBS were analyzed. Total basal ganglia (BG) volumes, as well as proportionate SA volumes, were measured and compared to 50 age-matched control patients.

There was a 10-fold preponderance of percentaged SA within the globus pallidus (GP) in dystonia patients. The greatest disparity was in young patients <25 years. Also, total BG volume differences were observed with larger GP and markedly smaller putamen and caudate in the dystonia group.

BG morphology in primary dystonia differed from a control population. Volume reductions of the putamen and caudate may reflect functional degeneration, while volume increases of the GP may indicate overactivity. T2-hyperintensive SA in the GP of young primary dystonia patients, where microvascular lesions are highly unlikely, are striking. Their pathogenic role remains unclear 1).

Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation is the primary surgical treatment for dystonia 2). The response is better for primary dystonias, e.g. tardive dystonias than for secondary dystonias such as postanoxic, postencephalitic, perinatal, and post-stroke dystonia 3) (other targets need to be assessed). For primary dystonias, the globus pallidus internus (GPi) is the most common primary target. Good results have also been reported with STN DBS. Dyskinetic cerebral palsy in children may also be treated with pallidal stimulation 4).


Treatments for dystonia consist of oral medications, botulinum neurotoxin injections, physical therapy and surgeries. For medication-refractory dystonia, surgeries, especially deep brain stimulation (DBS), are the optimal option.

Treatment response is better for primary dystonias than for secondary dystonias. 5).

A strategy based on targeted gene panel sequencing identifies possibly pathogenic variants in fewer than 20% of cases in the early-onset and familial form of dystonia. By using Whole Exome Sequencing (WES), Wirth et al. aimed to identify the missing genetic causes in dystonic patients without a diagnosis despite gene panel sequencing.

WES was applied to DNA samples from 32 patients with early-onset or familial dystonia investigated by sequencing of a 127 movement disorders-associated gene panel. Dystonia was described according to the familial history, body distribution, evolution pattern, age of onset, associated symptoms and associated movement disorders. Rate of diagnoses was evaluated for each clinical feature.

They identified causative variants for 11 patients from 9 families in CTNNB1, SUCLG1, NUS1, CNTNAP1, KCNB1, RELN, GNAO1, HIBCH, ADCK3 genes, yielding an overall diagnostic rate of 34.4%. Diagnostic yield was higher in complex dystonia compared to non-complex dystonia (66.7%-5.9%; p < 0.002), especially in patients showing intellectual disability compared to the patients without intellectual disability (87.5%-16.7%; p < 0.002).

This approach suggests WES as an efficient tool to improve the diagnostic yield after gene panel sequencing in dystonia. Larger study are warranted to confirm a potential genetic overlap between neurodevelopmental diseases and dystonia 6).

A 13-year-old boy suffering from extremely severe primary dystonia, with a BFMDRS-M score of 118 and a TWSTRS-S score of 29. The examination of 173 genes including DYT failed to identify any abnormality. He responded ineffectively to medications. After both bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS and unilateral Vim-Vo thalamotomy (combined thalamic lesion in ventralis intermedius nucleus and ventralis oralis nucleus), his movement disorder improved dramatically. Four months and seven months after the operation, the scores of two rating scales sharply decreased. And potential brain structural changes were reflected in sensorimotor-related cortical thickness, surface area and gray matter volume from MRI, which revealed a valid method to evaluate surgical effect on the brain with enough patients.

DBS and thalamotomy is potentially an effective combination of treatments for severe medication-refractory dystonia 7).


1)

Bai X, Vajkoczy P, Faust K. Morphological Abnormalities in the Basal Ganglia of Dystonia Patients. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg. 2021 Jan 20:1-12. doi: 10.1159/000512599. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 33472209.
2) , 3)

Awan NR, Lozano A, Hamani C. Deep brain stimulation: current and future perspectives. Neurosurg Focus. 2009; 27. DOI: 10.3171/2009.4.FOCUS0982
4)

Keen JR, Przekop A, Olaya JE, et al. Deep brain sti- mulation for the treatment of childhood dystonic cerebral palsy. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2014; 14: 585–593
5)

Awan NR, Lozano A, Hamani C. Deep brain stimulation: current and future perspectives. Neurosurg Focus. 2009 Jul;27(1):E2. doi: 10.3171/2009.4.FOCUS0982. Review. PubMed PMID: 19569890.
6)

Wirth T, Tranchant C, Drouot N, Keren B, Mignot C, Cif L, Lefaucheur R, Lion-François L, Méneret A, Gras D, Roze E, Laroche C, Burbaud P, Bannier S, Lagha-Boukbiza O, Spitz MA, Laugel V, Bereau M, Ollivier E, Nitschke P, Doummar D, Rudolf G, Anheim M, Chelly J. Increased diagnostic yield in complex dystonia through exome sequencing. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2020 Apr 20;74:50-56. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2020.04.003. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 32334381.
7)

Lin H, Cai XD, Zhang DD, Liu JL, Li WP. Both DBS and Thalamotomy in a 13-year-old Patient with Primary Dystonia: A Case Report. World Neurosurg. 2018 Jun 8. pii: S1878-8750(18)31202-6. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2018.05.248. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 29890276.
WhatsApp WhatsApp us
%d bloggers like this: