Book: Diagnostic Surgical Neuropathology by Location

Diagnostic Surgical Neuropathology by Location
By Kenneth B. Fallon

Diagnostic Surgical Neuropathology by Location
Price: $199.95
ADD TO SHOPPING CART
Diagnostic Surgical Neuropathology by Location, is a practical guide for all pathologists in their initial, real-time encounters with brain of spinal cord biopsies for the immediate rendering of an intraoperative diagnosis based on the squash preparations of frozen section. The book is organized with a heavy emphasis on neuroanatomic to neuropathologic relationships best defined as a given lesion’s location with regard to its contiguous macroscopic and microscopic environments. The demonstration of the lesion’s macroscopic environment would include corresponding radiographic images, diagrams, and photographs of applicable autopsy teaching specimens for comparison; the microscopic environment would be illustrated by photomicrographs expressly composed in ways to show lesions in relation to contiguous unaffected, non-diseased tissue. The chapters progress from the cranial-to-caudal segments of the neuraxis from brain to spinal cord, respectively. The topics to be included in this book consist of all lesions likely to be encountered in the course of intraoperative neuropathologic consultation; this would encompass both primary and metastatic (secondary) forms of CNS neoplasia, non-neoplastic CNS lesions (for example, demyelinative processes), and CNS infections.
* Introduces neuropathology via neuroanatomic context instead of type of tissue
* The focus on location supports better understanding of the neuropathologic study
* Introduces the benefits of squash preparations for intraoperative assessment of neuropathology specimens


Product Details

  • Original language: English
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 656 pages

Books sorted by Relevance

Practical Surgical Neuropathology: A Diagnostic Approach: A Volume in the Pattern Recognition Series, 2e 2nd Edition

Neuropathology: A Volume in the Series: Foundations in Diagnostic Pathology, 2eNov 30, 2011

Diagnostic Pathology: Neuropathology, 2eFeb 24, 2016

Developmental Neuropathology

Escourolle & Poirier’s Manual of Basic Neuropathology

Neuropathology: A Reference Text of CNS Pathology, 3e

Greenfield’s Neuropathology, Ninth Edition – Two Volume Set

Arachnoid Cysts: Clinical and Surgical Management

Arachnoid Cysts: Clinical and Surgical Management

Nov 3, 2017

by Knut Wester


List Price: $143.32
ADD TO SHOPPING CART

Arachnoid Cysts: Clinical and Surgical Management gives a broad and updated presentation of the condition, including symptomatology, diagnostics, management and treatment. The book covers the effects of surgical treatment on clinical symptoms and the effects cysts have on cognition, as well as cognitive improvement after surgical cyst decompression. This book is written for researchers, residents and clinical practitioners in clinical neuroscience, neurology, neurosurgery, neuroradiology and pediatrics.

  • Covers the symptomology and treatment of arachnoid cysts
  • Describes impaired cognition associated with arachnoid cysts
  • Identifies the advantages, disadvantages and results of different surgical approaches
  • Provides valuable information to researchers, residents and clinical practitioners in clinical neuroscience, neurology, neurosurgery, neuroradiology and pediatrics

Book: Complex Surgical Cases of the Limbic System

Complex Surgical Cases of the Limbic System
By Sepehr Sani

Complex Surgical Cases of the Limbic System

List Price: $90.00
ADD TO SHOPPING CART
The limbic system (also known as the paleomammalian brain) is a collection of brain structures located in the middle of the brain. It is not a discrete system itself but rather a collection of structures-anatomically related but varying greatly in function. The limbic system is the centre for emotional responsiveness, motivation, memory formation and integration, olfaction, and the mechanisms to keep ourselves safe (Neuropsychotherapist.com). This book is a guide to surgical procedures for the limbic system. Beginning with an overview of brain embryology and anatomy, each of the following sections covers surgical approaches for disorders in different parts of the limbic system. Procedures are explained in a step by step approach, with emphasis on anatomical markers and avoidance of complications. The final chapters discuss brain mapping during surgery, giant and unusual tumours, and vascular lesions. Authored by a team of highly experienced, Illinois and Wisconsin-based neurosurgeons, the book is enhanced by anatomical dissections, operative photographs and illustrations, and includes a DVD ROM demonstrating surgical procedures. Key points * Guide to surgical procedures for the limbic system * Step by step approach with emphasis on anatomical markers and avoidance of complications * Highly experienced, Illinois and Wisconsin-based author team * Includes DVD ROM demonstrating surgical procedures


Product Details

  • Original language: English
  • Dimensions: 9.50″ h x .0″ w x 6.30″ l,
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 180 pages

Editorial Reviews

About the Author
Sepehr Sani MD Assistant Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, Rush University Medical Centre, Chicago, IL, USA Mustafa K Baskaya MD Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine, Madison, WI, USA Richard W Byrne MD Chairman, Department of Neurosurgery, Rush University Medical Centre, Chicago, IL, USA

Surgical Approaches to the Skull Base – Hands-on dissection course with 3-D lectures

Surgical Approaches to the Skull Base – Hands-on dissection course with 3-D lectures

June 28 — July 1

Arezzo, Italy
Course Directors: Antonio Bernardo, Paolo Perrini.

Faculty:
Vinko V Dolenc
Mario Sanna
Marco Cenzato
Renato J Galzio
Francesco Tomasello

Please click HERE for full details

Acute Ischemic Stroke: Medical, Endovascular, and Surgical Techniques

Acute Ischemic Stroke: Medical, Endovascular, and Surgical Techniques

Acute Ischemic Stroke: Medical, Endovascular, and Surgical Techniques

List Price: $249.00
ADD TO SHOPPING CART
This book approaches the topic of management of acute ischemic stroke in an interdisciplinary manner, explaining how best to utilize the methods currently available for medical, surgical, and endovascular care. After an opening section on basics such as pathophysiology, radiological assessment, and pathology, comprehensive and up-to-date information is provided on each of the available therapies, techniques, and practices. Special attention is paid to recent advances in neurointerventional and neurosurgical procedures, with clear description of important technical details.The book includes plentiful high-quality case illustrations and a wealth of practical information that will prove of value in emergency rooms, angiography suites, operating rooms, and intensive care units. It will aid not only neurologists, neurointerventionists, and neurosurgeons, but also all others who are involved in the management of acute ischemic stroke, from radiologists and emergency physicians to healthcare providers.


Product Details

  • Published on: 2017-03-23
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: 10.00″ h x .0″ w x 7.00″ l, .0 pounds
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 270 pages

Neurosurgery and ACS National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP)


VP shunts were placed in 3,984 patients either as an initial placement (n = 1,093) or as a revision (n = 2,891). Compared to the initial-placement group, the revision group was significantly more likely to experience shunt failure (14 vs. 8%, p < 0.0001). In the initial-placement group, congenital hydrocephalus was independently associated with shunt failure (OR 1.83; 95% CI 1.01-3.31, p = 0.047). In the revision group, cardiac risk factors (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.00-1.90, p = 0.047), a chronic history of seizures (OR 1.33; 95% CI 1.04-1.71, p = 0.022), and a history of neuromuscular disease (OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.41-0.90, p = 0.014) were independently associated with shunt failure.
Identifying the factors associated with VP shunt failure may allow the development of interventions to decrease failures. Further refinement of the collected variables in the ACS National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) Pediatric specific to neurosurgical procedures is necessary to identify modifiable risk factors 1).


Cote et al., performed a search of the ACS National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database for all patients undergoing operations with a neurosurgeon from 2006 to 2013. They analyzed demographics, past medical history, and post-operative respiratory failure, defined as unplanned intubation and/or ventilator dependence for more than 48 h post-operatively.
Of 94,621 NSQIP-reported neurosurgical patients from 2006 to 2013, 2325 (2.5 %) developed post-operative respiratory failure. Of these patients, 1270 (54.6 %) were male, with an overall mean age of 60.59 years; 571 (24.56 %) were current smokers and 756 (32.52 %) were ventilator-dependent. Past medical history included dyspnea in 204 patients (8.8 %), COPD in 198 (8.5 %), and congestive heart failure in 66 (2.8 %). The rate of post-operative respiratory failure decreased from 4.1 % in 2006 to 2.1 % in 2013 (p < 0.001). Of the 2325 patients with respiratory failure, 1061 (45.6 %) underwent unplanned intubation post-operatively and 1900 (81.7 %) were ventilator-dependent for more than 48 h. The rate of both unplanned intubation (p < 0.001) and ventilator dependence (p < 0.001) decreased significantly from 2006 to 2013. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that significant risk factors for respiratory failure included inpatient status (p < 0.001, OR = 0.165), age (p < 0.001, OR = 1.014), diabetes (p = 0.001, OR = 1.489), functional dependence prior to surgery (p < 0.001, OR = 2.081), ventilator dependence (p < 0.001, OR = 10.304), hypertension requiring medication (p = 0.005, OR = 1.287), impaired sensorium (p < 0.001, OR = 2.054), CVA/stroke with or without neurological deficit (p < 0.001, OR = 2.662; p = 0.002, OR = 1.816), systemic sepsis (p < 0.001, OR = 1.916), prior operation within 30 days (p = 0.026, OR = 1.439), and operation type (cranial relative to spine, p < 0.001, OR = 4.344).
Based on the NSQIP database, risk factors for respiratory failure after neurosurgery include pre-operative ventilator dependence, alcohol use, functional dependence prior to surgery, stroke, and recent operation. The overall rate of respiratory failure decreased from 4.1 % in 2006 to 2.1 % in 2013 according to these data 2).


Data from adult patients who underwent surgery for spinal tumors (2011-2014) were extracted from the prospective National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) registry. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate predictors of reoperation, readmission, and major complications (death, neurological, cardiopulmonary, venous thromboembolism [VTE], surgical site infection [SSI], and sepsis). Variables screened included patient age, sex, tumor location, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical classification, preoperative functional status, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, case urgency, and operative time. Additional variables that were evaluated when analyzing readmission included complications during the surgical hospitalization, hospital length of stay (LOS), and discharge disposition.
Among the 2207 patients evaluated, 51.4% had extradural tumors, 36.4% had intradural extramedullary tumors, and 12.3% had intramedullary tumors. By spinal level, 20.7% were cervical lesions, 47.4% were thoracic lesions, 29.1% were lumbar lesions, and 2.8% were sacral lesions. Readmission occurred in 10.2% of patients at a median of 18 days (interquartile range [IQR] 12-23 days); the most common reasons for readmission were SSIs (23.7%), systemic infections (17.8%), VTE (12.7%), and CNS complications (11.9%). Predictors of readmission were comorbidities (dyspnea, hypertension, and anemia), disseminated cancer, preoperative steroid use, and an extended hospitalization. Reoperation occurred in 5.3% of patients at a median of 13 days (IQR 8-20 days) postoperatively and was associated with preoperative steroid use and ASA Class 4-5 designation. Major complications occurred in 14.4% of patients: the most common complications and their median time to occurrence were VTE (4.5%) at 9 days (IQR 4-19 days) postoperatively, SSIs (3.6%) at 18 days (IQR 14-25 days), and sepsis (2.9%) at 13 days (IQR 7-21 days). Predictors of major complications included dependent functional status, emergency case status, male sex, comorbidities (dyspnea, bleeding disorders, preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome, preoperative leukocytosis), and ASA Class 3-5 designation (p < 0.05). The median hospital LOS was 5 days (IQR 3-9 days), the 30-day mortality rate was 3.3%, and the median time to death was 20 days (IQR 12.5-26 days).
In a ACS National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis, 10.2% of patients undergoing surgery for spinal tumors were readmitted within 30 days, 5.3% underwent a reoperation, and 14.4% experienced a major complication. The most common complications were SSIs, systemic infections, and VTE, which often occurred late (after discharge from the surgical hospitalization). Patients were primarily readmitted for new complications that developed following discharge rather than exacerbation of complications from the surgical hospital stay. The strongest predictors of adverse events were comorbidities, preoperative steroid use, and higher ASA score. These models can be used by surgeons to risk-stratify patients preoperatively and identify those who may benefit from increased surveillance following hospital discharge 3).


Using the American College of Surgeons’ National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) dataset, a retrospective analysis of the complications experienced by patients that underwent surgical management of a UIA between the years of 2007 and 2013. The primary outcomes of interest were mortality within the 30-day perioperative period and adverse discharge disposition to a location other than home. Predictors of morbidity and mortality were elucidated using multivariable logistic regression analyses controlling for available patient demographic, comorbidity, and operative characteristics.
662 patients were identified in the ACS-NSQIP dataset for operative management of an unruptured aneurysm. The observed rates of 30-day mortality and adverse discharge disposition were 2.27% and 19.47%, respectively. A hundred and eight (16.31%) patients developed at least one major complication. On multivariable analysis, death within 30days was significantly associated with increased operative time (OR 1.005 per minute, 95% CI 1.002-1.008) and chronic preoperative corticosteroid use (OR 28.4, 95% CI 1.68-480.42), whereas major complication development was associated with increased operative time (OR 1.004 per minute, 95% CI 1.002-1.006), age (OR 1.017 per year, 95% CI 1-1.034), preoperative dependency (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.16-9.40) and diabetes mellitus (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.45-5.75). Lastly, increasing age (OR 1.017 per year, 95% CI 1-1.034) as well as ASA Class 3 (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.08-2.77) and 4 (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.1-4.72) were independent predictors of discharge to a location other than home.
The study yields morbidity and mortality benchmarks for UIA surgery in a representative, national surgical registry. It will hopefully aid in recognizing those patients at greater risk for postoperative complications following surgical management, leading to appropriate changes in treatment strategies for this selected group of patients 4).


2351 patients underwent peripheral nerve surgery, 120 complications were identified in 100 patients (4.25%), and 103 patients (4.38%) received nerve grafting. Thirty-one (1.95%) of the 1593 patients underwent unplanned readmission. Nerve grafting procedures had no association with postoperative complications and unplanned readmission rates. Patients who experienced an inpatient procedure (OR= 2.54, P<0.001), a longer operative time (OR= 1.00, P<0.001) and worse wound classifications (OR= 1.83, P<0.001) all had increased odds of postoperative complications. An inpatient procedure (OR= 2.74, P=0.014) and any complications (OR= 24.43, P<0.001) were significantly associated with unplanned readmission.
The study confirms that peripheral nerve surgery and nerve graft procedures can be safely performed with low complication risks and low unplanned readmission rates. We also identified the risks associated with perioperative adverse outcomes, and these data may be used as an adjunct for risk stratification for patients under consideration for peripheral nerve surgery. This approach may enable the improved targeting of the most costly and harmful complications of preventive measures 5).

1) Gonzalez DO, Mahida JB, Asti L, Ambeba EJ, Kenney B, Governale L, Deans KJ, Minneci PC. Predictors of Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Failure in Children Undergoing Initial Placement or Revision. Pediatr Neurosurg. 2017;52(1):6-12. PubMed PMID: 27490129.
2) Cote DJ, Karhade AV, Burke WT, Larsen AM, Smith TR. Risk factors for post-operative respiratory failure among 94,621 neurosurgical patients from 2006 to 2013: a NSQIP analysis. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2016 Sep;158(9):1639-45. doi: 10.1007/s00701-016-2871-8. Epub 2016 Jun 23. PubMed PMID: 27339268.
3) Karhade AV, Vasudeva VS, Dasenbrock HH, Lu Y, Gormley WB, Groff MW, Chi JH, Smith TR. Thirty-day readmission and reoperation after surgery for spinal tumors: a National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis. Neurosurg Focus. 2016 Aug;41(2):E5. doi: 10.3171/2016.5.FOCUS16168. PubMed PMID: 27476847.
4) Kerezoudis P, McCutcheon BA, Murphy M, Rayan T, Gilder H, Rinaldo L, Shepherd D, Maloney PR, Hirshman BR, Carter BS, Bydon M, Meyer F, Lanzino G. Predictors of 30-day perioperative morbidity and mortality of unruptured intracranial aneurysm surgery. Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 2016 Oct;149:75-80. doi: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2016.07.027. Epub 2016 Jul 27. PubMed PMID: 27490305.
5) Hu K, Zhang T, Hutter MM, Xu W, Williams ZM. Thirty-Day Perioperative Adverse Outcomes Following Peripheral Nerve Surgery: An Analysis of 2351 Patients in the ACS NSQIP Database. World Neurosurg. 2016 Jul 16. pii: S1878-8750(16)30545-9. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2016.07.023. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 27436210.

Surgical neurology international: November 2016

Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease prior to L-dopa treatment: A case report
Deep brain stimulation of a patient with psychogenic movement disorder
Pretreatment clinical prognostic factors for brain metastases from breast cancer treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery
Subthalamus stimulation in Parkinson disease: Accounting for the bilaterality of contacts.
Ultra-extended euthermic pulsed radiofrequency for the treatment of ophthalmic neuralgia: A case report with elaboration of a new technique

WhatsApp WhatsApp us
%d bloggers like this: