Chronic subdural hematoma recurrence

Chronic subdural hematoma recurrence

In 2 large cohorts of US patients, approximately 5% to 10% of patients who underwent surgery for nontraumatic SDH were required to undergo repeated operation within 30 to 90 days. These results may inform the design of future prospective studies and trials and help practitioners calibrate their index of suspicion to ensure that patients are referred for timely surgical care 1).

Recurrence rates after chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) evacuation with any of actual techniques twist drill craniostomy (TDC), burr hole craniostomy, craniotomy range from 5% to 30%. 2).

Oslo grading system.

Hyperdense hematoma components were the strongest prognostic factor of recurrence after surgery. Awareness of these findings allows for individual risk assessment and might prompt clinicians to tailor treatment measures 3).


In the series of Santos et al. it was possible to demonstrate an age-related protective factor, analyzed as a continuous variable, regarding the recurrence of the chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), with a lower rate of recurrence the higher the age.

The results indicate that, among possible factors associated with recurrence, only age presented a protective factor with statistical significance. The fact that no significant difference between the patients submitted to trepanning or craniotomy was found favors the preferential use of burr-hole surgery as a procedure of choice due to its fast and less complex execution 4).


In the series of Han et al. independent risk factors for recurrence were as follows: age > 75 years (HR 1.72, 95% CI 1.03-2.88; p = 0.039), obesity (body mass index ≥ 25.0 kg/m2), and a bilateral operation 5).


Chon et al. shown that postoperative midline shifting (≥5 mm), diabetes mellitus, preoperative seizure, preoperative width of hematoma (≥20 mm), and anticoagulant therapy were independent predictors of the recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

According to internal architecture of hematoma, the rate of recurrence was significantly lower in the homogeneous and the trabecular type than the laminar and separated type 6).


The recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma cSDH seems to be related to the excessive neoangiogenesis in the parietal membrane, which is mediated via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This is found to be elevated in the hematoma fluid and is dependent on eicosanoid/prostaglandin and thromboxane synthesis via cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2).

see Chronic subdural hematoma and anticoagulant therapy.

Antiplatelet therapy significantly influences the recurrence of CSDH 7).

Timing of Low-Dose Aspirin Discontinuation for chronic subdural hematoma.

Pneumocephalus

Remaining pneumocephalus is seen as an approved factor of recurrence 8) 9).

Septation

Jack et al.found a 12% reoperation rate. CSDH septation (seen on computed tomogram scan) was found to be an independent risk factor for recurrence requiring reoperation (p=0.04). Larger post-operative subdural haematoma volume was also significantly associated with requiring a second drainage procedure (p<0.001). Independent risk factors of larger post-operative haematoma volume included septations within a CSDH (p<0.01), increased pre-operative haematoma volume (p<0.01), and a greater amount of parenchymal atrophy (p=0.04). A simple scoring system for quantifying recurrence risk was created and validated based on patient age (< or ≥80 years), haematoma volume (< or ≥160cc), and presence of septations within the subdural collection (yes or no).

Septations within CSDHs are associated with larger post-operative residual haematoma collections requiring repeat drainage. When septations are clearly visible within a CSDH, craniotomy might be more suitable as a primary procedure as it allows greater access to a septated subdural collection. The proposed scoring system combining haematoma volume, age, and presence of septations might be useful in identifying patients at higher risk for recurrence 10).

Membranectomy

Opening the internal hematoma membrane does not alter the rate of patients requiring revision surgery and the number of patients showing a marked residual hematoma six weeks after evacuation of a CSDH 11).

In the study of Lee et al, an extended surgical approach with partial membranectomy has no advantages regarding the rate of reoperation and the outcome. As initial treatment, burr-hole drainage with irrigation of the hematoma cavity and closed-system drainage is recommended. Extended craniotomy with membranectomy is now reserved for instances of acute rebleeding with solid hematoma 12).

Diabetes

Surgeons should consider informing patients with diabetes mellitus that this comorbidity is associated with an increased likelihood of recurrence

13) 14) 15).


Balser et al. report 11% recurrence, which included individuals who recurred as late as 3 years after initial diagnosis 16).

Close imaging follow-up is important for CSDH patients for recurrence prediction. Using quantitative CT volumetric analysis, strong evidence was provided that changes in the residual fluid volume during the ‘self-resolution’ period can be used as significantly radiological predictors of recurrence 17).

A structural equation model showed a significant association between increased antiinflammatory activity in hematoma fluid samples and a lower risk of recurrence, but this relationship was not statistically significant in venous blood samples. Moreover, these findings indicate that anti-inflammatory activities in the hematoma may play a role in the risk of a recurrence of CSDH 18).

Irrigation with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACF) decreased the rate of CSDH recurrence 19).

There is no definite operative procedure for patients with intractable chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH).

Most recurrent hematomas are managed successfully with burr hole craniostomies with postoperative closed-system drainage. Refractory hematomas may be managed with a variety of techniques, including craniotomy or subdural-peritoneal shunt placement 20).

Although many studies have reported risk factors or treatments in efforts to prevent recurrence, those have focused on single recurrence, and little cumulative data is available to analyze refractory CSDH.

Matsumoto et al. defined refractory CSDH as ≥2 recurrences, then analyzed and compared clinical factors between patients with single recurrence and those with refractory CSDH in a cohort study, to clarify whether patients with refractory CSDH experience different or more risk factors than patients with single recurrence, and whether burr-hole irrigation with closed-system drainage reduces refractory CSDH.

Seventy-five patients had at least one recurrence, with single recurrence in 62 patients and ≥2 recurrences in 13 patients. In comparing clinical characteristics, patients with refractory CSDH were significantly younger (P=0.04) and showed shorter interval to first recurrence (P<0.001). Organized CSDH was also significantly associated with refractory CSDH (P=0.02). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified first recurrence interval <1 month (OR 6.66, P<0.001) and age <71 years (OR 4.16, P<0.001) as independent risk factors for refractory CSDH. On the other hand, burr-hole irrigation with closed-system drainage did not reduce refractory CSDH.

When patients with risk factors for refractory CSDH experience recurrence, alternative surgical procedures may be considered as the second surgery, because burr-hole irrigation with closed-system drainage did not reduce refractory CSDH 21).

Implantation of a reservoir 22) 23) 24).

Subdural-peritoneal shunt 25).

Embolization of the MMA is effective for refractory CSDH or CSDH patients with a risk of recurrence, and is considered an effective therapeutic method to stop hematoma enlargement and promote resolution 26) 27) 28) 29) 30) 31).

A pilot study indicated that perioperative middle meningeal artery (MMA) embolization could be offered as the least invasive and most effectual means of treatment for resistant patients of CSDHs with 1 or more recurrences 32).

Chihara et al. have treated three cases of CSDH with MMA embolization to date, but there was a postoperative recurrence in one patient, which required a craniotomy for hematoma removal and capsulectomy. MMA embolization blocks the blood supply from the dura to the hematoma outer membrane in order to prevent recurrences of refractory CSDH. Histopathologic examination of the outer membrane of the hematoma excised during craniotomy showed foreign-body giant cells and neovascular proliferation associated with embolization. Because part of the hematoma was organized in this case, the CSDH did not resolve when the MMA was occluded, and the development of new collateral pathways in the hematoma outer membrane probably contributed to the recurrence. Therefore, in CSDH with some organized hematoma, MMA embolization may not be effective. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be performed in these patients before embolization 33).

see Chronic subdural hematoma recurrence case series.

Chronic subdural hematoma recurrence case reports.


1)

Knopman J, Link TW, Navi BB, Murthy SB, Merkler AE, Kamel H. Rates of Repeated Operation for Isolated Subdural Hematoma Among Older Adults. JAMA Netw Open. 2018 Oct 5;1(6):e183737. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.3737. PubMed PMID: 30646255.
2)

Escosa Baé M, Wessling H, Salca HC, de Las Heras Echeverría P. Use of twist-drill craniostomy with drain in evacuation of chronic subdural hematomas: independent predictors of recurrence. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2011 May;153(5):1097-103. doi: 10.1007/s00701-010-0903-3. Epub 2010 Dec 31. PubMed PMID: 21193935.
3)

Miah IP, Tank Y, Rosendaal FR, Peul WC, Dammers R, Lingsma HF, den Hertog HM, Jellema K, van der Gaag NA; Dutch Chronic Subdural Hematoma Research Group. Radiological prognostic factors of chronic subdural hematoma recurrence: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Neuroradiology. 2020 Oct 22. doi: 10.1007/s00234-020-02558-x. Epub ahead of print. Erratum in: Neuroradiology. 2020 Nov 5;: PMID: 33094383.
4)

Santos RGD, Xander PAW, Rodrigues LHDS, Costa GHFD, Veiga JCE, Aguiar GB. Analysis of predisposing factors for chronic subdural hematoma recurrence. Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992). 2019 Jul 22;65(6):834-838. doi: 10.1590/1806-9282.65.6.834. PubMed PMID: 31340313.
5)

Han MH, Ryu JI, Kim CH, Kim JM, Cheong JH, Yi HJ. Predictive factors for recurrence and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic subdural hematoma. J Neurosurg. 2017 Nov;127(5):1117-1125. doi: 10.3171/2016.8.JNS16867. Epub 2016 Dec 16. PubMed PMID: 27982768.
6)

Chon KH, Lee JM, Koh EJ, Choi HY. Independent predictors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2012 Sep;154(9):1541-8. doi: 10.1007/s00701-012-1399-9. Epub 2012 Jun 1. PubMed PMID: 22653496.
7)

Wada M, Yamakami I, Higuchi Y, Tanaka M, Suda S, Ono J, Saeki N. Influence of antiplatelet therapy on postoperative recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma: a multicenter retrospective study in 719 patients. Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2014 May;120:49-54. doi: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2014.02.007. Epub 2014 Feb 24. PubMed PMID: 24731576.
8)

Mori K, Maeda M (2001) Surgical treatment of chronic subdural hematoma in 500 consecutive cases: clinical characteristics, surgical outcome, complications, and recurrence rate. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo) 41:371–381
9)

Stanišić M, Hald J, Rasmussen IA, Pripp AH, Ivanović J, Kolstad F, Sundseth J, Züchner M, Lindegaard KF (2013) Volume and densities of chronic subdural haematoma obtained from CT imaging as predictors of postoperative recurrence: a prospective study of 107 operated patients. Acta Neurochir 155:323–333
10)

Jack A, O’Kelly C, McDougall C, Max Findlay J. Predicting Recurrence after Chronic Subdural Haematoma Drainage. Can J Neurol Sci. 2015 Jan 5:1-6. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 25557536.
11)

Unterhofer C, Freyschlag CF, Thomé C, Ortler M. Opening the Internal Hematoma Membrane does not Alter the Recurrence Rate of Chronic Subdural Hematomas – A Prospective Randomized Trial. World Neurosurg. 2016 May 2. pii: S1878-8750(16)30210-8. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2016.04.081. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 27150644.
12)

Lee JY, Ebel H, Ernestus RI, Klug N. Various surgical treatments of chronic subdural hematoma and outcome in 172 patients: is membranectomy necessary? Surg Neurol. 2004 Jun;61(6):523-7; discussion 527-8. PubMed PMID: 15165784.
13)

Matsumoto K, Akagi K, Abekura M, Ryujin H, Ohkawa M, Iwasa N, Akiyama C. Recurrence factors for chronic subdural hematomas after burr-hole craniostomy and closed system drainage. Neurol Res. 1999 Apr;21(3):277-80. PubMed PMID: 10319336.
14)

Yamamoto H, Hirashima Y, Hamada H, Hayashi N, Origasa H, Endo S. Independent predictors of recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma: results of multivariate analysis performed using a logistic regression model. J Neurosurg. 2003 Jun;98(6):1217-21. PubMed PMID: 12816267.
15)

Pang CH, Lee SE, Kim CH, Kim JE, Kang HS, Park CK, Paek SH, Kim CH, Jahng TA, Kim JW, Kim YH, Kim DG, Chung CK, Jung HW, Yoo H. Acute intracranial bleeding and recurrence after bur hole craniostomy for chronic subdural hematoma. J Neurosurg. 2015 Jul;123(1):65-74. doi: 10.3171/2014.12.JNS141189. Epub 2015 Feb 13. PubMed PMID: 25679282.
16)

Balser D, Rodgers SD, Johnson B, Shi C, Tabak E, Samadani U. Evolving management of symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma: experience of a single institution and review of the literature. Neurol Res. 2013 Apr;35(3):233-42. doi: 10.1179/1743132813Y.0000000166. Review. PubMed PMID: 23485050.
17)

Xu FF, Chen JH, Leung GK, Hao SY, Xu L, Hou ZG, Mao X, Shi GZ, Li JS, Liu BY. Quantitative computer tomography analysis of post-operative subdural fluid volume predicts recurrence of chronic subdural haematoma. Brain Inj. 2014;28(8):1121-6. doi: 10.3109/02699052.2014.910702. Epub 2014 May 6. PubMed PMID: 24801643.
18)

Pripp AH, Stanišić M. The Correlation between Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines in Chronic Subdural Hematoma Patients Assessed with Factor Analysis. PLoS One. 2014 Feb 27;9(2):e90149. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090149. eCollection 2014. PubMed PMID: 24587250.
19)

Adachi A, Higuchi Y, Fujikawa A, Machida T, Sueyoshi S, Harigaya K, Ono J, Saeki N. Risk factors in chronic subdural hematoma: comparison of irrigation with artificial cerebrospinal fluid and normal saline in a cohort analysis. PLoS One. 2014 Aug 4;9(8):e103703. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0103703. eCollection 2014. PubMed PMID: 25089621; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4121178.
20)

Desai VR, Scranton RA, Britz GW. Management of Recurrent Subdural Hematomas. Neurosurg Clin N Am. 2017 Apr;28(2):279-286. doi: 10.1016/j.nec.2016.11.010. Epub 2017 Jan 4. Review. PubMed PMID: 28325462.
21)

Matsumoto H, Hanayama H, Okada T, Sakurai Y, Minami H, Masuda A, Tominaga S, Miyaji K, Yamaura I, Yoshida Y, Yoshida K. Clinical investigation of refractory chronic subdural hematoma: a comparison of clinical factors between single and repeated recurrences. World Neurosurg. 2017 Aug 24. pii: S1878-8750(17)31402-X. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.08.101. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28844917.
22)

Sato M, Iwatsuki K, Akiyama C, Masana Y, Yoshimine T, Hayakawa T. [Use of Ommaya CSF reservoir for refractory chronic subdural hematoma]. No Shinkei Geka. 1999 Apr;27(4):323-8. Japanese. PubMed PMID: 10347846.
23)

Sato M, Iwatsuki K, Akiyama C, Kumura E, Yoshimine T. Implantation of a reservoir for refractory chronic subdural hematoma. Neurosurgery. 2001 Jun;48(6):1297-301. PubMed PMID: 11383733.
24)

Laumer R. Implantation of a reservoir for refractory chronic subdural hematoma. Neurosurgery. 2002 Mar;50(3):672. PubMed PMID: 11841742.
25)

Misra M, Salazar JL, Bloom DM. Subdural-peritoneal shunt: treatment for bilateral chronic subdural hematoma. Surg Neurol. 1996 Oct;46(4):378-83. PubMed PMID: 8876720.
26)

Mandai S, Sakurai M, Matsumoto Y. Middle meningeal artery embolization for refractory chronic subdural hematoma. Case report. J Neurosurg. 2000 Oct;93(4):686-8. PubMed PMID: 11014549.
27)

Takahashi K, Muraoka K, Sugiura T, Maeda Y, Mandai S, Gohda Y, Kawauchi M, Matsumoto Y. [Middle meningeal artery embolization for refractory chronic subdural hematoma: 3 case reports]. No Shinkei Geka. 2002 May;30(5):535-9. Japanese. PubMed PMID: 11993178.
28)

Hirai S, Ono J, Odaki M, Serizawa T, Nagano O. Embolization of the Middle Meningeal Artery for Refractory Chronic Subdural Haematoma. Usefulness for Patients under Anticoagulant Therapy. Interv Neuroradiol. 2004 Dec 24;10 Suppl 2:101-4. Epub 2008 May 15. PubMed PMID: 20587257; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3522210.
29)

Tsukamoto Y, Oishi M, Shinbo J, Fujii Y. Transarterial embolisation for refractory bilateral chronic subdural hematomas in a case with dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2011 May;153(5):1145-7. doi: 10.1007/s00701-010-0891-3. Epub 2010 Dec 2. PubMed PMID: 21125409.
30)

Mino M, Nishimura S, Hori E, Kohama M, Yonezawa S, Midorikawa H, Kaimori M, Tanaka T, Nishijima M. Efficacy of middle meningeal artery embolization in the treatment of refractory chronic subdural hematoma. Surg Neurol Int. 2010 Dec 13;1:78. doi: 10.4103/2152-7806.73801. PubMed PMID: 21206540; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3011107.
31)

Hashimoto T, Ohashi T, Watanabe D, Koyama S, Namatame H, Izawa H, Haraoka R, Okada H, Ichimasu N, Akimoto J, Haraoka J. Usefulness of embolization of the middle meningeal artery for refractory chronic subdural hematomas. Surg Neurol Int. 2013 Aug 19;4:104. doi: 10.4103/2152-7806.116679. eCollection 2013. PubMed PMID: 24032079; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3766342.
32)

Kim E. Embolization Therapy for Refractory Hemorrhage in Patients with Chronic Subdural Hematomas. World Neurosurg. 2017 May;101:520-527. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.02.070. Epub 2017 Feb 27. PubMed PMID: 28249828.
33)

Chihara H, Imamura H, Ogura T, Adachi H, Imai Y, Sakai N. Recurrence of a Refractory Chronic Subdural Hematoma after Middle Meningeal Artery Embolization That Required Craniotomy. NMC Case Rep J. 2014 May 9;1(1):1-5. doi: 10.2176/nmccrj.2013-0343. eCollection 2014 Oct. PubMed PMID: 28663942; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5364934.

Brain metastases recurrence diagnosis

Brain metastases recurrence diagnosis

It is difficult to differentiate local brain metastases recurrence from radiation induced-changes in case of suspicious contrast enhancement. New advanced MRI techniques (perfusion and spectrometry) and Amino Acid Positron Emission tomography allow to be more accurate and could avoid a stereotactic biopsy for histological assessment, the only reliable but invasive method.

Whereas positron emission tomography (PET) with the widely used 18F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) has low diagnostic accuracy after SRS, the use of radiolabelled amino acids or amino acid analogues such as L-methyl-11C-methionine (11C-MET) and O-(2-18F-Fluoroethyl)-L-Tyrosine (18F-FET) reaches sensitivity and specificity values in the range of 78 and 100 % rendering especially 18F-FET a highly reliable tracer in glioma imaging.


In patients with MRI-suspected tumor recurrence after focused high dose radiotherapy, 18F-FET PET has a high sensitivity and specificity for the differentiation of vital tumor tissue and radiation-induced lesions 1).


Tran et al. performed a feasibility study to prospectively evaluate 11C methionine positron emission tomography and11C PBR28 positron emission tomography in 5 patients with 7 previously SRS-treated brain metastases demonstrating regrowth to differentiate tumor regrowth (TR) from radiation necrosis (RN).

Sequential imaging with dual tracers was well-tolerated. [11C]methionine was accurate for detecting pathologically confirmed TR in 7/7 lesions, whereas [11C]PBR28 was only accurate in 3/7 lesions. Tumor PBRTSPO expression was elevated in both melanoma and lung cancer cells, contributing to lack of specificity of [11C]PBR28-PET.

Sequential use of PET tracers is safe and effective. [11C]Methionine was a reliable TR marker, but [11C]PBR28 was not a reliable marker of RN. Studies are needed to determine the causes of post-radiation inflammation and identify specific markers of RN to improve diagnostic imaging 2).

The multimodal MRI has greatly contributed to refine the differential diagnosis between tumour recurrence and radionecrosis, which remains difficult. The FDG PET is helpful, in favour of the diagnosis of local tumour recurrence when a hypermetabolic lesion is found. Others tracers (such as carbon 11 or a fluoride isotope) deserve interest but are not available in all centres. Stereotactic biopsy should be discussed if any doubt remains 3).

An increase in FLAIR signal of the fluid within the resection cavity might be a highly specific and early sign of local tumor recurrence/tumor progression also for brain metastases. 4).


1)

Romagna A, Unterrainer M, Schmid-Tannwald C, Brendel M, Tonn JC, Nachbichler SB, Muacevic A, Bartenstein P, Kreth FW, Albert NL. Suspected recurrence of brain metastases after focused high dose radiotherapy: can [18F]FET- PET overcome diagnostic uncertainties? Radiat Oncol. 2016 Oct 21;11(1):139. doi: 10.1186/s13014-016-0713-8. PMID: 27769279; PMCID: PMC5073742.
2)

Tran TT, Gallezot JD, Jilaveanu LB, Zito C, Turcu G, Lim K, Nabulsi N, Huang H, Huttner A, Kluger HM, Chiang VL, Carson R. [11C]Methionine and [11C]PBR28 as PET Imaging Tracers to Differentiate Metastatic Tumor Recurrence or Radiation Necrosis. Mol Imaging. 2020 Jan-Dec;19:1536012120968669. doi: 10.1177/1536012120968669. PMID: 33147119.
3)

Patsouris A, Augereau P, Tanguy JY, Morel O, Menei P, Rousseau A, Paumier A. [Differentiation from local tumour recurrence and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of brain metastasis.]. Cancer Radiother. 2014 Jan 13. pii: S1278-3218(13)00444-7. doi: 10.1016/j.canrad.2013.10.013. [Epub ahead of print] French. PubMed PMID: 24433952.
4)

Bette S, Gempt J, Wiestler B, Huber T, Specht H, Meyer B, Zimmer C, Kirschke JS, Boeckh-Behrens T. Increase in FLAIR Signal of the Fluid Within the Resection Cavity as Early Recurrence Marker: Also Valid for Brain Metastases? Rofo. 2017 Jan;189(1):63-70. doi: 10.1055/s-0042-119686. PubMed PMID: 28002859.

Middle meningeal artery embolization for chronic subdural hematoma

Middle meningeal artery embolization for chronic subdural hematoma

middlemeningealartery.jpg

Chronic subdural hematoma is fundamentally a disorder of the meningeal blood vessels.

Embolization of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) has recently been proposed as a curative treatment for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH), but evidence for the indication and timing is not definitive.

Fiorella and Arthur reviewed the potential role for the endovascular management of cSDH within the context of a discussion of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and conventional management of this disease 1).

Trials

Systematic Reviews

The goal of a study was to review the evidence on MMAE in cSDH to assess its safety, feasibility, indications and efficacy. We performed a systematic review of the literature according to PRISMA guidelines using multiple electronic databases. Our search yielded a total of 18 original articles from which data were extracted. A total of 190 patients underwent MMAE from which 81.3% were symptomatic cSDH. Over half (52.3%) of the described population were undergoing antithrombotic therapy. Most (83%) procedures used polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles and no complications were reported regarding the embolization procedures. Although the definition of resolution varied among authors, cSDH resolution was reported in 96.8% of cases. MMAE is a feasible technique for cSDH, but the current body of evidence does not yet support its use as a standard treatment. Further studies with a higher level of evidence are necessary before MMAE can be formally recommended 2).


Three double-arm studies comparing embolization and conventional surgery groups and 6 single-arm case series were identified and analyzed. Hematoma recurrence rate was significantly lower in the embolization group compared with conventional treatment group (2.1% vs. 27.7%; odds ratio = 0.087; 95% confidence interval, 0.026-0.292; P < 0.001; I2 = 0%); surgical complication rates were similar between groups (2.1% vs. 4.4%; odds ratio = 0.563; 95% confidence interval, 0.107-2.96; P = 0.497; I2 = 27.5%). Number of patients with modified Rankin Scale score >2 in the embolization (12.5%) versus conventional treatment (9.1%) group showed no statistical difference (P = 0.689). A composite hematoma recurrence rate of 3.6% was found after summing the 6 case series. Composite recurrence and complication rates in the embolization cohorts of the double-arm studies and the case series were lower than literature values for conventional surgical treatments.

MMA embolization is a promising treatment for chronic subdural hematoma. Future randomized clinical trials are needed 3).

Case series

A review was registered with the International prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO). Public/Publisher Medline (PubMed), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE) and the Cochrane Library were searched using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms for MMA embolization and CSDH from January 2000 through November 2018. All articles in the English language literature describing MMA embolization for CSDH were included, irrespective of study design. Consecutive patients who underwent MMA embolization at our hospital from January 2017 through June 2018 comprised our clinical experience.

Fifteen studies with 193 procedures were included in the review. Ninety-five (49.2%) cases involved primary MMA embolization; 88(45.6%) embolization for recurrent CSDH, and 10(5.2%) were performed for prophylaxis after surgical evacuation. Recurrence after MMA embolization requiring further treatment occurred in 7(3.6%) cases. All other patients had symptomatic relief with no further recurrence. No procedure-related complications were reported. Polyvinyl alcohol was the most commonly used material. Our series included 8 patients treated with Onyx (Medtronic). All had symptom relief and significant reduction in hematoma size; no recurrences or procedure-related complications were observed 4).


Nakagawa et al., retrospectively assessed data from 381 consecutive patients who underwent burr hole irrigation for CSDH between 2009 and 2017. Recurrent symptomatic ipsilateral CSDH in 71 (18%) patients was treated by a second burr-hole irrigation and 20 of them had a further symptomatic CSDH recurrence thereafter. Those with persistent ipsilateral CSDH recurrence were treated by MMA embolization. Before the MMA embolization procedures, the amount of hematoma membrane enhancement determined using superselective MMA angiography-DynaCT imaging was classified into three stages.

Embolization of the MMA proceeded without perioperative complications or further CSDH recurrence. The interval between recurrence and the amount of hematoma membrane enhancement significantly correlated (first to second and second to third treatments: p = 0.012 and p = 0.017, respectively). The frequency of bilateral CSDH was significantly higher and the recurrence interval between the first and second treatments was significantly shorter in repeated recurrences group compared with recurrence group (p = 0.023 and p = 0.006, respectively).

Repeatedly recurrent CSDH can be safely treated and cured by MMA embolization. Hematoma membrane enhancement pattern using DynaCT images can predict repeated recurrences CSDH. 5)


Five patients with symptomatic chronic SDHs underwent MMA embolization using PVA microparticles. Size of SDH was recorded in maximum diameter and total volume.

Four patients underwent unilateral and 1 underwent bilateral MMA embolization successfully. All cases had significant reduction in total volume of SDH at longest follow-up scan: 81.4 to 13.8 cc (7 wk), 48.5 to 8.7 cc (3 wk), 31.7 and 88 to 0 and 17 cc (14 wk, bilateral), 79.3 to 24.2 cc (8 wk), and 53.5 to 0 cc (6 wk). All patients had symptomatic relief with no complications. Histologic analysis of the chronic SDH membrane in a separate patient that required surgery revealed rich neovascularization with many capillaries and few small arterioles.

MMA embolization could present a minimally invasive and low-risk initial treatment alternative to surgery for symptomatic chronic SDH when clinically appropriate 6).


MMA embolization was performed using angiography, selective microcatheterization of the MMA, and infusion of polyvinyl alcohol particles. Outcomes were assessed clinically and with interval imaging studies at 1 d, 2 wk, and 6 wk postprocedure, and additional intervals as indicated.

MMA embolization was performed successfully on 60 total SDHs in 49 patients. This includes upfront treatment for new (not previously treated) SDH in 42, for recurrence in 8, and prophylaxis (soon after surgical evacuation) in 10. There were 3 mortalities (unrelated to the procedure), and no procedural complications. Of the 50 nonprophylactic cases, there were 4 (8.9%) cases of recurrence requiring surgical evacuation, and 31 (68.9%) that had resolution or reduction in size >50% of SDH at longest follow-up. Overall, 41 (91.1%) were stable or decreased in size and able to avoid surgery.

MMA embolization may represent a minimally-invasive alternative to surgery for new or recurrent chronic SDH, or as prophylaxis to reduce the risk of recurrence after surgery. Given our encouraging results with a 91% long-term success rate, a large scale clinical trial is warranted 7).


Link TW, Schwarz JT, Paine SM, Kamel H, Knopman J. Middle Meningeal Artery Embolization for Recurrent Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Case Series. World Neurosurg. 2018 Oct;118:e570-e574. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2018.06.241. Epub 2018 Jul 6. PubMed PMID: 30257310.


Five patients with symptomatic chronic SDHs underwent MMA embolization using PVA microparticles at our institution. Size of SDH was recorded in maximum diameter and total volume.

Four patients underwent unilateral and 1 underwent bilateral MMA embolization successfully. All cases had significant reduction in total volume of SDH at longest follow-up scan: 81.4 to 13.8 cc (7 wk), 48.5 to 8.7 cc (3 wk), 31.7 and 88 to 0 and 17 cc (14 wk, bilateral), 79.3 to 24.2 cc (8 wk), and 53.5 to 0 cc (6 wk). All patients had symptomatic relief with no complications. Histologic analysis of the chronic SDH membrane in a separate patient that required surgery revealed rich neovascularization with many capillaries and few small arterioles.

MMA embolization could present a minimally invasive and low-risk initial treatment alternative to surgery for symptomatic chronic SDH when clinically appropriate 8).


Seventy-two prospectively enrolled patients with CSDH underwent MMA embolization (embolization group; as the sole treatment in 27 [37.5%] asymptomatic patients and with additional hematoma removal for symptom relief in 45 [62.5%] symptomatic patients). For comparison, 469 patients who underwent conventional treatment were included as a historical control group (conventional treatment group; close, nonsurgical follow-up in 67 [14.3%] and hematoma removal in 402 [85.7%] patients). Primary outcome was treatment failure defined as a composite of incomplete hematoma resolution (remaining or reaccumulated hematoma with thickness > 10 mm) or surgical rescue (hematoma removal for relief of symptoms that developed with continuous growth of initial or reaccumulated hematoma). Secondary outcomes included surgical rescue as a component of the primary outcome and treatment-related complication for safety measure. Six-month outcomes were compared between the study groups with logistic regression analysis. Results Spontaneous hematoma resolution was achieved in all of 27 asymptomatic patients undergoing embolization without direct hematoma removal. Hematoma reaccumulation occurred in one (2.2%) of 45 symptomatic patients receiving embolization with additional hematoma removal. Treatment failure rate in the embolization group was lower than in the conventional treatment group (one of 72 patients [1.4%] vs 129 of 469 patients [27.5%], respectively; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.056; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.011, 0.286; P = .001). Surgical rescue was less frequent in the embolization group (one of 72 patients [1.4%] vs 88 of 469 patients [18.8%]; adjusted OR, 0.094; 95% CI: 0.018, 0.488; P = .005). Treatment-related complication rate was not different between the two groups (0 of 72 patients vs 20 of 469 patients [4.3%]; adjusted OR, 0.145; 95% CI: 0.009, 2.469; P = .182). Conclusion MMA embolization has a positive therapeutic effect on CSDH and is more effective than conventional treatment 9).


