Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Preoperative Assessment and Surgical Treatment

Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Preoperative Assessment and Surgical Treatment

by Oguz Cataltepe (Author), George Jallo (Author)

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The definitive guide to surgical management of epilepsy in pediatric patients

This fully revised and updated second edition of Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery, edited by internationally renowned pediatric neurosurgeons and epilepsy surgery experts Oğuz Çataltepe and George Jallo, fills a void in the literature, encompassing the full spectrum of topics related to the surgical treatment of intractable epilepsy and seizures in children. The prodigiously illustrated book and its accompanying videos feature contributions from distinguished specialists in several different countries across a wide range of disciplines.

From epidemiology, genetics, pathology, preoperative electrophysiological assessment and neuroimaging to state-of-the-art surgical approaches, this remarkable resource covers the full depth and breadth of surgical management of pediatric epilepsy. Topics include awake anesthesia, intracranial stimulation and mapping techniques, temporal and extratemporal epilepsy surgery techniques, insular, multilobar and hemispheric surgery approaches, and diverse disconnection, neuromodulation, and ablative procedures. Insights are provided on postoperative issues including seizure control, neuropsychological and psychosocial outcomes, surgical failure and re-operation, and much more.

Key Features

A review of topographic anatomy of the cerebral cortex and white matter with numerous illustrations provides enhanced understanding of eloquent anatomy. Discussion of cutting-edge techniques such as stereo-electroencephalography, multi-modality imaging and tractography, endoscopic and laser ablation approaches in hypothalamic hamartomas, peri-insular quadrantotomy, and various hemispherotomy approaches. Overview of common cortical stimulation and mapping techniques including magnetic and electrical stimulation modalities, functional MRI, and the WADA test. 13 videos demonstrate seizure semiology, stimulation, awake surgery, hemispherotomy, amygdalohippocampectomy, and endoscopic corpus callosotomy. This state-of-the-art resource is a must-have for epilepsy surgeons and epileptologists. It will also greatly benefit neurosurgeons, neurologists, clinical neuropsychologists, electrophysiologists, neuroradiologists, residents, fellows, and medical students involved in the assessment and surgical management of epilepsy in pediatric patients.

This book includes complimentary access to a digital copy on https://medone.thieme.com.

Cerebral cavernous malformation treatment

Cerebral cavernous malformation treatment

see Intracranial cavernous malformation surgery.


There have been few comparative studys of microsurgical excision vs conservative treatment of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) and none of them has reliably demonstrated a statistically and clinically significant difference.

A prospective, population-based study to identify and independently validate definite cerebral cavernous malformation diagnoses first made in 1999-2003 in Scottish adult residents, used multiple sources of prospective follow-up to assess adults’ dependence and to identify and independently validate outcome events.

Moultrie et al., used univariate and multivariable survival analyses to test the influence of CCM excision on outcome, adjusted for prognostic factors and baseline imbalances.

Of 134 adults, 25 underwent CCM excision; these adults were younger (34 vs 43 years at diagnosis, p = 0.004) and more likely to present with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or focal neurological deficit than adults managed conservatively (48% vs 26%; odds ratio 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-6.5). During 5 years of follow-up, CCM excision was associated with a deterioration to an Oxford Handicap Scale score 2-6 sustained over at least 2 successive years (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.3) and the occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage or new focal neurologic deficit (adjusted HR 3.6, 95% CI 1.3-10.0).

CCM excision was associated with worse outcomes over 5 years compared to conservative management. Long-term follow-up will determine whether this difference is sustained over patients’ lifetimes. Meanwhile, a randomized controlled trial appears justified.

CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class III evidence that CCM excision worsens short-term disability scores and increases the risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and new focal neurologic deficits 1).


Antithrombotic therapy use is associated with a lower risk of intracranial haemorrhage or focal neurological deficit from cerebral cavernous malformations than avoidance of antithrombotic therapy. These findings provide reassurance about safety for clinical practice and require further investigation in a randomised controlled trial 2).

References

1)

Moultrie F, Horne MA, Josephson CB, Hall JM, Counsell CE, Bhattacharya JJ, Papanastassiou V, Sellar RJ, Warlow CP, Murray GD, Al-Shahi Salman R; Scottish Audit of Intracranial Vascular Malformations (SAIVMs) steering committee and collaborators. Outcome after surgical or conservative management of cerebral cavernous malformations. Neurology. 2014 Aug 12;83(7):582-9. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000000684. Epub 2014 Jul 3. PubMed PMID: 24994841.
2)

Zuurbier SM, Hickman CR, Tolias CS, Rinkel LA, Leyrer R, Flemming KD, Bervini D, Lanzino G, Wityk RJ, Schneble HM, Sure U, Al-Shahi Salman R; Scottish Audit of Intracranial Vascular Malformations Steering Committee. Long-term antithrombotic therapy and risk of intracranial haemorrhage from cerebral cavernous malformations: a population-based cohort study, systematic review, and meta-analysis. Lancet Neurol. 2019 Aug 6. pii: S1474-4422(19)30231-5. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(19)30231-5. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31401075.

Spinal cord hemangioblastoma treatment

Spinal cord hemangioblastoma treatment

Although radiosurgery has been used to treat multiple hemangioblastoma, particularly in the cerebellum, complete microsurgical removal is the treatment of choice for spinal cord hemangioblastoma 1).

Partial resection or biopsy may cause postoperative bleeding and should therefore not be performed. Bleeding during dissection, due to the vascularity of HBs, increases the risk of adverse events.

minimally invasive approach for the resection of selected spinal hemangioblastomas is safe and allows complete tumor resection with good clinical results in experienced hands 2).


They are almost always associated with a syrinx or significant edema.

Cases associated with edema and syrinx are more space-occupying than those only with solid part of the tumor. Consequently, the mass effect producing neurological symptoms derives from the cyst rather than the tumor itself. On the removal of hemangioblastomas in association with a syrinx, the syrinx is spontaneously opened and always stops growing and usually regresses in size. Thus, the additional opening of the syrinx or surgical removal of the syrinx is not necessary 3).

Preceding Embolization

Although some investigators recommend preoperative embolization, 4) 5) in the series of Harati et al. it was usually not necessary to achieve complete resection 6). This is in concordance to several other series so that preoperative embolization is generally not recommended 7) 8) 9) 10) 11). To prevent intraoperative bleeding in selected cases, temporary artery occlusion was performed. This technique is described in detail by Clark et al.12).

Fluorescent dye

As vascular tumors, intramedullary hemangioblastomas are associated with significant intraoperative blood loss, making them particularly challenging clinical entities. The use of intraoperative indocyanine green or other fluorescent dyes has previously been described to avoid breaching the tumor capsule, but improved surgical outcomes may result from identifying and ligating the feeder arteries and arterialized draining veins.

Molina et al. presented a written and media illustration of a technique for intraoperative indocyanine green use in the en bloc resection of intramedullary hemangioblastoma 13).

Radiosurgery

Cyberknife radiosurgery has proven to be safe in the treatment of spinal HBs 14). However, as radiographic regression was achieved in only 22%, microsurgical resection remains the gold standard for spinal HBs that are clearly symptomatic or have developed radiographic progression in size, spinal cord edema, or syrinx 15) 16) 17).

References

1)

Samii M, Klekamp J. Surgical results of 100 intramedullary tumors in relation to accompanying syringomyelia. Neurosurgery. 1994 Nov;35(5):865-73; discussion 873. PubMed PMID: 7838335.
2)

Krüger MT, Steiert C, Gläsker S, Klingler JH. Minimally invasive resection of spinal hemangioblastoma: feasibility and clinical results in a series of 18 patients. J Neurosurg Spine. 2019 Aug 9:1-10. doi: 10.3171/2019.5.SPINE1975. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31398701.
3)

Na JH, Kim HS, Eoh W, Kim JH, Kim JS, Kim ES. Spinal cord hemangioblastoma : diagnosis and clinical outcome after surgical treatment. J Korean Neurosurg Soc. 2007 Dec;42(6):436-40. doi: 10.3340/jkns.2007.42.6.436. Epub 2007 Dec 20. PubMed PMID: 19096585; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2588179.
4)

Montano N, Doglietto F, Pedicelli A, Albanese A, Lauretti L, Pallini R. Embolization of hemangioblastomas. J Neurosurg. 2008. 108: 1063-4
5)

Yang Y, Wang D, Jiang H, Sha C, Yuan Q, Liu J. [Treatment of spinal cord hemangioblastoma by microoperations combined with embolization]. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi. 2008. 88: 1309-12
6)

Harati A, Satopää J, Mahler L, Billon-Grand R, Elsharkawy A, Niemelä M, Hernesniemi J. Early microsurgical treatment for spinal hemangioblastomas improves outcome in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease. Surg Neurol Int. 2012;3:6. doi: 10.4103/2152-7806.92170. Epub 2012 Jan 21. PubMed PMID: 22347675; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3279991.
7)

Cornelius JF, Saint-Maurice JP, Bresson D, George B, Houdart E. Hemorrhage after particle embolization of hemangioblastomas: Comparison of outcomes in spinal and cerebellar lesions. J Neurosurg. 2007. 106: 994-8
8)

Mandigo CE, Ogden AT, Angevine PD, McCormick PC. Operative management of spinal hemangioblastoma. Neurosurgery. 2009. 65: 1166-77
9)

Mehta GU, Asthagiri AR, Bakhtian KD, Auh S, Oldfield EH, Lonser RR. Functional outcome after resection of spinal cord hemangioblastomas associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease. J Neurosurg Spine. 2010. 12: 233-42
10)

Oppenlander ME, Spetzler RF. Advances in spinal hemangioblastoma surgery. World Neurosurg. 2010. 74: 116-7
11)

Pietilä TA, Stendel R, Schilling A, Krznaric I, Brock M. Surgical treatment of spinal hemangioblastomas. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2000. 142: 879-86
12)

Clark AJ, Lu DC, Richardson RM, Tihan T, Parsa AT, Chou D. Surgical technique of temporary arterial occlusion in the operative management of spinal hemangioblastomas. World Neurosurg. 2010. 74: 200-5
13)

Molina CA, Pennington Z, Ahmed AK, Westbroek E, Goodwin ML, Tamargo R, Sciubba DM. Use of Intraoperative Indocyanine Green Angiography for Feeder Vessel Ligation and En Bloc Resection of Intramedullary Hemangioblastoma. Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown). 2019 Apr 1. pii: opz053. doi: 10.1093/ons/opz053. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31220325.
14)

Moss JM, Choi CY, Adler JR, Soltys SG, Gibbs IC, Chang SD. Stereotactic radiosurgical treatment of cranial and spinal hemangioblastomas. Neurosurgery. 2009. 65: 79-85
15)

Ammerman JM, Lonser RR, Dambrosia J, Butman JA, Oldfield EH. Long-term natural history of hemangioblastomas in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease: Implications for treatment. J Neurosurg. 2006. 105: 248-55
16)

Conway JE, Chou D, Clatterbuck RE, Brem H, Long DM, Rigamonti D. Hemangioblastomas of the central nervous system in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome and sporadic disease. Neurosurgery. 2001. 48: 55-62
17)

Samii M, Klekamp J. Surgical results of 100 intramedullary tumors in relation to accompanying syringomyelia. Neurosurgery. 1994. 35: 865-73
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