Gobran Taha Alfotih reported 14 cases http://www.roneurosurgery.eu/atdoc/AlfotihGobran_Embolization.pdf

Case reports

A case of a 74-year-old male on aspirin with a history of recurrent symptomatic chronic right-sided subdural hematoma treated successfully with a SEPS and right middle meningeal artery embolization with poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) microparticles. The patient initially presented to the emergency department with headaches, difficulty walking, and left sided hemiparesis. CT Head showed a large chronic right-sided subdural hematoma measuring 2.7 cm thick with 1 cm of leftward shift. Patient underwent placement of a right-sided SEPS and the subdural hematoma decreased in size to 1.0 cm with 2 mm of leftward shift. The patient had resolution of headaches and neurological symptoms and was discharged home. Three months later, the patient returned to the emergency department with headache and left hand numbness. CT Head showed an acute on chronic right-sided subdural hematoma measuring 1.4 cm with 3 mm of leftward shift. Patient underwent right-sided SEPS placement. Repeat CT Head showed reduction in the subdural hematoma to 1.2 cm. The SEPS was removed and the patient had resolution of neurological symptoms. The patient then had a diagnostic cerebral angiogram with PVA microparticle embolization of the right middle meningeal artery. A SEPS was placed at the time of the angiogram to further reduce the size of the subdural hematoma.

Repeat CT Head after SEPS and middle meningeal artery embolization showed decrease in size of the subdural hematoma. Follow-up CT Head showed stability of the subdural hematoma and patient had no further neurological symptoms. Patient was discharged home.

Middle meningeal artery embolization is a useful endovascular technique for reducing the arterial supply to the membranes in chronic subdural hematomas. Middle meningeal artery embolization can reduce the recurrence rate of subdural hematomas 10).

References

1)

Fiorella D, Arthur AS. Middle meningeal artery embolization for the management of chronic subdural hematoma. J Neurointerv Surg. 2019 Feb 23. pii: neurintsurg-2019-014730. doi: 10.1136/neurintsurg-2019-014730. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PubMed PMID: 30798265.
2)

Court J, Touchette CJ, Iorio-Morin C, Westwick HJ, Belzile F, Effendi K. Embolization of the Middle meningeal artery in chronic subdural hematoma – A systematic review. Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2019 Aug 10;186:105464. doi: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2019.105464. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PubMed PMID: 31600604.
3)

Srivatsan A, Mohanty A, Nascimento FA, Hafeez MU, Srinivasan VM, Thomas A, Chen SR, Johnson JN, Kan P. Middle Meningeal Artery Embolization for Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review. World Neurosurg. 2019 Feb;122:613-619. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2018.11.167. Epub 2018 Nov 24. PubMed PMID: 30481628.
4)

Waqas M, Vakharia K, Weimer PV, Hashmi E, Davies JM, Siddiqui AH. Safety and Effectiveness of Embolization for Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Systematic Review and Case Series. World Neurosurg. 2019 Mar 13. pii: S1878-8750(19)30678-3. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.02.208. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PubMed PMID: 30878752.
5)

Nakagawa I, Park HS, Kotsugi M, Wada T, Takeshima Y, Matsuda R, Nishimura F, Yamada S, Motoyama Y, Park YS, Kichikawa K, Nakase H. Enhanced hematoma membrane on DynaCT images during middle meningeal artery embolization for persistently recurrent chronic subdural hematoma. World Neurosurg. 2019 Feb 27. pii: S1878-8750(19)30485-1. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2019.02.074. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30825631.
6) , 8)

Link TW, Boddu S, Marcus J, Rapoport BI, Lavi E, Knopman J. Middle Meningeal Artery Embolization as Treatment for Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Case Series. Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown). 2018 May 1;14(5):556-562. doi: 10.1093/ons/opx154. PubMed PMID: 28973653.
7)

Link TW, Boddu S, Paine SM, Kamel H, Knopman J. Middle Meningeal Artery Embolization for Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Series of 60 Cases. Neurosurgery. 2018 Nov 9. doi: 10.1093/neuros/nyy521. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 30418606.
9)

Ban SP, Hwang G, Byoun HS, Kim T, Lee SU, Bang JS, Han JH, Kim CY, Kwon OK, Oh CW. Middle Meningeal Artery Embolization for Chronic Subdural Hematoma. Radiology. 2018 Mar;286(3):992-999. doi: 10.1148/radiol.2017170053. Epub 2017 Oct 10. PubMed PMID: 29019449.
WhatsApp WhatsApp us
%d bloggers like this: